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  • You are healed. You are...

  • Hi, James from engVid.

  • When I'm not actually teaching English, sometimes

  • I do religious services. I'm joking, but this is a serious matter.

  • By the end of this video,

  • I would like to make sure that when you speak to people of different religious faiths or backgrounds,

  • you will be able to, when you will remember that...

  • Well, how to talk about religion, or faith, or belief. Okay? Sometimes we talk about religion, and sometimes we can

  • say "faith" or "belief" and it means to believe in a higher power; it could be God, it could

  • be a Spirit, whatever moves you.

  • I think it's kind of a serious lesson, because religion is a very powerful force in our lives,

  • and we should be respectful of one another or to each other when we discuss it. You can't

  • have an open dialogue if you have a closed mind. "Dialogue" means to talk, okay? So,

  • this lesson is to help you be able to speak to someone else who doesn't believe the same

  • way you do, so at least you understand each other. Listen to me carefully: You don't have

  • to always agree or like, but you can respect and understand, and that's today's lesson.

  • So, ready to get serious? Let's go to the board, shall we? Okay.

  • So, you'll notice I have different symbols up here. I am a terrible drawer. I can't do

  • anything. The worm is as good... Sorry, E. Mr. E is as good as I get, so this is as good

  • as you're going to get. So if you go: "My faith is not there. I'm Bahai." I'm like:

  • "You're behind me, because I don't know how to draw it. Sorry." So, here are some of the

  • world's major religions that have billions of people that follow, or hundreds of millions.

  • So I tried my best. Forgiveness if I didn't get it quite right. Okay? Nobody get upset.

  • I did a bad drawing for all of you.

  • Let's go to the board. One of the most common questions people say when they talk about

  • religion, they meet you and go:

  • "Hi. My name is James. I'm from Canada. I teach English. Do you believe in God?"

  • And that's the problem right there. "Do you believe in God?"

  • You're going: "What's the problem? It's a question." Yeah, but it's a yes/no question. Please check

  • out the other videos I have on making interesting conversation, because especially in this one,

  • when you say yes or no, you really limit the person, or we say put them in a corner. You

  • put me in a place where I'm with you or against you. Already we have division or friction.

  • So why don't we ask a question that lets them speak to us, and explain to them where we're

  • coming from so that we can get a mutual understanding? Now we understand together.

  • And I think I've got two questions that can help you make friends from different faiths,

  • so you understand each other and start that dialogue. Remember? Talking. If you say:

  • "Are you a person of faith?" you're not... They can say yes or no, but you're actually not

  • saying "God". Remember I said "faith" or "belief"? "Belief" means to think something is real.

  • "Faith" means to believe something... Believe in something. And when you're thinking of

  • that, I don't necessarily have to think of God. I could think of a force that makes the

  • world go around. Gaia. Some people believe in Gaia. Life... The Earth is alive and we're

  • part of the Earth. That's a belief, it's a faith. Some people believe... Have... Well,

  • you don't have a belief in science. You could say it's a belief, but they believe in science.

  • Right? And that has nothing to do with God. So when people say: "Do you believe in God?"

  • They're really saying: "There are those who believe in God, and the blasphemers and the heathens",

  • and it doesn't have to be like that. Some people don't believe in the book,

  • but they actually believe in the same God you do. So, give them a break. Okay? And ask:

  • "Hey, are you a person of faith?" And they might say:

  • "Yes, I do believe in a higher power." Okay?

  • Another question you can have that's like a "do" question, is:

  • "Do you have a faith that you follow?" And that means: Do you have ideas that you believe in,

  • that you think are true, and you actually work with them or work to improve yourself based on these

  • ideas? That's what the Bible, and the Torah, and the Talmud, and the Quran are about. Right?

  • Those are some basic books. Or the Tao Te Ching; self-improvement by following certain

  • principles. So, if I follow a faith, I follow these rules and live my life by them. Okay?

  • Now, once you ask a person: "Are you a person of faith?" or "Do you follow a faith?" you

  • might get the following response: "Yes, I'm very religious. Hmmm." Or:

  • "I'm spiritual, man. Can you see the vibes? Can you see the colours? It's all around you, you know?"

  • They might go: "I'm agnostic, yes. I'm educated. I am eating away from agnostic, away from

  • knowledge, I'm away from the knowledge of a possible god, so I don't know; therefore,

  • I will not speak about it." See, "agnostic" doesn't mean I don't believe in God, it means

  • I have no knowledge about it, therefore I cannot talk about it. It's not the same as

  • "atheist". Okay? "Gnosis" means knowledge, and "a" means away from knowledge.

  • "Atheist" is different. "Atheist" means: "I don't believe. I don't believe in no God or

  • no Jesus, or nothing like that up there." Okay? So, if someone tells you they're agnostic,

  • don't treat them the same as atheist. Now, I might have been a little quick on something,

  • so I have to make sure you understand agnostic and atheist.

  • Let's go to "religious" and "spiritual". Remember? When we talk about being religious... "Religion"

  • means there is a book, and that book has rules or suggestions that you should follow, and

  • a belief system, or someone that's the head. So, I'll give an example in the Christian

  • religion, somebody believes there's a God, a being called God, there are some rules that

  • they have to follow in order to be Christian. And in this case, Jesus Christ wrote the rules

  • that you follow, and that's why it's a religion, a way of living and life.

  • "Spiritual" is more a belief that there is something more than what you see.

  • We call this the material world. "We live in a material..." No, not the Madonna song.

  • Get it out of your head, clear it.

  • When you live in the material world, it's what you can see. If I cannot

  • smell it, hear it, touch it, or taste it - it doesn't exist. The world of science, the material

  • world. In the spiritual world, they believe I see what's here, but I believe there's something

  • else out there. What it is, I don't know. It could be a god, it could be a spirit. In

  • Japan, they believe there are spirits in the water and in the mountains, but they don't

  • actually believe in a god, one big god. In the... In America and in England, they believe

  • in a God. Some people believe in Allah in... In the Arabic or the Islamic faith, they believe

  • in Allah. Okay? That would be more religious. Spiritual, there's just something. Okay?

  • So, we've gone through "religious", "spiritual", "agnostic", and "atheist". This is how you

  • would define yourself. If someone said: "Are you a person of faith?" you could say:

  • "I have no faith. I'm an atheist." Agnostic, "gnosis" being knowledge, and away from; I

  • have no knowledge of God or other, so I don't know, and that's what they're saying. Agnostics

  • are saying: "I don't know", so leave them alone. They're not trying to get on one team

  • or the other. Okay?

  • Now, we talked about where are you. If you are one of these things, and probably this

  • one, religious, you're going to go, where? To these places. "Synagogue". A "synagogue"

  • is for Jewish people. Okay? They're one of the oldest books of religion, and they believe

  • there was a God that created our world, and they go to a synagogue to worship their God.

  • "Worship" means to pay respect to-right?-and get in contact with. So, if you worship your

  • God, you want to give respect to the God for creating the world for you, and contact; have

  • that God communicate with you in some way so you know what to do with your life.

  • Now, if you're a Muslim or you study Islam, you go to a "mosque", also known as a "masjid".

  • Masjid, masjid. Don't kill me, I'm trying, okay? I said three different ways. Okay? So

  • you go to a mosque or a masjid.

  • "Churches" are used for Christian faith or Christ. You can remember that with the "Ch",

  • think: "Christian", "Christ", "Church". Okay?

  • "Shrines", Hindus have shrines. Okay? You can also have a shrine in your house. So,

  • this isn't just for a religious thing; you can have a shrine in your house. For some

  • losers in North America, specifically Toronto, they have a shrine to Maple Leafs. Yeah, I

  • said it. They suck, stop collecting their cards and stuff. But a shrine is a place where

  • you go to, and you may pray at it, and try and communicate with your God. It can be in

  • your house, or can be a bigger place where people gather and go together. Okay? You can't

  • have a church in your house, but you can have a shrine. Shrine. Shrine up here.

  • "Temple". Now, some people who are Jewish call the synagogue the temple. Not everyone.

  • It's called the synagogue. But a temple is a place of worship outside around the world.

  • I don't know all the places. I'm not going to lie and make it up for you, but it's another

  • place of worship that people go to if they're going to the temple.

  • If you've ever seen Indiana Jones-please watch it; great movie

  • -he goes to the Temple of Doom. Seriously, it's a temple

  • of doom, really. Anyway, but you can go see that, and you'll see it was a place of worship

  • from a long time ago. Okay? Yeah, his heart gets ripped out, and he runs from a great

  • big rock. Yeah? Serious business was with the temple. Don't mess with them. All right?

  • And a general, general term is "a place of worship". So you can just say:

  • "Hey, where's your place of worship?" and then they can tell you: "Synagogue", "mosque", "church",

  • "shrine", or "temple", and then you'll have an idea of which faith they follow.

  • Now, each particular group has a leader that's usually in one of these places, and the leaders

  • have different names. In Islam, it's an "imam". Imam? Imam. Imam. Imam. I'm home. Okay, so

  • the imam is the leader of the mosque. In the Judaic faith or Judaism, it's a "rabbi". Okay?

  • Christians, we're kind of special folk, we're special. You know why? Because we got three

  • names. Depends where you are, you can have a "pastor", a "reverend", or a "preacher",

  • also "priest", but I want to come back to "priest" after. You usually hear about a preacher

  • in the southern states of the United States of America. In Canada, people don't generally

  • talk about preachers. They'll talk about their pastor or their reverend. In most other places,

  • like Great Britain, they'll talk about the pastor; not the preacher. But American and

  • southern baptism, they'll talk about the preacher man. The preacher man don told us. [Laughs]

  • Okay? But we also have "priests" if you're a Catholic. Right? Catholic, you have priests,

  • and they are similar to these other ones.

  • I've put a star beside the "priest" or the "priestess" because outside, if you don't

  • know about someone's religion or you're travelling to a foreign country, and these terms don't

  • apply because they're for specific religions, you can say: "Is that the priest or the priestess?"

  • because it would be the holy person. I guess that's another one you can say: "the holy person".

  • But when we hear "priest" or "priestess" we know it's the leader of that particular

  • group. Okay? And they're holy people. They have a...

  • Maybe spiritual or maybe they're religious. Okay? Cool.

  • Now, I want to end this lesson on something very quickly, because this can make a huge

  • or a very big difference in what we talk and how we talk to each other, and you need to

  • pay attention to respect them. "Non-practicing". Many people are religious. They'll say: "I'm Christian",

  • or "I'm Jewish", or "I'm... I'm Muslim", or what have you, or a Hindu. And...

  • But what they say is... What they say is... Oh, sorry. I don't want to forget the "How"

  • before I get off. But what they say when they talk about this is they're "non-practicing",

  • they mean they believe in a religion, but they are not in church or observing the rules.

  • So, if you're Jewish, for instance, and you don't go to the synagogue and you eat bacon,

  • you're a non-practicing Jew if you say:

  • "Hey, I still believe in Judaism. I just like a bacon sandwich, and I'm not going to the synagogue today. Got it?"

  • But you can still be Jewish,

  • but you're not practicing the rites, or the culture, or the things that you're supposed to follow.

  • Now, this is directly opposite to the "orthodox". Orthodox means by the strict letter. "Strict"

  • means you follow exactly what it says. So, if someone tells you they're orthodox, they're

  • orthodox Jewish, or they're orthodox Muslim, or they're orthodox Christian - we're talking

  • about a completely different creature. You've got to respect where they come from. Don't