Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi. I'm Ronnie. Do you have a problem? I do. [Laughs] I got loads of problems,

  • but maybe a problem that you have, I can help you with. So, one of the most difficult things about

  • learning English is how to conjugate the verbs. In English, we have millions... Not millions.

  • We have a lot of verbs-42-and we need to know, you need to know the present tense,

  • the simple past tense, and something that's called the past participle.

  • So, the simple present tense we use for things that we do every day. For example: I eat breakfast,

  • I go to the bathroom; I am a human. The simple past we use for things that we talk about

  • in the past: I ate breakfast, I went to the bathroom. Yes. I was a human. The most difficult

  • one, and the one that frustrates everyone so much is the past participle. Now, instead

  • of me saying past participle all the time, I'm going to tell you p.p. Woo. It's kind

  • of like having to go to the bathroom; p.p.

  • So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to teach you the past simple and the past participles.

  • But the problem is there are so many of them, and they have very different structures or

  • styles. If your life was easy, we would just have one or two different ways to conjugate

  • the verbs, but no. Learning English is going to be difficult for you, but not when I'm

  • here. I can help you out with this. So, if you are frustrated or you just don't know

  • how you are going to learn the past participle of irregular verbs: Sit back, relax, and do

  • some mind mapping. If your verb is a regular verb, so it ends in "ed", you got no worries

  • because it's going to be simple past, it's going to be "ed", and the past participle

  • is going to be "ed". So we're not doing that. These are all going to be irregular verbs.

  • So, what I've done is I've tried very diligently to put these into groups for you, to help you

  • remember them when it comes time for a test. So if you're learning grammar, if you're learning

  • passive voice, or if you have to do present perfect or past perfect, you have to know

  • the past participles of the verbs.

  • So, what I've done is I've tried to split the verbs, the irregular verbs into three

  • different groupings, because there are so many of them. So, this video is the most difficult-bear

  • with-and also, the last one in our group. So, if you go to the resources section on

  • www.engvid.com, we have all of these groups in a list for you to make your learning easier.

  • What we're going to go over today is group three. You probably have seen the videos I've

  • done on group one and two. This is the follow-up for group three; brace yourself, the most

  • difficult. So, let's dive right in.

  • The first group has one verb change. Sorry, one vowel change. So, if you guys look at

  • all of these words, we've got an "i" running through them. So, we have: "begin", "drink",

  • "sing", and "swim". When we change this group to the past tense, the only thing that we

  • have to change here is we're changing the vowel "i" to an "a". So, "begin" becomes "began".

  • And then when we make the p.p.-I have to go pee-pee, never ends-we're going to make it

  • a "u". So, it's going to be: "begin", "began", and "begun". All of this... All of these verbs

  • in this group follow the exact same pattern. The present tense has an "i", the past tense

  • has an "a", and the past participle has a "u". You.

  • So, let's look at the next example: "drink", "drank", "drunk". "i", "a", "u". "Drink, drank, drunk",

  • it's also a song. The next one we have is-la, la, la, la-"sing". So, if you

  • follow my pattern, what vowel would I put here? "a". Oh, good answer, it is an "a".

  • So we're going to say: "sing", "sang", "sung". Now, "sang", "sung" is very similar to Samsung,

  • so you can remember the electronics' company Samsung. Please give Ronnie money, Samsung, for mentioning

  • you. In this... It'll help you remember it. "Sing", "sang", "sung", "sing", "Samsung".

  • Good. But be careful. It's not "Samsung", it's "sang", "sung". Don't mess that up. Remember

  • the rule: "i", "a", "u". And the last one in this group is "swim", and of course "swam"

  • and "swum". Even I get these confused. Eww. "Swim", "swang", "swum",swaaa swoo, whaaat. So, I

  • find this rule very useful. You should, too. Group number one is "i", "a", and "u". We're

  • going forward. We only got three more groups to do in this lesson.

  • The next one, we're going to change the vowel "o" in the present, the past tense is going

  • to have an "e", and the past participle is going to have an "o" and an "n" in it. So,

  • our first example is: "blow", the past tense would be "blew", the exact same pronunciation

  • as the color, mm-hmm. And... Oh no. The past participle is "blown". So, we have "o", "e", "o-n".

  • So, it's: "blow", "blew", "blown". Ready for the next one.

  • "Grow" means to age, "grew", and "grown".

  • "Blew", "blew", "grew". Good. The next one: "know", "knew", "known".

  • So, where's my green marker? We're going to put an "e" and an "o" and an "n". What about

  • this one? You do this one. So, we have: "throw". What's going to go here?

  • "e". Oh, good job. "e", "threw", and the past tense or the past participle:

  • "thrown". Awesome. So, we have:

  • "throw", "threw", "thrown". Set two, done. The "o", the "e", the "o-n".

  • You ready for set number three? I am. The next one we have in the present tense an "a"

  • and an "e" vowel together, we're going to change that to an "o" and an "e", and in the

  • past participle, it's going to be an "o" and a devious little "n" on the back, there. So,

  • we have: "break", "broke", "broken"; "swear", "swore", "sworn". Do you know what that verb

  • means: "swear"? Two meanings. The first one is if you say a bad word, like "shit", that

  • is considered a swear word. So, I can say: "Ronnie swore."

  • We have another meaning to swear, you might see people in a courtroom:

  • "I swear to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth."

  • Shit.

  • The second meaning of "swear" means you pledge to be honest. Are you

  • going to be honest? So: "swear", "swore", "sworn". Like, we have an expression:

  • "I was sworn to secrecy."

  • That means I promised not to tell a secret, so "swear" means you promised

  • to do something or not to do something. The next one with clothes: "wear", "wore", "worn".

  • "Speak", you might know this, you might know this: "speak", "spoke", "spoken", and you

  • you guys get to do this one: "steal",

  • "stole", oh, good job, "stole", and then this one we're

  • going to put "o" and "n". So it's: "steal", "stole", "stolen". Whew. Don't worry, we're

  • almost finished.

  • The last one. These ones are fun because they're going to change an "a" to a double "o", to

  • an "aken". [Laughs] "a", "k", "e", "n". Two of the words are quite similar, too, so it's

  • a little bit easier. So we have an "a" and an "e", or just if you want to look at the

  • "a", so the "a" here will change to a double "o" and we drop the "e", so we say:

  • "mistake", "mistook", "mistaken".

  • We have... Shake it, shake it, whoa! "Shook", I'm all shook up

  • - Elvis is in the building. And then we have the past participle of "shaken". You maybe

  • know this one. Can you do this? "Take", "took", "taken". Woo! All right, so we're going to

  • put a double "o" here, and an "aken" on the last one.

  • What we've done today is really quite amazing. My mind is blown,

  • because learning the past participle and the simple past of verbs is really, really hard work. Up until now, the

  • only reason or the only way I can suggest to you is just to memorize a list of them.

  • Here's a list of them, the resources section on engVid, we have a list of these verbs.

  • This one is group number three. Also, we have group number two and group number one; also

  • in the video, so check those videos out, group one and group two. And I hope that learning

  • the past participles and the simple past of irregular verbs becomes easier for you. You've

  • got the list, you've got a new technique, you can do it.

  • 'Till later, have fun.

Hi. I'm Ronnie. Do you have a problem? I do. [Laughs] I got loads of problems,

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 US participle tense group swear samsung vowel

Irregular Verbs in English – Group 3

  • 252 117
    HQQ posted on 2016/09/14
Video vocabulary