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  • RACHEL GARB: Good afternoon.

  • Thank you so much for joining us.

  • We're really excited to be here.

  • I'm Rachel Garb, and I lead interaction design for

  • Android's apps at Google.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Hi.

  • I'm Helena Roeber, and I led Android's UX research team

  • from its beginning through 2012.

  • RACHEL GARB: Let's just jump right in, because we have a

  • lot to cover.

  • Let's start with a vision.

  • "Enchant me.

  • Simplify my life.

  • Make me amazing." If it seems a little touchy-feely, well,

  • that's intentional.

  • You see, it's about people.

  • Now of course, this is not a revelation--

  • certainly not to the people in this room.

  • Those of us in the business of creating technology for

  • people, we're well-accustomed to thinking through use cases

  • and analyzing user metrics.

  • But there's another aspect to people that may not come up as

  • much, and that's emotion.

  • We all respond emotionally to every moment we experience.

  • And according to Nobel Prize-winning scientist Daniel

  • Kahneman, we experience about 20,000 of these moments in a

  • waking day.

  • Now, we don't remember all of them, but the ones we do are

  • almost always either positive or negative.

  • Now Kahneman and other scientists are studying the

  • effects of these emotions, and here's what they're finding.

  • Negative emotions, like anger and fear and hate and shame,

  • can be harmful to your health and may even

  • shorten your lifespan.

  • Now positive emotions, on the other hand, like hope and joy

  • and love, they're an essential daily

  • requirement for survival.

  • They improve our physical and mental health, and they

  • protect us from depression and illness.

  • So as designers, every decision we make affects

  • people emotionally.

  • Now our team sees this as a huge opportunity, but also a

  • responsibility we take very seriously.

  • So about two years ago, we developed this design vision.

  • Now, you'll notice it's phrased in the first person.

  • That's intentional.

  • We want this to read not as our vision, but as the vision

  • that our users have for us.

  • Now how do we know this vision is valid?

  • Well, from all the user research we've done to date,

  • which Helena will talk about in a little bit, it really

  • boils down to these three sentences.

  • So it's a tall order.

  • What exactly does it mean to enchant me, simplify my life,

  • and make me amazing?

  • Answers can be found in Android's design principles.

  • They're based on the same research that informed our

  • vision, and they've been guiding us to create

  • beautiful, usable, and innovative designs.

  • Now, we're certain they can do the same for you, and that's

  • why we're here today.

  • So we're going to introduce you to these design principles

  • and talk about why we believe in them.

  • We'll show many examples, including from some

  • groundbreaking projects, and we'll talk about how you can

  • use them with your teams.

  • HELENA ROEBER: I will now quickly go through the

  • principles.

  • And don't worry if I'm going a little bit too fast.

  • We will later spend a lot of time on in-depth examples that

  • explain each of them.

  • The principles are grouped into the three pillars of

  • Android's vision.

  • "Enchant me" is about filling people with joy, showing them

  • beautiful visuals and graceful motions, letting them

  • customize their space, and letting them directly touch

  • objects and interact with them.

  • And here are the four design principles for "Enchant me."

  • RACHEL GARB: Delight me in surprising ways.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Real objects are more fun

  • than buttons and menus.

  • RACHEL GARB: Let me make it mine.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Get to know me.

  • The second pillar of Android's vision, "Simplify My Life," is

  • about making things easy for people, making their world

  • simple to navigate, explaining it in clear words and

  • sometimes even with pictures, and bringing attention to what

  • is essential.

  • And here are the eight principles for "Simplify My

  • Life."

  • RACHEL GARB: Keep it brief.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Pictures are faster than words.

  • RACHEL GARB: Decide for me, but let me have the final say.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Only show what I need when I need it.

  • RACHEL GARB: I should always know where I am.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Never lose my stuff.

  • RACHEL GARB: If it looks the same, it should act the same.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Only interrupt me if it's important.

  • And finally, the last pillar, "Make Me Amazing," is about

  • making people feel capable, strong, and smart, giving them

  • things that they would love to show off to their friends, and

  • making them feel like they're in charge of this powerful and

  • magical force.

  • And here are the five principles for "Make Me

  • Amazing."

  • RACHEL GARB: Give me tricks that work everywhere.

  • HELENA ROEBER: It's not my fault.

  • RACHEL GARB: Sprinkle encouragement.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Do the heavy lifting for me.

  • RACHEL GARB: Make important things fast.

  • HELENA ROEBER: Next, I'll talk a little bit about the origins

  • of the design principles, how we realized we needed them,

  • how we developed them, and the difference that they made once

  • we started to apply them.

  • During an extensive UX research project called the

  • Android Baseline Study, consisting of diaries, in-home

  • interviews, and observations, we saw the profound effect

  • that technology design had on people's lives.

  • This photo here is one of our engineers at one of the

  • in-home visits.

  • We saw when, how, and why people were using computers,

  • tablets, and mobile devices.

  • And we saw that technology had become so pervasive that

  • people had started to schedule deliberate offline times and

  • enforce them so they could spend quality time with their

  • family and friends.

  • We saw joy in people's faces when they used technology and

  • something happened that they considered magical or

  • something that brought them closer to their friends or

  • maybe something that just gave them a welcome break

  • during their day.

  • But we also saw, unfortunately, the flip side.

  • It turns out we tend to blame ourselves whenever something

  • goes wrong in technology, and we realized that all those

  • non-ideal implementations, they eroded people's

  • confidence in their own abilities and often just

  • caused sheer frustration.

  • I'm sure you have all experienced the same.

  • I certainly have experienced it myself.

  • So this was a call to Android to touch people's hearts, to

  • do more of the good stuff and to fix some of the annoyances

  • in the product.

  • So the entire Android UX team got together and started to

  • unpack what wasn't working and why, and we came

  • up with a long list.

  • And to be honest, because the team had such high aspirations

  • for their work, it was a little bit of a bummer.

  • So Rachel and I, we looked at each other, and we thought,

  • what if we turn this long list of shortcomings that bum us

  • out every time we look at it into something that actually

  • inspires us to create beautiful and usable designs?

  • So we took the long, negative list of shortcomings, and we

  • organized it.

  • We painstakingly wordsmithed and crafted it to be short,

  • memorable, and in the voice of the user.

  • Let me give you an example.

  • One of the insights from this baseline study was users are

  • overwhelmed by options and limitless flexibility.

  • So our first try at rewording this was "Don't overwhelm me

  • on the first date." So you can see, we actually have a lot of

  • fun with this.

  • But in true iterative design fashion, this was

  • not the last version.

  • So we gave it one more try, and we came up with "Only show

  • me what I need to see." And this was pretty close, but it

  • didn't have that time element that is actually really

  • important to progressive disclosure.

  • So we gave it one more try, "Only show what I need when I

  • need it," and this was a winner.

  • This is one of our design principles that we have today.

  • We started to use the design principles during Android's

  • Ice Cream Sandwich release, which is the biggest

  • qualitative jump in Android's user experience to date.