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  • Hey guys!

  • Today, it’s just me making a video by myself.

  • And I have another issue that’s in the news

  • to talk to you guys about.

  • You may have heard of it.

  • If you have not,

  • the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan,

  • a.k.a. GSI,

  • which is essentially just Japan’s, like, map makers,

  • have released a new set of icons to be used

  • on Japanese maps for foreigners.

  • And you may be wondering, like,

  • “I don’t care, Rachel. Why do I care?”

  • At least one of the symbols that theyre changing

  • is kind of controversial in a way.

  • And I was going to talk to you guys

  • about it at some point,

  • and I figured, now is as good a time as ever.

  • So, to give you guys little a bit of background

  • on why theyre doing this,

  • Japan is hosting the Olympics in 2020,

  • so theyve really been trying

  • to globalise the country more

  • and make it more foreigner-friendly.

  • Some of the symbols that they use on maps

  • right now are very Japanese-specific.

  • So, one thing that theyve been doing

  • over the past couple of years is,

  • theyve been conducting surveys and interviews

  • of foreigners, who are, like, exchange students, or

  • people who work at embassies here

  • or even just tourists.

  • And theyve been showing them several different

  • symbols on the Japanese maps and asking them

  • how easy it is to understand them.

  • And so, that’s where theyve come up with

  • these new symbols that they just released.

  • They didn’t just make it out of nowhere

  • and be like, “These are the symbols were picking!”

  • Theyve actually been doing a lot of work and research,

  • trying to figure out what the absolute best symbols

  • would be for foreigners.

  • You can find the whole report on their website,

  • and I’ll link to it down below

  • if you guys want to check it out.

  • They go into great detail on everything they have done.

  • Obviously, it’s in Japanese,

  • so if you don’t speak Japanese,

  • you can still understand some of it just by looking

  • at the pictures and numbers and stuff.

  • So, for example, one symbols that Japan

  • has traditionally been using on their maps is

  • an H in a circle, which stands forhotel”.

  • However, for a lot of foreigners, we may

  • see that as something likehospital”,

  • or, for me personally, “helicopter pad”!

  • That’s what I imagined.

  • They have conducted several levels of surveys,

  • but the most recent survey

  • they showed the original symbol plus a new one,

  • which shows a person sleeping in a bed with a lamp,

  • and asked,

  • Which one of these is more understandable

  • as meaning a ‘hotel’?”

  • And overall 61% of people said,

  • the person sleeping in a bed is a much easier

  • symbol to understand, whereas only 18% of people

  • said, “Oh yeah, I can gethotelfrom the H in a circle.”

  • Still, the little sleeping man symbol is the one

  • of the new symbols that they are proposing be used.

  • Another symbol, probably one of the most difficult

  • symbols for non-Japanese people to understand,

  • is the original police box symbol in Japan.

  • It’s just an X.

  • So, if we saw an X on a map,

  • I would think, like, “Treasure?

  • Is there a buried treasure here, or something?”

  • I wouldn’t really know what it was.

  • Actually, I didn’t even know, this was a police box symbol, so

  • I guess I suck at living in Japan

  • because… I never learnt that.

  • Here you can see that only 4 % of people said,

  • they understand an X, whereas they have a little

  • sheriff star. 27 % of people said that was okay.

  • And then, like, a little police officer, and

  • 33 % said that was the most easily understable symbol.

  • One thing they have done is write down comments,

  • so, of course, they have a more complete understanding

  • of why people voted the way they did.

  • So, for this police box symbol,

  • someone from Sweden said, “X makes no sense.”

  • Someone from Germany said, “No. 2 is better,

  • but it’s kind of complicated.

  • Another one of the symbols they are changing

  • is the symbol for postbox.

  • And the symbol forpostboxhere is the katakanate

  • in a circle, which we obviously don’t use abroad.

  • So, they have proposed changing it to just a letter.

  • Most people make comments like, “Foreigners who

  • haven’t been to Japan aren’t going to understand

  • the symbol.” Which I also think is true.

  • So, let’s move on to the number one symbol

  • that people are debating right now.

  • Whereas all the other symbols, that they are proposing

  • changing, I completely understand the new symbol

  • that they have proposed, and I think, honestly,

  • a lot of those will really help foreigners

  • who are coming here.

  • This symbol is debatable.

  • And that would be theswastika’.

  • I’m sure most of you know this,

  • but if you don’t, the swastika was originally

  • a Hindu-Buddhist symbol.

  • It may have been used for other things even before that,

  • but it’s thousands and thousand of years old.

  • So, this is a very, like, sacred, religious symbol

  • that has been around for a long time

  • before it was adopted by Nazis, and, then,

  • like, the whole image of it was completely destroyed.

  • But whereas in the West, we don’t have a lot

  • of Buddhism and Hinduism,

  • so were not familiar with that history of the swastika,

  • here in Japan there are a lot of Buddhist temples!

  • And a lot of Japanese are personally Buddhists,

  • so they are extremely familiar with the symbol

  • and if they see the swastika, their first thoughts

  • are going to Buddhism and not to Nazism,

  • like a lot of foreignerswould.

  • If you have been to Japan and you have used

  • Google Maps to look up temples to go to,

  • you’d have seen this symbol all the time.

  • Sometimes youll actually

  • see it at the temples themselves.

  • And so, if you are not familiar with it,

  • some foreigners can get confused and

  • maybe kind ofoffended?

  • But this is the one symbol that I personally

  • I think it’s really sad that they would have to change

  • this symbol because it has such an intense

  • religious history to it!

  • I mean… I feel like we are losing

  • to the bad guys, like, why should

  • the Nazis still be winning at something?

  • It’s not fair that they took the symbol

  • and then made it something horrible.

  • I would prefer that they left it as a swastika

  • because if a foreigner comes to Japan

  • and they don’t know what it is,

  • then that is a really good opportunity

  • to educate them about it.

  • And that way we don’t have to

  • lose the symbol to the Nazis.

  • I can understand why they would want to

  • change it for foreigners who don’t know about

  • Buddhism or Hinduism.

  • Because even if you put a huge sign

  • at every swastika in Japan that says,

  • This is a Buddhist symbol!

  • It’s a sacred symbol that has

  • been around for 2,000 years.

  • It has nothing to do with Nazism, or anything”,

  • youre still not going to teach everyone about it.

  • I mean, you guys probably spell my name incorrectly

  • more often than correctly,

  • and it’s the name of our channel!

  • So, there’s no way to teach everyone something.

  • But still, I don’t think it would hurt to try.

  • And either way, you know, it’s their decision to make,

  • and none of these symbols have actually

  • been finalised yet.

  • These are still just the proposed symbols.

  • So, it will be later this year that they actually

  • make the announcement, which symbol, for sure,

  • they will be adding to maps for foreigners.

  • And, by the way, these are all just symbols

  • that they are changing for maps for foreigners.

  • They are not using these on maps for

  • Japanese people yet.

  • All in all, they have proposed 18 new symbols

  • for foreigners, and they have also looked at

  • things like how they should spell things

  • on maps to make it more easily understable.

  • So, for example, they are trying to figure out

  • the best way to label a shrine.

  • The word forshrinein Japanese isjinja” (神社).

  • So, they have been saying, “Should I call it, like,

  • a ‘jinjaand shrine? Or should I just call it

  • shrine? Should I just call itjinja’?”

  • So, they have really been doing their due diligence

  • on conducting research to figure out, what the absolute

  • best way to label maps for foreigners is.

  • And I give them a hand for that

  • because that’s a lot of work that goes into that.

  • So, I think they have been doing a really great job

  • Despite of how controversial some of these changes

  • are, I understand what they are doing

  • and I appreciate all the work they are putting into it.

  • And I do think it will be helpful for

  • new foreigners, who will be coming into the country,

  • who don’t have a lot of background knowledge

  • about Japan, especially as we get closer

  • to the Olympics.

  • So, anyway

  • Let me know what you guys think about these

  • new symbols, and especially what you think about

  • the swastika because that’s kind of the big one here

  • I’m still kind of hoping that they might leave

  • the original one.

  • But I understand both sides to this, so

  • Anyway, thanks for watching guys,

  • I’ll see you later!

  • Bye!

  • If you have ever been to Kyōto,”

  • you have probably noticed these things

  • up against a lot of the shop walls.”

  • But just what are they?”

  • The most common, widely known usage,”

  • which they are named after,”

  • was traditionally to prevent…”

Hey guys!

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A2 symbol swastika japanese shrine understand jinja

Japan changes tradition for foreigners

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    gotony5614.me97 posted on 2016/07/03
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