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  • Welcome to Seoul, South Korea!

  • With this video we wanted to take you on a tour of one of our favourite cities in Asia.

  • Seoul (서울) is a place where street food abounds, where cafe culture is taken to a

  • whole different level, where ancient palaces sit next to towering glass constructions,

  • and where pockets of art and creativity give the city its pulse.

  • In short, it’s a place you have to see for yourself!

  • In this video well be showing you 50 things to do in Seoul.

  • We realize this is a pretty long travel guide, so weve listed all of the sights, attractions,

  • and foods to try in the description box to make it easy for you to navigate to the places

  • youre most interested in.

  • Well hope you enjoy this tour of Seoul; now let’s get started!

  • Let’s start at Gwanghwamun Square (광화문광장), which is home to two important figures.

  • First up, youll see the statue of Yi Sun-Sin (충무공 이순신 동상).

  • He was a Korean navy commander responsible for many victories at sea, and it still revered

  • today.

  • Then just a few steps north, youll come across a seated statue of King Sejong the

  • Great (세종대왕 동상), who was the fourth king of the Joseon Dynasty.

  • He is best known for promoting literacy by creating the Korean alphabet, known as hangul.

  • From there you can continue to Gyeongbokgung Palace (경복궁 - 景福宮) to watch the

  • changing of the royal guard, which takes place twice a day and is a pretty cool ceremony

  • to witness - uniforms, weapons and live music included.

  • Once the changing of the guard is over, you can then purchase your tickets to Gyeongbokgung

  • (경복궁 - 景福宮) and tour the grounds.

  • Gyeongbok Palace (경복궁 - 景福宮) is the largest and most impressive of the 5 Grand

  • Palaces in Seoul (서울) - yes, there are lot of palaces in this city!

  • So this morning we're visiting the Bukchon Hanok Village (북촌한옥마을 - 北村韓屋)

  • and Hanok (한옥) is a traditional type of house that dates back to the Joseon dynasty.

  • So it is pretty cool.

  • You don't really see this type of construction anymore so we're going to be wandering around

  • the neighborhood checking out these homes.

  • But wherever you go you see these signs reminding you to keep quiet because families do still

  • live here and I mean you've got tourists coming around with their cameras.

  • Ourselves included so let's try to keep quiet.

  • So we're going to try not to be too annoying.

  • Yes!

  • But let's go take pictures.

  • If this sounds like your kind of thing, you can pick up a free map of Bukchon Hanok Village

  • (북촌한옥마을 - 北村韓屋) outside of Anguk Station (안국역), and go on your

  • own self-guided tour from there.

  • Now let’s talk about food for a second.

  • Well be giving you lots of recommendations throughout this video, but one of our favourites

  • that we want to mention right away is galbi (갈비).

  • Let us show you why:

  • So for today's lunch we're actually first at the restaurant.

  • This place is empty.

  • It is about 11 AM but we were super hungry so we are going to be having something called

  • Galbi (갈비) and that is marinated short ribs.

  • You can get pork or beef.

  • We've ordered pork because it is a little bit cheaper and it comes in a really sweet

  • marinade which we really enjoy so we're going to be cooking those at the table.

  • And another thing that sets Kalbi (갈비) apart from say Samgyeopsal (삼겹살) or

  • another meat is that it is cooked over charcoal.

  • So they're going to be bringing that soon and just putting it right there.

  • I know.

  • Super excited.

  • This is like the ultimate Korean grill barbecue experience.

  • That smells great.

  • Like you can already smell the sweetness coming off of the meat.

  • That is so good.

  • I know.

  • I'm like.

  • We've had this, I have to admit we had this maybe two days ago.

  • No, I think it was four or five days.

  • Was it?

  • But like it was so good and coming back here again and filming it.

  • Like we know what we're getting.

  • Oh yes.

  • Our mouth is watering.

  • Yeah, I feel like the Pavlovian dog here.

  • I'm just salivating at the sight of this meat.

  • This looks incredible.

  • Okay so Sam is ready to assemble his first piece.

  • Oh man, you better believe it.

  • The Galbi (갈비).

  • I can't believe how kind the people are here.

  • The service is incredible.

  • Like they just.

  • They cooked it for us.

  • They didn't have to do that and they did.

  • Which was so nice of them.

  • I think like I mean we could have done it by ourselves but you know it is always nice

  • to have a local doing it because they really know the ins and outs of cooking it.

  • So I am basically.

  • I've got my piece of Galbi (갈비) and I've dipped it into some Ssamjang (쌈장) sauce

  • here.

  • Let me put a little bit more on.

  • I've got onions, I've got lettuce and look here comes the jiggae (찌개).

  • More food coming.

  • Gamsahamnida (감사 합니다).

  • So it has all been assembled here.

  • Just time to pop it into my mouth.

  • You really taste the marinade and then what I love the Ssamjang (쌈장) gives it a bit

  • of a kick.

  • That has red pepper paste and also the soy paste.

  • And then when you combine it with lettuce and onion it just is aww amazing.

  • The meat is really tender.

  • Next, we have Namsan (남산) which offers an easy hike in the middle of the city.

  • So to reach Seoul Tower you basically have two options.

  • You can take the cable car which is the lazy route.

  • Or you can hike up Namsan Park.

  • And that is exactly what we're doing.

  • That is how it is done.

  • That is how it is done.

  • That is how you earn those views of Seoul.

  • We're going up N Seoul Tower.

  • We got our tickets.

  • It was 10,000 Won per person.

  • The view.

  • Made it to the top now time to enjoy the views that we've earned.

  • Yeah.

  • You know what?

  • It has gotten a little bit hazy since earlier this morning so it might be a little gray

  • but we still get to see the whole city.

  • On top of Namsan (남산), youll find N Seoul Tower (N서울타워), which is a major

  • landmark.

  • If you ride the elevator to the top, you can get 360 degree views of the city.

  • Aside from that, they also have cultural performances on the square directly below the tower, so

  • be sure to check the schedule while youre there.

  • For a taste of where Seoul’s youth hang out, hop over to Hongdae (홍대 - 弘大).

  • The area gets its name from Hongik Daehakgyo, which is one of the leading art universities.

  • That translates into an area full of creativity, and it’s also a great area for nightlife

  • Which brings us to our next point: noraebang (노래방)!

  • So if there is one thing you need to try while you're in Seoul (ソウル) it is Noraebang.

  • And that is a singing room.

  • Yeah, these Korean singing rooms are awesome.

  • Like they are so much fun.

  • We didn't even enjoy singing before we came to Korea and now we're really into it.

  • So that is how cool it is.

  • How it works, is that you rent a room with a few friends for an hour, and then you can

  • sing your heart out complete with tambourines.

  • It’s a lot of fun and we both got into it.

  • Another experience not to be missed is visiting a jjimjilbang (찜질방).

  • This is a sauna, bathhouse, and communal space where you can either crash after a late night

  • out, or go to relax and pamper yourself a little bit.

  • Jjjimjilbangs (찜질방) have different spaces where you can sleep, watch movies, read, work

  • out, eat, play video games, and so much more.

  • We went to Siloam sauna (실로암사우나) which is one of the best in the city and is

  • also conveniently located across from Seoul Station (서울역).

  • So we're heading inside the charcoal room.

  • It is only twenty two degrees and that is the coldest room we've been able to find.

  • Aside from the ice room.

  • The others are like fifty or sixty degrees which is just unbearable for me.

  • Yeah, that would be bad for the camera.

  • So let's go in.

  • Quietly, because people are sleeping.

  • Come in.

  • One neighbourhood to tack on to your itinerary is Insadong (인사동 - 仁寺洞).

  • This area is home to antique stores, art galleries, and souvenir shops where you can pick up traditional

  • Korean gifts to take back home with you.

  • If you wander down Insadong’s (인사동 - 仁寺洞) side streets and back alleys,

  • youll also discover lots of cute tea houses, which brings us to our next point:

  • Insadong’s tea houses (차) offer a quiet escape from the buzz of the main street, and

  • dropping by for some tea is a great way to unwind in between all the shopping and sightseeing.

  • Many of the teahouses (찻집) are set in old hanok buildings, where you sit on mats

  • on the ground.

  • Have arrived.

  • Tell us what we're having.

  • Yeah, so the one that I ordered is called gyepi cha (계피 차) and you can have a

  • look at it down here.

  • It comes in a nice like kind of fancy traditional cup.

  • It is almost like a soup bowl.

  • Yeah, it really is.

  • And this is a Korean cinnamon tea (한국어 계피 차) so I'm really excited about this.

  • I love anything with cinnamon so this should be great.

  • Okay, so for mine I got the Maesilcha (매실차, 梅實茶) which is a green plum tea and it

  • has got ice cubes in it.

  • Much needed today.

  • Hahaha.

  • You can actually see behind you there is the air conditioner guys.

  • That huge air conditioner.

  • That is so so hot.

  • And this is so good it is like juice.

  • It is like a sweet syrupy plum juice.

  • Refreshing?

  • Um hum.

  • So good.

  • And we also ordered some sweets to go along with the tea.

  • So what can you tell us?

  • What are we having there.

  • Yeah, so this is really exciting.

  • We've got persimmon slices.

  • They've been dried and then we have some special tteok (떡) which is the Korean rice cakes

  • and they appear to have it looks like rice crispies around them.

  • Yeah they're actually instead of cakes they're more like rice crisps.

  • And I think we've had these ones before like several years ago and they're really airy.

  • They're almost like rice puffs but they are sweet.

  • From Insadong (인사동) it’s only a short walk to another cool neighbourhood called

  • Samcheong-dong (삼청동 - 三淸洞).

  • This is a very artistic neighbourhood with lots of indie boutiques, coffee shops, and

  • galleries, and it’s one of my favourite parts of the city.

  • So for today's lunch we are going to be having Samgyeopsal (삼겹살) and that is a Korean

  • pork belly that you cook yourself at the table.

  • It is like really fatty pork, so it is going to be nice and crisp.

  • Yeah, it kind of reminds me a little bit of Canadian bacon except more thickly sliced.

  • Bacon for lunch.

  • So they came and helped us out a little bit.

  • And they basically cut the meat into little pieces so that they can cook a little bit

  • further and get nice and golden.

  • Also, I should mention this meat isn't seasoned at all and they didn't add any oil to cook

  • it either.

  • I think the idea is just that the fat is going to start melting and that will allow it to

  • cook.

  • You know cook in its own fat and give it more flavor.

  • So yeah, we're just waiting now.

  • Waiting for it to turn golden and crispy.

  • I like mine really burnt.

  • Yeah, me too.

  • Which is kind of strange because like if I'm eating steak or something else like that I

  • tend to like it a bit more rare.

  • Yeah, a bit more raw.

  • But with Samgyeopsal (삼겹살) I find it tastes optimum when it is like charred a bit.

  • Yeah, it is so fatty that you kind of want it to be golden and crispy.

  • Otherwise it is just like chewing fat and I'm not a huge fan of that.

  • Okay, so time to make this happen.

  • Let's assemble your first bite.

  • It sure is time.

  • I can't wait for this.

  • So I'm grabbing my piece of Samgyeopsal (삼겹살), the Korean pork belly and you know what I

  • am going for a super one here so I'm putting my garlic, my manul on here, a little bit

  • of ssamjang put that right like that and a little bit some salad.

  • Wow that is going to be a big bite.

  • Perfect.

  • It is going to be a huge bite.

  • And now I'm going to roll that all up.

  • Gamsahamnida (감사합니다).

  • Scrunch it up into a ball.

  • And one shot.

  • One bomb.

  • Mmmmm.

  • Oh man.

  • That is so good.

  • So I think tonight we are going to try and show you the nightlife in Seoul.

  • Gumbae!

  • Gumbae!

  • A typical night out in Korea (대한민국) could start out with chicken and beer or barbecue

  • and soju, and you can go bar hopping from there.

  • As the evening progresses, you could end up singing the night away at a noraebang or documenting

  • your adventures at a photo booth.

  • So we're having a photo shoot after soju and beer.

  • How do we do this?

  • Oh what background do you want?

  • Uh, cutesy.

  • We've never done this before.

  • I don't even know what is going on.

  • Okay so now we get to decorate our pictures.

  • Hahaha.

  • Hahaha.