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  • CHAPTER 1 Down the Rabbit Hole

  • Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing

  • to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no

  • pictures or conversations in it, 'and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice 'without

  • pictures or conversation?'

  • So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her

  • feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy chain would be

  • worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit

  • with pink eyes ran close by her.

  • There was nothing so VERY remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so VERY much out of

  • the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, 'Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!' (when

  • she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at

  • this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually TOOK

  • A WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT POCKET, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started

  • to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with

  • either a waistcoat pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she

  • ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large

  • rabbit hole under the hedge.

  • In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she

  • was to get out again.

  • The rabbit hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down,

  • so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found

  • herself falling down a very deep well.

  • Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as

  • she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she

  • tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything;

  • then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards

  • and bookshelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down

  • a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled 'ORANGE MARMALADE', but to

  • her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing

  • somebody, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

  • 'Well!' thought Alice to herself, 'after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling

  • down stairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about

  • it, even if I fell off the top of the house!' (Which was very likely true.)

  • Down, down, down. Would the fall NEVER come to an end! 'I wonder how many miles I've fallen

  • by this time?' she said aloud. 'I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth.

  • Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think' (for, you see, Alice had learnt

  • several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not

  • a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to

  • her, still it was good practice to say it over) 'yes, that's about the right distancebut

  • then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude

  • was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.)

  • Presently she began again. 'I wonder if I shall fall right THROUGH the earth! How funny

  • it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies,

  • I think' (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as it didn't sound

  • at all the right word) 'but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is,

  • you know. Please, Ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?' (and she tried to curtsey as

  • she spokefancy CURTSEYING as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage

  • it?) 'And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to

  • ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.'

  • Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. 'Dinah'll

  • miss me very much tonight, I should think!' (Dinah was the cat.) 'I hope they'll remember

  • her saucer of milk at tea time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are

  • no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse,

  • you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?' And here Alice began to get rather sleepy,

  • and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, 'Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat

  • bats?' and sometimes, 'Do bats eat cats?' for, you see, as she couldn't answer either

  • question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off,

  • and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her

  • very earnestly, 'Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?' when suddenly, thump!

  • thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

  • Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up,

  • but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit

  • was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice

  • like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, 'Oh my ears

  • and whiskers, how late it's getting!' She was close behind it when she turned the corner,

  • but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was

  • lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

  • There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all

  • the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle,

  • wondering how she was ever to get out again.

  • Suddenly she came upon a little three legged table, all made of solid glass; there was

  • nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong

  • to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key

  • was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time

  • round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little

  • door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to

  • her great delight it fitted!

  • Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than

  • a rat hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you

  • ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds

  • of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through

  • the doorway; 'and even if my head would go through,' thought poor Alice, 'it would be

  • of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope!

  • I think I could, if I only know how to begin.' For, you see, so many out of the way things

  • had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were

  • really impossible.

  • There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table,

  • half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting

  • people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it, ('which certainly was

  • not here before,' said Alice,) and round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with

  • the words 'DRINK ME' beautifully printed on it in large letters.

  • It was all very well to say 'Drink me,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do

  • THAT in a hurry. 'No, I'll look first,' she said, 'and see whether it's marked "poison"

  • or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt,

  • and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they WOULD not remember

  • the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red hot poker will burn

  • you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger VERY deeply with a knife,

  • it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked

  • 'poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.

  • However, this bottle was NOT marked 'poison,' so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding

  • it very nice, (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry tart, custard, pineapple,

  • roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast,) she very soon finished it off.

  • 'What a curious feeling!' said Alice; 'I must be shutting up like a telescope.'

  • And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at

  • the thought that she was now the right size for going through the little door into that

  • lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going

  • to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; 'for it might end, you know,'

  • said Alice to herself, 'in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like

  • then?' And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown

  • out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.

  • After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once;

  • but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the

  • little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not

  • possibly reach it: she could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her

  • best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had

  • tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried.

  • 'Come, there's no use in crying like that!' said Alice to herself, rather sharply; 'I

  • advise you to leave off this minute!' She generally gave herself very good advice, (though

  • she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring

  • tears into her eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated

  • herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was

  • very fond of pretending to be two people. 'But it's no use now,' thought poor Alice,

  • 'to pretend to be two people! Why, there's hardly enough of me left to make ONE respectable

  • person!'

  • Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table: she opened it,

  • and found in it a very small cake, on which the words 'EAT ME' were beautifully marked

  • in currants. 'Well, I'll eat it,' said Alice, 'and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach

  • the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way

  • I'll get into the garden, and I don't care which happens!'

  • She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself, 'Which way? Which way?', holding

  • her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing, and she was quite surprised

  • to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this generally happens when one eats

  • cake, but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out of the way things

  • to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go on in the common way.

  • So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.

  • End of Chapter 1

  • CHAPTER 2 The Pool of Tears

  • 'Curiouser and curiouser!' cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment

  • she quite forgot how to speak good English); 'now I'm opening out like the largest telescope

  • that ever was! Good-bye, feet!' (for when she looked down at her feet, they seemed to

  • be almost out of sight, they were getting so far off). 'Oh, my poor little feet, I wonder

  • who will put on your shoes and stockings for you now, dears? I'm sure I shan't be able!

  • I shall be a great deal too far off to trouble myself about you: you must manage the best

  • way you can; but I must be kind to them,' thought Alice, 'or perhaps they won't walk

  • the way I want to go! Let me see: I'll give them a new pair of boots every Christmas.'

  • And she went on planning to herself how she would manage it. 'They must go by the carrier,'

  • she thought; 'and how funny it'll seem, sending presents to one's own feet! And how odd the

  • directions will look!

  • ALICE'S RIGHT FOOT, ESQ. HEARTHRUG,

  • NEAR THE FENDER, (WITH ALICE'S LOVE).

  • Oh dear, what nonsense I'm talking!'

  • Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in fact she was now more than

  • nine feet high, and she at once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the garden

  • door.

  • Poor Alice! It was as much as she could do, lying down on one side, to look through into

  • the garden with one eye; but to get through was more hopeless than ever: she sat down

  • and began to cry again.

  • 'You ought to be ashamed of yourself,' said Alice, 'a great girl like you,' (she might

  • well say this), 'to go on crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you!' But she went

  • on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until there was a large pool all round her,

  • about four inches deep and reaching half down the hall.

  • After a time she heard a little pattering of feet in the distance, and she hastily dried

  • her eyes to see what was coming. It was the White Rabbit returning, splendidly dressed,

  • with a pair of white kid gloves in one hand and a large fan in the other: he came trotting

  • along in a great hurry, muttering to himself as he came, 'Oh! the Duchess, the Duchess!

  • Oh! won't she be savage if I've kept her waiting!' Alice felt so desperate that she was ready

  • to ask help of any one; so, when the Rabbit came near her, she began, in a low, timid

  • voice, 'If you please, sir ' The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid gloves and

  • the fan, and skurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go.

  • Alice took up the fan and gloves, and, as the hall was very hot, she kept fanning herself

  • all the time she went on talking: 'Dear, dear! How queer everything is today! And yesterday

  • things went on just as usual. I wonder if I've been changed in the night? Let me think:

  • was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little

  • different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, THAT'S

  • the great puzzle!' And she began thinking over all the children she knew that were of

  • the same age as herself, to see if she could have been changed for any of them.

  • 'I'm sure I'm not Ada,' she said, 'for her hair goes in such long ringlets, and mine

  • doesn't go in ringlets at all; and I'm sure I can't be Mabel, for I know all sorts of

  • things, and she, oh! she knows such a very little! Besides, SHE'S she, and I'm I, and

  • oh dear, how puzzling it all is! I'll try if I know all the things I used to know. Let

  • me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven

  • is oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate! However, the Multiplication Table

  • doesn't signify: let's try Geography. London is the capital of Paris, and Paris is the

  • capital of Rome, and Rome no, THAT'S all wrong, I'm certain! I must have been changed for

  • Mabel! I'll try and say "How doth the little "' and she crossed her hands on her lap as

  • if she were saying lessons, and began to repeat it, but her voice sounded hoarse and strange,

  • and the words did not come the same as they used to do:

  • 'How doth the little crocodile Improve his shining tail,

  • And pour the waters of the Nile On every golden scale!

  • 'How cheerfully he seems to grin, How neatly spread his claws,

  • And welcome little fishes in With gently smiling jaws!'

  • 'I'm sure those are not the right words,' said poor Alice, and her eyes filled with

  • tears again as she went on, 'I must be Mabel after all, and I shall have to go and live

  • in that poky little house, and have next to no toys to play with, and oh! ever so many

  • lessons to learn! No, I've made up my mind about it; if I'm Mabel, I'll stay down here!

  • It'll be no use their putting their heads down and saying "Come up again, dear!" I shall

  • only look up and say "Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that

  • person, I'll come up: if not, I'll stay down here till I'm somebody else" but, oh dear!'

  • cried Alice, with a sudden burst of tears, 'I do wish they WOULD put their heads down!

  • I am so VERY tired of being all alone here!'

  • As she said this she looked down at her hands, and was surprised to see that she had put

  • on one of the Rabbit's little white kid gloves while she was talking. 'How CAN I have done

  • that?' she thought. 'I must be growing small again.' She got up and went to the table to

  • measure herself by it, and found that, as nearly as she could guess, she was now about

  • two feet high, and was going on shrinking rapidly: she soon found out that the cause

  • of this was the fan she was holding, and she dropped it hastily, just in time to avoid

  • shrinking away altogether.

  • 'That WAS a narrow escape!' said Alice, a good deal frightened at the sudden change,

  • but very glad to find herself still in existence; 'and now for the garden!' and she ran with

  • all speed back to the little door: but, alas! the little door was shut again, and the little

  • golden key was lying on the glass table as before, 'and things are worse than ever,'

  • thought the poor child, 'for I never was so small as this before, never! And I declare

  • it's too bad, that it is!'

  • As she said these words her foot slipped, and in another moment, splash! she was up

  • to her chin in salt water. Her first idea was that she had somehow fallen into the sea,

  • 'and in that case I can go back by railway,' she said to herself. (Alice had been to the

  • seaside once in