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  • British English vs American English

  • Hey guys!

  • Hi. Hi!

  • This is our friend, Laura. Laura!

  • She's from the UK and she's an English teacher. Yep.

  • How long have you been teaching?

  • 5 years, roughly.

  • She's a professional English teacher.

  • Yeah.

  • Anyway, as an English learner I have a lot of questions about the English language

  • and I'm going to ask these two a lot of questions today.

  • Especially (because) she's from America, and she's from England, so...

  • American English vs... English... English? English English.

  • Just English. Just English.

  • Okay, British English.

  • So one of the things I always get confused by is grammar, of course

  • and especially tense.

  • When I was in school, I was taught that you can't really

  • use words like "already" or "yet" with past tense.

  • So I'll just go ahead and read these sentences for you guys

  • so can you tell me which one is more natural for you to say?

  • Okay.

  • He has already left. He already left.

  • He already left.

  • Yeah, for me probably "He's already left" so "He has already left."

  • And my teacher told me that you CAN'T say "He already left."

  • Why would they say you can't say that??

  • That's a common thing.

  • That's what my teacher told me.

  • I'm going to read this sentence again, so tell me which one's more natural.

  • Okay.

  • Can I have a bath? Can I take a bath?

  • Which one would you use?

  • Take a bath. You say "Take a bath."

  • Have. Have a bath. Yeah, right?

  • Can I have a bath? I used to say "Can I have a bath?" too.

  • Rachel says "Take a bath" always. Yeah.

  • You also say "Take a nap" right? Take a nap? Yeah.

  • I'm gonna have a nap. Yeah, "Have a nap."

  • I don't think that's very common in America.

  • So for these... it's not wrong, but it's not common.

  • So because it's not common. Yeah.

  • Take sounds kind of strong.

  • TAKE. I'm gonna TAKE this bath!

  • I feel like you can't "have" a bath. Like, "Can I have a bath? Thank you!"

  • Just have the water in the bath.

  • I'll just take it all with me.

  • That's the impression I got when you first told me, "Can I take a bath?"

  • Like, how possibly can you "take" a bath? I'll just carry this out.

  • I'm gonna go have a nap. It's more gentle.

  • It sounds very proper. ~I'm going to have a nap~

  • I think all those British English things sound very proper to us.

  • That's interesting. Their way sounds more proper and politer?

  • Except "I was SAT by the fire." We don't say "was sat."

  • My teacher would say no to Laura.

  • That's wrong grammatically.

  • It's my dialect.

  • So how do you say "was sat"?

  • You don't say "was sat." You have to say "was sitting."

  • It has to be "was ____ing."

  • Yep. "I was doing..."

  • I'm on Rachel's side. Why are you bullying me?

  • So that's a dialect?

  • Yeah, according to reddit.

  • Okay. If you're from Norfolk that's how you talk.

  • Oh, another one. This is- I hate this one.

  • You know, everyone uses Microsoft Office and Word to write things and

  • every time I type the word "travelling" it always corrects my English.

  • It says I don't need two L's.

  • It only needs one L.

  • I've been in a similar situation where I've been typing something up at work

  • and it comes up like [THIS IS WRONG.] And I'm like... what??

  • So I go on google and I'm like, is this really wrong??

  • And google's like, "Eh, you can use both. It doesn't really matter," you know.

  • But like, Microsoft Office is like [NO.]

  • And it underlines the word with that wavy red. That angry red.

  • [YOU ARE WRONG.]

  • I've added so many words to my dictionary.

  • Every time it's like [NO.] I'm like YES.

  • I don't care! This is how I'm gonna do it.

  • I just get really annoyed every time I have to add those "new" words to the dictionary.

  • So annoying.

  • This is something that we say both ways in Japan.

  • セーター and ジャンパー Sweater and jumper.

  • What's (a) sweater? This is a sweater!

  • So this is (a) sweater?

  • Yeah, that could be a sweater. But here, I'll show you a British jumper.

  • You know Bridget Jones.

  • When she has that Christmas jumper and it's got like a snowman or a reindeer on it or something

  • and Darcy has like a mat- No.

  • That is a jumper.

  • That's a sweater.

  • In UK this is (a) jumper?

  • That's a Christmas jumper.

  • This is a sweater to me.

  • Yeah. You guys are wrong.

  • But one thing that I really agree with you on is

  • trousers.

  • Trousers. Yeah.

  • We just don't use the word trousers. That sounds so old-fashioned.

  • We're old, apparently.

  • No, you're just British. It's fine.

  • I'm neither. I'm just a learner.

  • When I first heard Rachel say "pants" to me it was still underwear

  • so it was really weird.

  • Are pants underwear in Britain?

  • Men's underwear. Yeah, men's underwear.

  • Another one I get confused by is this one.

  • Do you say "at the weekend" in America? Nope.

  • Do you say "at the weekend?" Yeah.

  • Specifically if you want to say the weekend, how do you say it?

  • What are you going to do... this weekend?

  • This weekend. What are you gonna do this weekend? What are you gonna do next weekend?

  • What are you gonna do for the weekend?

  • So you're not going to use "at." No, not "at" in American English.

  • I'm pretty sure.

  • And another one that's super annoying is the spelling differences.

  • How do you spell "center/centre," Rachel?

  • center

  • How do you spell it?

  • centre

  • We do that when we want to be fancy.

  • English is naturally fancy.

  • We spell it the British way when we want to be fancy. Interesting.

  • So America uses the British way of spelling to make it fancy sometimes.

  • Do you use the American way of spelling to make it fancy?

  • No.

  • Sorry. Maybe not.

  • I teach American English, so when I first started teaching

  • I used to have to check EVERYTHING.

  • Like, "Wait, is this the American way or is this the English way?"

  • And then, this and this.

  • Even now I'm like confused in my brain which one is which.

  • I do that too with Jun's English sometimes.

  • Like sometimes if Jun says something the same way so many times

  • and I forget to correct him

  • then it just like imprints in my brain and I'm like, "What's the normal way to say it?!"

  • "Can I say it like this??"

  • Can you believe this?! She blames me on... what?!

  • You're native!!

  • When I was in college I was staying with the foreign students

  • and one of them asked me "Where is the torch?"

  • So, what's "torch"?

  • To me a torch is this.

  • Yeah. To me.

  • That's... that's wonderful.

  • I literally thought he was looking for this.

  • A torch to me is actually what you would like walk through a cave with.

  • Like a stick with alcohol soaked-

  • I said to someone-- it wasn't you, it was somebody else--

  • I'm pretty sure he was American, and I was like

  • "Do you have a torch?" because we were gonna go outside and he was like

  • ".........Where would I get one??"

  • And I was like, "I dunno, doesn't your phone have a torch?"

  • And he went, "......No????"

  • And I was like ???

  • So this is a torch. Yeah.

  • Flashlight. Yeah.

  • It's called a fla- PFFF

  • --a flashlight!

  • Okay, last question.

  • I'm gonna ask you to read these brand names. Can you read out loud for me?

  • Uh-huh.

  • AH-di-das

  • I've never heard that!

  • But, like, I'm sure other people in England say AH-di-das as well...

  • I'm sure it's not just me.

  • Anyway, UK, you say AH-di-das.

  • You stress A. And America, you stress I.

  • Ah-DI-das. Yeah.

  • And lastly:

  • Nai-ki

  • Naik.

  • Naik.

  • British people, please tell me you also say "naik"!!