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  • Hi guys! Hey guys.

  • Today we're going to talk about terms of endearment in Japanese.

  • Or pet names, AKA the things you call your significant other

  • other than their name.

  • So in English we have things like:

  • honey, darling, sweetheart, sweetie,

  • babe, bae, boo...

  • You can call your SO pretty much anything in English.

  • It doesn't even have to be a real word if you say it with the right intonation.

  • People can understand that you're using it as a term of endearment.

  • You can be like, "This is my snickerdoodle here" or something

  • and people would be like, "All right, that's just what they call each other."

  • "They call each other 'snickerdoodle'. Ok."

  • So what kind of things would you say here in Japan for a pet name?

  • I really can't think of anything right now.

  • Do we even really have any pet names? I don't think we do.

  • We know that you guys use "honey" or "darling".

  • We have katakana so we just spell it "hani-" or "da-rin".

  • But we don't really use it.

  • No one actually says "da-rin"?

  • "Ohayou, da-rin!"

  • Maaybe some people do.

  • But not really.

  • There kind of aren't really any Japanese terms of endearment.

  • I guess Japanese people don't tend to be very verbal with their affection.

  • Right, right. Exactly. Not really.

  • Not verbal.

  • So they do actually kind of have one term of endearment that you can use here,

  • which is the word "anata."

  • The word "anata" is the word for "you,"

  • which we're actually taught in Japanese 101 you're not supposed to use

  • because it's rude if you know someone else's name and you use the word "anata."

  • You see married wives call their husband "anata" sometimes.

  • It seems like a word that's more commonly used among married couples or-

  • Right.

  • -or slightly older couples.

  • Not like "old" old, but they've been married a while.

  • Right.

  • That's kind of the image I have of anata.

  • I read Death Note both in Japanese and in English,

  • and Yagami Light's mother, she called Soichiro "anata."

  • And in the English version it's translated as "darling."

  • Darling, yeah.

  • So that's kind of like the one word you can use here that's an actual word.

  • Other than that I feel like you would kind of have to make up your own pet name

  • or something like a nickname for someone, right?

  • Yeah, some people use -chan.

  • So like, Rachel-chan or Rei-chan.

  • -chan, I guess.

  • Rei-chan or something.

  • I think so.

  • Jun-chan.

  • Yeah, a lot of my friends call me Jun-chan.

  • If you're a little bit nerdier or I guess if you want to joke around, I guess you could say -tan.

  • Oh, that sounds really nerdy.

  • Yeah.

  • Rachel-tan.

  • Well I don't know any friends from Akihabara who actually use that.

  • I don't know but yeah, I guess so.

  • In the beginning of our relationship I didn't know any terms of endearment in Japanese

  • and so I would just make things up to call Jun.

  • So I would say things like "suteki na otto,"

  • which is more like a sentence.

  • Wait, that's what you were trying to do?

  • Which is saying my magnificent husband or something like that.

  • It was not a name. It was a sentence.

  • Yeah, it's more like a sentence.

  • Or I would say like...

  • Otto-san

  • Mr. husband

  • My Mr. Husband.

  • Okay.

  • Kinda like it.

  • You can just make stuff up. Whatever sounds good with you then I guess.

  • I guess so.

  • And I mean you know it's not like there's a wrong way to call someone in Japanese.

  • Just because they don't have terms of endearment really

  • doesn't mean you're not allowed to make up a term of endearment.

  • But if your partner is Japanese, I suggest you ask your partner if it sounds okay first at least, I think.

  • I don't want you to call me like magnificent husband in public.

  • That sounds weird.

  • Hello everyone, this is my magnificent husband.

  • I would never say that in public to other people.

  • Just make sure it sounds at least okay.

  • Or maybe private.

  • Privately.

  • See Jun's not comfortable with this stuff in public.

  • No, no, no. I'm fine. But it sounds weird.

  • What if I start calling you like sugar muffin in public?

  • I really don't know. Sugar muffin? That sounds sweet.

  • If we were with a group of friends, would you be embarrassed if I said like...

  • "Hey sweetie, can you come over here for a second?" or something?

  • I'm so used to this. I'm perfectly fine.

  • Jun started using terms of endearment here just recently.

  • He's using the word honey, but he doesn't really know how to use terms of endearment,

  • so he only uses it when he's really stressed out.

  • Like he wants me to come get the cat because he's trying to work.

  • So he'll say like,

  • Honey, can you come get the cat?

  • He's only using it in really bad situations.

  • So I guess it's just not really a cultural thing here

  • to use terms of endearment for your significant other.

  • We don't really feel the need to call your...

  • insignificant other?

  • like darling or-

  • No, "significant other" not "insignificant other."

  • That's horrible to say about someone.

  • This is my INsignificant other.

  • They're not important to me at all.

  • Some people actually even think this way.

  • If you say it too often, the meaning becomes a little lighter.

  • Well yeah. Do you know what I mean?

  • There are some people in America who feel that way, too.

  • But I don't understand that because

  • it's not like I have an MP bar for love,

  • and I can only cast LOVE every 30 days.

  • I can say I love you as many times as I want. I'm never going to run out of MP or anything.

  • It's not like going down every time I say love.

  • That's actually a very interesting and easy way to put this.

  • So it's like the strongest magic you can use in Japan.

  • It costs like 100 MP.

  • It doesn't cost anything!

  • Like here [with you] it only costs like 1MP right?

  • But here it costs 100MP.

  • It doesn't cost any MP at all.

  • It does. It also takes some courage, too.

  • I guess it's just not really a big cultural thing here,

  • terms of endearment or pet names.

  • Not really.

  • So yeah you can just make up your own name

  • and maybe it discuss it over and make sure you're not saying something SUPER weird or strange

  • even though maybe that'll be funny, too.

  • I still like saying "suteki na otto."

  • Ok.

  • I hope you guys learned something in this video!

  • Thanks for watching and we'll see you later! Bye!

Hi guys! Hey guys.

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A2 japanese mp chan jun guess husband

Japanese Pet Names ♡ What to call your partner? ハニーって本当に呼ぶの?

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    Neilly Lee posted on 2017/01/22
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