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  • "Every man has the potential (and woman) for a great..." Hi. James from engVid.

  • Just let me finish. I'm going to take a quick swig. Oh, good. I want to talk about drinks.

  • I should talk about drinks. This coffee smells amazing. One more sip.

  • I said "swig" and "sip," and you're probably thinking they're the same, but if you notice

  • what I did when I took a swig; when I took a sip, maybe a taste. What?

  • They're different; not the same. And if you ever take a swig of my beer when I offer you a sip,

  • I won't be happy.

  • Let's go to the board and find out: What the heck did I just say? Okay?

  • What the hell, talk about drinks. E drank too much. Yup, yup, yup, he did. He should have just sipped his beer,

  • he would have been okay. I have some drawings on the board, and what we're going to do is go through drink:

  • When we drink, what do we say? What is the difference when we use these words?

  • And how you should use them so you can sound like a native. Right?

  • If you look over here, it says: "eat." There is a video, go check it out, and it has all

  • the words for "eat" and how we went from little eating, like "nibble," to a lot, like "gorge," and that was there.

  • It's going to be done in the same way. And if you noticed, when you looked here, there were a few words.

  • And I've added a couple. You're going to say:

  • "Wow, I didn't see these words before." And you're right, the words you didn't see were:

  • "guzzle," "choke," and "consume." These are three new words. But when you drink or eat,

  • we will use these words as well. Right? We talked about the Venn diagram

  • showing words that are different and words that are similar to both.

  • In this case, "guzzle," if I'm guzzling my coffee... I won't now because it's hot, but

  • I'd be like: "[Gulps]," because maybe I have to go somewhere. It means to drink greedily.

  • So, like an animal, drink greedily or quickly. "Choke" is this: "[Coughs and chokes]."

  • You can guzzle down food, you can choke on food, you can do the same with liquids.

  • If I'm eating a sandwich and I choke. But I can choke by drinking the liquid. We say:

  • "Goes the wrong way." And, you're like: "So, how are you doing Mr....? [Coughs and chokes].I am choking."

  • "Choke."

  • "Consume" is a word that means to eat or drink or use up. I put this word specifically because

  • you'll hear it when people talk about buying things, they're consuming. It means they're using it up.

  • When you eat or drink, guess what? You're using it up. If you look carefully,

  • there's no coffee because I've consumed it. So if someone said he consumed a lot of alcohol,

  • or meat, or something, it means they used it up or finished it - "to consume." Cool?

  • Glad you like it, because now it's time to talk about the words.

  • So, where are we? A "little." A "little" is a taste. Imagine your tongue. All right?

  • Rolling Stones, don't sue me. Okay? When you taste something, it's just like putting just a small amount here.

  • "Ah, I like that." Because sometimes you see somebody drinking a blue drink with a green thing on top.

  • You don't want to drink that, but it looks interesting, so you might want to taste.

  • And you will go like this: "Mmm" or "Ugh." "Can I have a taste?" If someone

  • says: "Can I have a taste?" or "Do you want to taste it?" you shouldn't take a lot. Just

  • a little bit to put on your tongue and get a taste of it. Please don't put your finger in my drink to taste it.

  • Put your tongue. Okay? So you can see this one is a taste.

  • Okay? Bang. That's right. Bang on the head, we got to do the next one.

  • What is a "sip"? I'm a nice guy and I'm sure you're a nice guy,

  • so your friend comes and he goes: "Hey, man, you're drinking a beer. Can I have a sip?"

  • A "sip" is a little drink. See the ant? Imagine an ant drinking.

  • It's not going to drink a whole cup of coffee. It's going to have a sip.

  • That means you're allowed to do this and stop. I can repeat. Ready? There we go. Stop.

  • If you're still going like a plane, we have a problem. I won't be happy. A sip means this.

  • But here's something to help you really remember. Imagine you're at a club, at a dance club,

  • a very expensive club and this drink is $200. Do you think I'm going to drink a lot?

  • Nope. I'm going to sip it all night long, because I cannot buy another $200 drink.

  • I don't have a lot of money. So usually when you sip something it could be expensive, like a very nice wine,

  • and you sip it. You sip to get a nice feeling or taste of the flavour,

  • but also it's very expensive, I cannot afford it. Okay? So a "sip" is more than a "taste."

  • Think of an ant, you're allowed you have a little drink. Right? But not too much.

  • So if your friend says: "Do you want a sip of my beer?" don't drink a lot.

  • He'll get angry. He said "sip." Think ant. Okay?

  • "Shot." Some of you guys go out, and I've heard many of students ask me:

  • "I go to the bar and we have shots."

  • Now, there's a song I can't remember by Lil Jon or something:

  • "Shot, shot, shot." You'll get a glass that looks like this. It looks like that. A regular glass looks like this.

  • If you look at this, it looks like a bullet from a gun. Why is it called a "shot"?

  • Because in this little thing they put some very strong alcohol, and you do this, and take a shot.

  • It's like being: "[Shooting noise]"... Being hit by a gun.

  • If I shoot that gun-bam-you got shot: "Ooph," you're going to feel it. When you take a shot of alcohol,

  • it's strong and you usually go... It's funny. Anybody who takes a shot,

  • they go: "[Gulps] Ur, ugh." You go: "What's wrong with them?" They're like: "It's good."

  • Nothing is good that makes you go: "Ugh." It's like getting hit by that sound on my head-boom, boom-repeatedly.

  • Not good. It's a shot. Shot to the head.

  • But they take shots to get drunk, because three shots, you're done. Okay? So we took shots.

  • So you take a shot of alcohol. It's usually strong, small and strong.

  • A "swig" is different. "Swig" actually means drink. If you take a swig of something, you're going to: "[Swallows]."

  • Enough for a mouthful. A swig. Take a drink. Right? Some people say: "Hey, I didn't tell you to swig my beer.

  • And don't drink it. I didn't ask you to drink it. You're starting to drink.

  • I asked you if you want a sip. Want a swig? Buy your own."

  • Swig, drink.

  • "Slug," you notice it's the last one? So where have we have here drink? Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo.

  • "Swig," your normal drink. See little red one? Happy? You're taking a drink.

  • for really a good friend, maybe I'll let you have a swig of my drink, but

  • most likely I'll let you have a sip - that's all. Finally: "slug."

  • Dunh-dunh-da-da-dunh- -da-da-dunh-dunh-dunh. Dunh-dunh-da-da-dunh-da-da-- dunh-dunh-dunh-da-da-da-da.

  • Rocky, right? Rocky would slug ya. Now, you're --Slug, that's hit.-

  • Yeah, because when you slug it back, it's going to be something like this.

  • I can't do it with this, because if I do this, the coffee will be all over me.

  • But usually with a cold drink or a beer... I hope I don't die.

  • You slug it back, you go: "Guys, we have to go in five minutes. I have to slug this back."

  • Think of getting hit, because you're going to go: [Quickly gulps],

  • and they'll go: "Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!" [Gulps]. Done.

  • So a shot is - done; a slug is - done. You slug it back. Boom, big hit.

  • You take a big hit and it's gone. You take all of the drink and you finish.

  • You slug it back. Right? So you got your slug. And, Batman, if you remember Batman from the 70s:

  • "Na-na-na-na-na-na-na-na. Bam! Pow!" Slug it back. Take a heavy hit. All right?

  • So our slug was number three, it goes here.

  • So we've learned five words to drink, and three common words for eating and drinking

  • when we're consuming, choking-don't choke-and guzzling it back. I would like to do a little bit more,

  • because we're going to use some other words and learn a little bit about alcohol.

  • Because after all, we don't just drink water. Man and woman cannot live by water alone.

  • Are you ready? Let's go for a drink.

  • [Snaps]

  • Hey. And just like real magic, I got a new cup. Let's go to the board. We talk

  • about drinking and how you drink. Right? Sipping, swig, guzzle. And I want to talk about

  • two other things that are related to those things. One is: What kind of drinker are you?

  • The other is what kind of things you can drink. We're saying "drink," but that's actually

  • officially called or we call it here, especially if you go to restaurants, "beverages." So

  • we might say: "What beverage would you like?" You probably heard it on the airplane. She'd say

  • "Would you like something to drink?" or "What kind of beverages do you have?" Okay?

  • And that would be: What type of drink?

  • So, we're going to look right over here. Let's start with the most basic beverages. Okay?

  • "Water." "What kind of water? Water's water." Oh my poor, poor friend who just learned English.

  • Water is water until you have to pay for it. If you're in a restaurant, you will get offered water.

  • If you say: "Yes," they will say: "Would you like still or sparkling?" Let me go back.

  • They might say: "Would you like water or bottled water?"

  • Of course, my poor friend, you're thinking: "Water, bottle? What's the difference?"

  • Water comes from the tap. You know when you turn on the water in your house?

  • That's for free. Bottled water, and they usually serve it just like this...

  • Because it's the same water in a bottle - that's for money, and a lot of it.

  • Now, when you get that water, remember I said "still" and "sparkling"?

  • They will offer you two types of water. "Would you like still water?" That is water that doesn't move,

  • that's the water you get from your tap. Sparkling has bubbles-oo-that'll cost you more.

  • Just tell them: "Give me still, I'll blow and make bubbles for sparkling.

  • Thank you very much. Better yet, give me the tap water"-because it's called tap water-"and I'll blow in that for free."

  • Okay? I joke, but it's true. So if you ask for water, they'll say,

  • "Would you like bottled or water?" That means from the tap that you have your shower and bath from.

  • Right? That water. They'll say: "Still or sparkling?" Sparkling is with bubbles,

  • and still means not moving, just regular water. Go for the still water from the tap.

  • Next. At the end of your meal, usually you'll have tea or coffee. I'm sure you guys have that.

  • Right? Coffee has caffeine or a lot more caffeine, strong flavour; and

  • the tea can come as regular tea or flavoured teas that can taste like fruits,

  • and other nice stuff. I, personally, like Earl Grey.

  • Cream of Earl Grey, if you're listening. Okay? And then for the kids,

  • we usually do juice or milk, and these we call beverages.

  • So juice or milk for your little kid, you know, apple juice or orange juice. Right?

  • Other juices as well, but those are the basic ones - apple, orange, milk, water, tea, coffee.

  • If you go to a bar, all of a sudden things change a bit. We don't want to talk about water.

  • You don't go to a bar and order a tea. The bartender will go: -"What you want to drink?"

  • -"Tea." -"Okay. I said: What do you want to drink?" -"Tea."

  • -"I said Starbucks is over there. What do you want to drink?"

  • -"Uh... I better order something... A soft drink." "Soft drink"?

  • What's a soft drink? A "soft drink" means no alcohol. Think Coca-Cola, Sprite, Ginger ale.

  • These are soft drinks, there's no alcohol. They have bubbles, they are sweet, they taste nice.

  • Another word for "soft drink" is "pop." You might have a pop.

  • Right? Pop. Coke, yeah, Sprites, Ginger ale. Where do we go from there?

  • Well, after you finish with a soft drink, you really want to talk about beer and wine.

  • So, I'm sorry, just before I do that, I want to move on to Coke. Because I said Coke, I

  • was thinking coke, not [sniffs] coke, but, you know, Coca-Cola. Cola is general.

  • If you go anywhere and you say: "I want a cola," they'll ask you for Pepsi Cola, Coca-Cola.

  • But if I write this word down, I have to put a capital, because Coca-Cola will be angry and say:

  • "That's our brand. It's Coca-Cola. You want cola? You write cola." But everybody

  • knows Coke and Pepsi. So there, that's our soft drinks, our pop. Not poop, but pop.

  • You don't want poop at the bar. Okay. Thank you. Yes. Every time I make a mistake, they're like

  • "Bang. That's not funny." See, he says: "Not funny, stop it with the jokes." Okay.

  • Next-beer and wine. Beer and wine are with alcohol. That means when you drink it,

  • it changes how you feel. It makes you a little happier, a little bit more relaxed.

  • Wine is people usually have one or two, and you relax and have it with meals.

  • Beer can happen usually with a hot dog or, you know, a steak.

  • But also, beer you might have it at, you know,

  • when you're doing work around the house or gardening. Unless you're in Italy. In Italy, they have wine with everything.

  • Right? -"Hey, papa. I'm going to the washroom. Give me some wine."

  • -"Okay, son, I'll see you later." Okay? Sorry, but that's Italy. The rest of us, we drink beer, you know,

  • hanging out with the friends on the front stoop, and our wine we have with dinner and sitting down.

  • And that's the way North Americans play it, usually.

  • Okay? You won't see them cutting the grass and drinking wine, it just doesn't work. Okay?

  • But your beer, they might. By the way, don't drink, drive, drive your motorcycle, or

  • cut your grass, or anything with alcohol. I didn't say do that.

  • Now we have hard liquor. Notice we went from here to here. You said: "What's the difference between hard liquor?"

  • Hard liquor is your vodka. Yeah? You Russians, you love vodka. Your rye and your whiskey.

  • If you're Scottish, you drink whiskey. I probably sound Irish.

  • Okay? And your rye, Canadian rye. These are harder because they're stronger. They're also called "spirits."

  • Interesting little story to help you remember the difference or why they're different:

  • An ounce of liquor is worth five ounces of beer and maybe even eight ounces of... Sorry.

  • Five ounces of wine and eight ounces of beer. And you go: "Alcohol is alcohol."

  • No. Why they're called different things is how they're made. And this is... Tells you how strong they are.

  • When you make beer and wine, they put them in sort of like a big bottle.

  • They call it a "vat," something like this. They put it in, they close it, and they put some organism,

  • some things in there or little buggies, and they make the grapes and the wheat or the barley

  • change into beer and create alcohol. Right? Okay, well, whatever. Yeah, I know.

  • But listen carefully. That's a different way of making the alcohol than when they make hard liquor.

  • They actually, when they take hard liquor, they take something like a rye or barley and they boil it.

  • They actually add heat to it. What happens is it becomes stronger,

  • and that's why they call it hard liquor. Even though this has alcohol in it, they say:

  • "This is hard, because five ounces of this and five ounces of that are not the same thing."

  • That's why you take shots of this. Nobody takes shots of wine. Maybe in France.

  • "Oui, oui. Ah, this is very good." But in Canada, you take a shot of whiskey because it's stronger or JD.

  • Okay? So, spirits and hard liquor you take, because it's stronger, less of it.

  • It'll get you drunk, one ounce to two ounces. These, you have more. Okay?

  • So you might want to say, you know: "I don't want any hard liquor." Then they'll say:

  • "You want beer or wine"-okay?-"with your meal?"

  • So we've done the types of drinks or, you know, soft drinks, beverages, wine, and beer,

  • but what kind of drinker are you? It's a good question. Are you a "teetotaler"? No. That is two says: "No,"

  • he's not a teetotaler. "Teetotaler," remember we talked about tea? So, you think:

  • "Ah, a teetotaler, I don't drink." It means to not drink any alcohol whatsoever. Yeah. Hard. Right?

  • That means no beer, no wine, no rye, no vodka; you never drink.

  • "I'm a teetotaler. I am against drinking."

  • "Abstain" means I don't drink. It doesn't mean I'm a teetotaler. That's not the same.

  • A teetotaler will not drink. I can abstain from drinking tonight, I have to drive my car.

  • So when you abstain, it means you stay away from, but not necessarily never drink. Okay?

  • So you have friends who abstain from drinking when they're driving, but they will

  • drink at home or at a baseball game. Right?

  • Or they might abstain for religious reasons because it's that time of the year.

  • But it doesn't mean they never drink. Teetotalers do not drink ever.

  • A "social drinker" drinks when he's with friends. This is kind of the best kind of drinking.

  • You're at home with your friend, playing your video game, you both share a beer. Great.

  • You go out to the bar, you have two or three beers. Cool, no problem. Social drinker. You

  • have wine with your dinner. No problem. "I drink socially." It means the alcohol is something we share in an event.

  • The event is more important than the alcohol. All right? So we go to the bar to drink.

  • We have one beer to drink, we call it to loosen up, to get relaxed, and

  • then we dance all night. We're not there to drink all night.

  • "Drunk," a lot of you guys know this word if you do drink. Right? It's a past participle.

  • We have "drink," "drank," "drunk." You've heard it before. You've had to do the little tables.

  • But I'm using it as a noun, and I'm not sure if you've seen this, because a "drunk"

  • is a person who drinks too much. They might drink at work, they might drink after work,

  • they might drink before bed. So you say they're a drunk because they're usually on alcohol.

  • Okay? So they're always... You see how I'm carrying this? If you watch the video, I had a cup of coffee.

  • It wasn't coffee. Now I have this, it's bigger. It's not coffee. I'm a drunk,

  • which means pretty soon I'll be walking around like this, and I'll be talking like this.

  • So "drunk" can be a state that you're in. You are drunk, you've had too much alcohol, stop drinking.

  • Or if you are a drunk, or this word-see?-it comes from "drunkard," you drink too much.