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  • - On this episode I have a guest!

  • (bouncy music)

  • You ask questions, and I answer them.

  • This is The #AskGaryVee Show.

  • Hey everybody, this is Gary Vay-ner-chuk,

  • and this is episode 72 of The #AskGaryVee Show.

  • Or should I say, The Ask Gary and Casey Show.

  • That's right, for the first time ever,

  • you know 72 is such a symbolic number

  • that I figured we would use that to break out

  • the multiple person #AskGaryVee Show.

  • So, Case, thanks for you being the first person ever.

  • - Happy to be here, happy to be here,

  • ready for some questions.

  • - Why don't you tell the VaynerNation a little bit,

  • you know, let's call it a 72 second version

  • of who you are for the few who don't know,

  • and then we'll just get right into the questions.

  • - Okay, who I am for those who don't know.

  • I live in New York City, I work in New York City,

  • this is one of my offices, one of my companies.

  • I'm mostly known as a film maker,

  • I love making movies on the internet,

  • but I also do a lot of advertising work

  • for companies like J.Crew, and Nike, and Mercedes Benz,

  • and I also work with other companies

  • like The New York Times, making films for them.

  • How was that, was that good?

  • - That's great.

  • - I'm the father of two, I like to skateboard,

  • and yeah, that's...

  • - I mean the bottom line is, let's put it this way,

  • DRock is so excited right now that I can barely

  • deal with the tension in the room.

  • - Just try to hold the camera still.

  • - And so, you know, please go down the rabbit hole

  • that is Casey, he's an incredible storyteller,

  • and for me a lot of you know that I love talking

  • about market in the year that you actually live in,

  • this is a filmmaker, storyteller

  • in the year that we actually live in,

  • while a lot of his contemporaries,

  • and people of his talent have not recognized

  • the world we actually live in.

  • You've been one of the few that has in my opinion,

  • and for whatever that's worth, so that's how I see it.

  • - I'll take it Gary.

  • - Cool, let's get into the show.

  • - [Voiceover] Joe asks, "What advice would you give

  • "a high school senior in America

  • "trying to decide whether to go to college,

  • "and if so, which one?"

  • - Joe I'm gonna let Casey answer this first,

  • just cause I think it'd be fun to have

  • you start off the show.

  • - Yeah no, I've got a strong feeling

  • about further education, which is that

  • I think in life you should only be doing two things ever,

  • and one is like discovering what your passion is,

  • and then two is realizing it.

  • So Joe, if you know what you want to do,

  • and you're convicted that's where you want to be in life,

  • and that trajectory does not necessitate

  • a college education, then skip it.

  • Chances are you don't know what you want to do,

  • otherwise you wouldn't be asking us this question,

  • and if you don't know what you want to do

  • your responsibility is to figure that out,

  • and college is one of the best places,

  • one of the best atmospheres, environments

  • you can be in to figure out what your calling is in life,

  • to figure out what your passion is, what your purpose is.

  • - Joe, I'm gonna jump in here,

  • as the cars are racing outside,

  • and say this, I agree with a ton of what Casey said,

  • I'll also add that if you're taking $200,000 in debt

  • to find your passion, that might be a practical kind of,

  • by the way, debt that you can't even

  • declare bankruptcy against, which complete,

  • I mean, I can't even, I'm suffocated

  • by the game, the AK racket that is student loans,

  • and today in today's environment,

  • things that you and I didn't have.

  • There are other places where young people congregate,

  • and pound into each other in the serendipity

  • of finding those mentors, or contemporaries

  • that allow people to discover.

  • So look, I think one thing for sure,

  • it's fun, entrepreneur, I look at you

  • as an entrepreneurial artist, but I look at you

  • way more artistic than I me.

  • So, call it entrepreneur, artist,

  • boy there's a lot of rationale in the 2015 world

  • where college is not the right answer,

  • and I think, you know what's really been unique to me, Joe,

  • is I'm gonna give you a weird answer.

  • I acctually find that there's an enormous amount of kids,

  • and I'm spending a lot of time on this topic

  • since I was a shit student, and have made

  • something of myself, that a lot of kids

  • are still just going to college,

  • just making that decision on not wanting

  • to disappoint their parents, and that to me

  • is maybe the most fascinating thing goin' on

  • is that father of five and a two year old

  • living on the Upper East Side with elite private schools

  • where I'm paying college tuition for kindergarten already,

  • it's been funny to me, cause I'm really poking

  • and prodding the parents that are

  • my new contemporaries to see how much pressure,

  • and they have not switched yet.

  • The reason I keep talking about college

  • in a world where a lot of my friends talk about its demise

  • as more of a 20 year thing than a 10 year thing

  • is cause I still think parents of my generation

  • still value it too much for their own self esteem.

  • They want to say their kids went to Stanford,

  • and Harvard, and things of that nature.

  • So look, you've got to make your own decision,

  • but I'm with you, like discovering it,

  • and then I'd be curious, now I'm like mixing up the show,

  • what do you think about this based on your answer.

  • Because your answer is my answer,

  • and there's one other part that I'm trying to figure out.

  • I'm a big fan of practicality.

  • I think you and I got lucky that not only

  • were we able to figure out our passion,

  • but we actually had some level of talent within it.

  • There's a lot of people, a lot of the people

  • that go and try out for American Idol,

  • or the wannabe NBA players.

  • What's your point of view on Joe

  • figuring out his passion is to paint,

  • but he sucks shit at it?

  • - Well, you know, I think that

  • anyone's life, your world always shrinks

  • and expands in proportion to your willingness

  • to take risk, or try new things.

  • And that's why I think that like an academic environment

  • is a great place for trying new things

  • and experimenting with new things.

  • So, if your passion is painting,

  • and you're a terrible painter,

  • then maybe being in an environment like college

  • will open your eyes to something like graphic design

  • which doesn't involve a paint brush,

  • but you can make a great living at it,

  • and you're realizing an artistic passion

  • that is certainly inline with painting.

  • - Do you think that then one needs

  • to be challenged to make sure they go

  • into the funnel of college to recognize

  • they're not there to check those boxes?

  • Because the way you play the game

  • actually has as much to do with the game, right.

  • If you hack college in the way that you're talking about it,

  • you know, now you're starting to think about,

  • you know, course selection, you're talking about

  • the kind of group of friends that you're spending time with.

  • - Yeah, but I think college is,

  • can be a total waste of time and money

  • if not approached carefully, and I think a lot of kids today

  • go there for a lot of the wrong reasons

  • like what you're suggesting, and certainly if there

  • are better, other opportunities

  • that feel better to you than college,

  • I think now today, those opportunities are...

  • - Way more practical.

  • - Are as practical as an academic education.

  • I can tell you that a big falsehood

  • is that by going to college, you will get something else.

  • You will find success.

  • And one thing that's becoming more and more true,

  • especially as technology is opening up

  • all new means of transmission of information,

  • is that if there were a defined path to success,

  • especially in any sort of creative endeavor,

  • everyone would just follow that defined path.

  • There is no defined path.

  • And college can be a great way

  • to help you find one of those paths,

  • but it is certainly not the only way,

  • and it's certainly not a guarantee

  • that you'll find that trajectory.

  • - Yep, let's move on.

  • - [Voiceover] Andrzej asks, "How do you keep aim

  • "on your goals, and separate yourself from

  • "the demands of the external world?"

  • - Andrzej, I'll take this one first.

  • You know, I don't know what to tell you

  • other than it's unbelievable for me

  • how much the external world has not factored

  • into my decision making, I've talked about,

  • if you've been watching this show long enough

  • that first F on a test in fourth grade

  • and literally making that transition

  • to I'm gonna fight the market,

  • and I've been fighting the market my whole life.

  • I think for me, it was the level of self esteem

  • that my mom instilled in me, plus some level

  • of my own DNA, I think that's the friction at hand.

  • Heck, a lot of the themes of our last question were on this,

  • right, like what does the market want you to do,

  • whether that's your parents or society,

  • versus what you want to do.

  • For me, it has a lot to do with intestinal fortitude.

  • A Gorilla Monsoon WWF reference.

  • You know, I think it's surrounding yourself with people

  • that give you permission to take that risk.

  • That to me is the most practical version

  • of what I'm giving you,

  • other than you've got to be born with it.

  • It's finding those like minded people

  • who are taking those similar risks,

  • and give you, through their own actions,

  • a little more umph, or if you're amazingly lucky

  • to have that parental, or mentor infrastructure above you

  • that created that context.

  • Case.

  • - I think focus is everything.

  • I think that you can do 10 things poorly,

  • or one thing well, and saying, "No,"

  • is something that I only learned late in my career.

  • - I still suck at it.

  • I still suck at it right now.

  • - Saying, "No," is so hard, but the truth is

  • like we're surrounded by leeches,

  • blood suckers, and vampires, and those are people

  • that want to take, take, take, and they don't give back,

  • and learning to say, "No," to those people,

  • learning to say, "No," to all those distractions

  • is the only way to get anywhere.

  • Cause time is finite, life is short.

  • Quickly you find things in life that are really incredible,

  • like family, things that you love,

  • things that you're passionate about

  • that might distract you in a positive way

  • from your career focus.

  • So, you have to learn to shed everything else.

  • - I'm gonna throw a little bit of a curve ball.

  • I get so much happiness out of doing things for people

  • who would be, you know, categorized

  • as the way you just broke it down

  • because I have a weird gear inside of me

  • that has zero expectation for the return

  • on someone's selfishness.

  • I know that's a little bit of a mouthful,

  • but it's just, it's probably why

  • I'm so ridiculously happy.

  • I have such little expectation for the return,

  • it makes me happy to do the give,

  • I sit in front of you knowing I will accomplish

  • less in my career, and amass less wealth,

  • and a lot of other things, less time with my family,

  • which is my number one because I get so much happiness