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  • So I think we'll get started again.

  • A quick announcement because one of the questions

  • provoked a good connection.

  • Rebecca is where?

  • Rebecca in the bottom here has pointed out

  • that there is a symposium here in Granoff Saturday, March

  • 5 called Designing the Next Steps.

  • And it's a day of workshops, community classes, discussion,

  • design, lecture, demonstrations, and art installations.

  • Here's the part where it has particular relevance.

  • The ASaP Symposium explores holistic, artistic

  • interventions for diverse populations.

  • This year's focus is on the power

  • of design and implementation of arts programming

  • in the medical field.

  • So Rebecca has more information on this specific program.

  • You can go and seek her out.

  • But a nice corollary to this day, especially the connection

  • to the medical field a week from tomorrow.

  • Maxine Greene was an important inspiration

  • for many of us, philosopher of education and aesthetics,

  • spent the majority of her career at Teachers College, Columbia

  • and also importantly, at the Lincoln Center Institute

  • for the Arts in Education and wrote several books,

  • including one that I quoted from,

  • Releasing the Imagination.

  • In the back of your program, you see a list

  • of three other conferences, symposiums

  • that Community MusicWorks has been involved in presenting

  • over the last 15 or 16 years.

  • Each of them really focused on Maxine's work

  • in a different way.

  • She was a speaker at two of them and was a real inspiration

  • for Community MusicWorks and many other initiatives.

  • Maxine passed away in 2014 at the age of 96.

  • And there's a group really working

  • to keep her work and legacy in the minds of people

  • in the-- practitioners in the field.

  • And Heidi Upton is the president of this Maxine Greene

  • Center for Aesthetic Education and Social Imagination.

  • So we are bringing this topic forward,

  • the legacy of Maxine Greene.

  • Though Karen and Paul aren't necessarily connected

  • to Maxine's work, it felt like the conversation

  • that we framed is very much one that Maxine would appreciate.

  • So very briefly again, bios are in the book.

  • But Heidi Upton is, as I said, the president of the Maxine

  • Greene Center and is an associate professor at St.

  • John's University in New York.

  • She'll describe more of this Discover New York class

  • that she teaches.

  • But important to the theme of the today,

  • Heidi is also an accomplished concert pianist

  • so is wearing two hats here today.

  • Karen Zone is the president of Longy School of Music,

  • which is now the Longy School of Music of Bard College and also

  • a concert pianist.

  • So there's a theme on that side of the panel here.

  • Karen was an associate provost at Berklee College of Music

  • and was at the MacPhail Center before that, really important

  • work that Karen is involved with and that she'll

  • talk about connected with the Sistema world

  • starting a MAT program to teach musicians

  • to be educators in this kind of new space

  • of Sistema-related work.

  • And we are honored that Paul Guyer

  • is with us from the Brown faculty, Johnathon Nelson

  • Professor in philosophy and humanities

  • who has recently, I think, published

  • the History of Aesthetics and will kind of provide

  • that frame for us at the end of this panel

  • into what sort of philosophical context

  • is some of this applied work.

  • So with that, let me welcome Heidi Upton.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • I need a password.

  • [INAUDIBLE]

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • OK, so much better.

  • Hi, everyone.

  • I first want to say how honored I am to be here and how excited

  • and how inspired I am so far listening to people who are not

  • just talking the talk but walking the walk

  • and really doing something.

  • This presentation that I'm about to give is a report, in a way,

  • on the partnership between-- or partnerships,

  • I should say-- between students in my course called

  • Discover New York and people who are homeless in New York City.

  • And I came to this undertaking from a position

  • at Lincoln Center Institute, which

  • is now called Lincoln Center Education, where

  • I was a teaching artist, a full-time teaching

  • artist for several years and where

  • I got to know Maxine Greene and learned

  • about aesthetic education, which is an approach to education.

  • And it is a methodology, which I'm

  • going to discuss a little bit as we move forward.

  • So the question I think that I would like to pose to you

  • and for you to think about and for me to address, first

  • of all, is this word aesthetic and the notion

  • of aesthetic experience, what that means

  • and how I think about it in my work.

  • So we're going to start with this.

  • Because this is something that I ask my students

  • at the beginning of every semester

  • is to notice the room that we're in.

  • And it's generally a room that's about that shape.

  • It's not like this room, which has a different shape.

  • But it's usually a lot right angles.

  • And it usually-- and it remarkably, looks

  • like this room, my classroom.

  • And I really have them look for a very long time

  • at the ceiling, which is filled with geometry.

  • And we begin the semester by just describing things.

  • And this is when my students think that this is really

  • a nut's course.

  • And maybe they should drop this one and take it from another.

  • Because Discover New York is something that all freshman

  • have to take at St. John's.

  • But each professor who teaches it

  • does it through their own lens of expertise.

  • And my expertise is aesthetic education.

  • So they're stuck with that.

  • So we describe the room.

  • And as I've been sitting here listening to everybody speak,

  • I've been looking at this space and thinking about situating

  • myself in its aesthetic space.

  • I think it was a line in a Beatles song.

  • You might correct me.

  • Is it, "The love you take is equal to the love you make?"

  • Do you know that line from the Revolver album?

  • Do I have it right or backwards?

  • I'm not sure.

  • But it's that philosophy.

  • It's that deep thinking.

  • It's that to the extent that one enters, that one gives oneself

  • to anything, that is to the extent that one receives.

  • And I think that's the way.

  • And Maxine used to say it with personal relationships.

  • And it's also just situating oneself in aesthetic space.

  • So I'm noticing a lot parallel lines

  • in here all over the place.

  • And I might say that there is a conversation

  • between parallel lines and horizontal and vertical.

  • So there are lot of horizontals and a lot of verticals.

  • And in my discussions with my students

  • about the room in which we sit, it moves from description

  • to analysis.

  • And then, maybe like, who decided

  • that there should be right angles

  • or that it should be this color or whatever

  • questions arise as we proceed in our inquiry

  • into aesthetic space.

  • So it's the qualities of things that I am thinking about

  • and that I want my students to think

  • about when we are thinking about aesthetic experience.

  • First, noticing the qualities of things.

  • And here is, for example, a thing, which is a shape.

  • And it's red.

  • And we could start to describe it.

  • And we could say that it's not uniform in color

  • and that there's some texture involved and everything.

  • But if you have ever read Maxine Greene's writings

  • or if you ever knew her, you know

  • that she is always referring to the work of others,

  • whether it be the work of philosophers, such as Dewey

  • and Sartre or the work of other artists.

  • And I captured this quotation from one person

  • that she references very often who

  • is Merleau-Ponty who was an existential phenomenologist.

  • Don't think that I really know what that means.

  • But that's what he was.

  • And that's what Maxine was.

  • And he is talking here about how there are so