Basic UK 19046 Folder Collection
After playing the video, you can click or select the word to look it up in the dictionary.
Loading...
Report Subtitle Errors
Hi. I'm Gill at engvid.com,
and today we're going to be looking at the days of the
week and the origin of the names of the days, which are obviously different in different
languages, but in the English language, the days, a lot of them, apart from the sun and
the moon, a lot of the days are named after gods. Not... Not god, not the Christian god,
but before Christianity came to the UK or to Britain, we had these... It's called pagan
gods. "Pagan" just means before Christianity. So, there were these not just one god, but
a group of gods, and a goddess as well, a female god. And the days were named after
them. Okay. So let's have a look through the days of the week and I'll tell you all about
how the day got its name. Okay. So, this goes back hundreds of years, so that's why it's
a little strange.
So, "Sunday", the main religious day in the Christian world, but before Christianity in
the pagan times, Sunday-obviously, "sun"-was named after the sun. Sun's Day. Because, obviously,
you look up into the sky and the sun is the brightest thing there, and it keeps you warm
and all of that, so everyone knew the sun was very important for human life to survive,
so they named the first day of the week after the sun. Sun's Day. And just to make a link,
here, with the German language because we share a lot of similar words with the German language:
"Sonntag", so in German as well, the sun... The word for "sun" in German is
in the name of the German word for Sunday. Okay. Right, so that's Sunday, Sun's Day,
the day dedicated to the sun.
Next day: "Monday". It's not totally obvious, but it's named after the moon. Moon. "Mon",
"moon", so there's a little moon. And again, because the sun, most important and then after
that you look up in the sky at night and you see the moon, so it's like the second most
important thing that you see. So, Moon's Day, Monday. And in German: "Montag", so that's
the moon in German. But also, the example from French because in French the word for
"moon" is "lune", "la lune", so in French, again, the day is named after the moon and
it's called "lundi". So even in French, which has a different word, it's still connected
with the moon. Okay.
Right, so that's the sun and the moon for the first two days of the week.
Now, this is where it gets interesting. "Tuesday" is named after one of the pagan gods called
Tiu, T-i-u. Tiu's Day. Okay? And he came from the sort of North European group of gods.
Okay? And Tiu was the god of war. He represented war or... And the god of the sky, generally.
And the link, here, with the Southern European gods which come mostly from the Roman gods.
So, the French name for Tuesday, and the French words come from the southern group of gods,
the Roman god of war is Mars. Okay? Like the planet... There's also a link with the planets,
and that's the red planet, Mars. So, in French, Tuesday is called "mardi" because it's linked
to Mars. So, in the northern group of gods we have Tiu's Day and he's the god of war,
and in the southern group of gods we have mardi, Mars, and Mars is also the god of war
in the Southern European gods. Okay. Whoops, sorry. Right.
Moving on: "Wednesday", which is always a tricky one to spell, difficult to spell. It's
Wed-nes-day, but we pronounce it: "Wensday". That's named after Woden. Woden's Day. Okay?
And Woden was the sort of chief god in charge of all the other gods. He was the top god.
Woden's Day. Okay. In the southern group of gods, in French, Wednesday is "mercredi",
which is named after Mercury. But in this case, Mercury is not the equivalent of Woden.
So, sorry, that's a bit not very... Anyway, that's the way it goes. We can't change it.
"mercredi" in French is named after Mercury, who was the messenger god. Okay. And again,
there's a planet named after Mercury as well. So, anyway, Northern European, Woden's Day.
Wednesday. Right.
Moving on to "Thursday" which is named after Thor. Thor's Day. Thursday. And I've put these
little... That's not thunder. It's the god of thunder. When there's a storm, the sound
of the thunder. This is the flash of light from the lightning, but you get thunder and
lightning when there's a storm, the noise and the light flashing. So, Thor is the northern
god of thunder. Okay? And in German, "Donnerstag", "donner" means thunder in German. So, in German
that day is also named after the god of thunder. Okay. Thor's Day. In the Southern European
names it's named after Jove. Jove, who is the equivalent of Thor, because Jove is also...
Also has thunder and lightning. He causes the thunder and the lightning. So, Jove. In
French, the day is called "jeudi", "jeudi", which comes from Jove. Okay. So, Thursday,
Thor's Day.
Now, you'd be wondering: Where are all the...? All the female gods, the goddesses? So, at
last we have one, just one in the whole group of seven, so fairly typical of women's equality.
A token woman. Okay. "Friday", Freya's Day. So, Freya, I think she's like the wife of
the chief god, but she represents love, being the wife of the chief god. And in German,
again, "Freitag", so in German as well, Friday is named after Freya, the northern goddess
of love. And similarly, in the Southern European group, Venus. So, Venus, the goddess of love,
the Roman goddess of love is the equivalent of Freya, Venus. We also have a planet, again,
named after Venus. And in French: "vendredi" is sort of vaguely like the name Venus, so
there is a link again there between the northern and the southern version.
Okay, so Freya's Day, Friday.
And finally: "Saturday". Saturn's Day. Okay? Now, this time it's not a Northern European
god. It's a Roman god, because the Romans actually came to Britain. This probably influenced
the naming of the day. The Romans were in Britain for a certain length of time and influenced
some of the things. So, it's Saturn was the Roman god of agriculture and maybe various
other things. Roman god of agriculture, and also, again, there's a planet, Saturn, the
one with the rings around it. Okay? So, Saturn's Day. Saturday.
Okay, so I hope that's helped you to understand why the days of the week are named like that,
and also to understand a little bit of the
cultural historical background to how they came to be named like that.
Okay? So, if you'd like to go to the website, engvid.com,
there's a quiz there that you can do on this subject.
And if you've enjoyed this lesson,
perhaps you'd like to subscribe to my YouTube channel.
And I hope to see you again soon. Thanks for listening.
Bye.
    You must  Log in  to get the function.
Tip: Click on the article or the word in the subtitle to get translation quickly!

Loading…

Loading…

Where do the names of the days of the week come from?

19046 Folder Collection
seesaw published on April 24, 2017    Jenny translated    Hsin reviewed
More Recommended Videos
  1. 1. Search word

    Select word on the caption to look it up in the dictionary!

  2. 2. Repeat single sentence

    Repeat the same sentence to enhance listening ability

  3. 3. Shortcut

    Shortcut!

  4. 4. Close caption

    Close the English caption

  5. 5. Embed

    Embed the video to your blog

  6. 6. Unfold

    Hide right panel

  1. Listening Quiz

    Listening Quiz!

  1. Click to open your notebook

  1. UrbanDictionary 俚語字典整合查詢。一般字典查詢不到你滿意的解譯,不妨使用「俚語字典」,或許會讓你有滿意的答案喔