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  • [Larry King, host] Alright, let's explore the thinking of Jacque Fresco

  • and the society that he'd like to see.

  • (Jacque Fresco) The reason we emphasize machines and technology

  • is to free man to pursue the higher things.

  • Machines ought to do the filthy, repetitious, or the boring jobs.

  • It would take ten years to change the surface of the Earth.

  • To save our environment, [considering] our stupidity, our conflict,

  • we've got to reorganize our way of thinking and reconsider our social aims.

  • We must put our mind to this as we do to put a man on the moon.

  • [Jeff Hoffman, retired NASA astronaut] Like many kids, when I was 6 years old

  • I dreamed of flying in space. I'm old enough that,

  • back then, the only astronauts were Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers.

  • I went on and became a professional astronomer.

  • I was lucky enough to get selected in the first group of shuttle astronauts.

  • We trained for a long time.

  • Of course, you go through many different types of simulators.

  • But when you're actually sitting up there on the rocket,

  • you realize that "Hey, this is not the simulator!"

  • The whole vehicle is shaking a little bit on the pad.

  • Then, you hear this roar down beneath you.

  • The whole shuttle tilts forward a little bit.

  • Then, as it comes back to the vertical position,

  • all of a sudden, Wham! The solid boosters ignite.

  • There's an incredible vibration and noise.

  • For the next two minutes, there is just so much power

  • that you're sitting on top of.

  • I was just holding on, thinking to myself

  • "Whoa! I hope this whole thing holds together."

  • Sure enough, it did.

  • By that time, we're looking out the window.

  • The blue sky has already turned to the blackness of space.

  • And I can see in the distance the coast of Africa coming up into view.

  • I always remember that feeling on my first flight when I realized:

  • Wow, you're in space!

  • You see from orbit the sunrises and sunsets

  • 16 times every 24 hours.

  • Flying over the Earth at night, in particular

  • gives you a real sense of human civilization.

  • During the day, you look down and you see the colors of the Earth.

  • You see the forms of the landmass, of the continents.

  • There's a lot of beautiful things to see during the day.

  • There's also the view of the impact

  • that humans have had on our planet, and that can be pretty scary.

  • Over the course of 11 years of flying

  • I watched as the Amazon jungle was continually being deforested.

  • [Rondônia, Brazil 2010 24 years of deforestation]

  • At night, you'd constantly see agricultural burning

  • all over the world.

  • You could see harbors being silted up.

  • You could see, in Africa, how the tree line would go up every year.

  • We know about global warming and what we're doing to the atmosphere.

  • That's the other thing you really get a sense of from space

  • is how thin our atmosphere is.

  • Basically, the idea that we're seeing this environmental damage

  • on the Earth, created by humans,

  • but we see it from a cosmic perspective,

  • means that it's just not something that we can ignore.

  • The planet is responding to the presence of humanity.

  • [Carl Sagan, "Pale Blue Dot", 1994] The Earth is a very small stage

  • in a vast cosmic arena.

  • Think of the rivers of blood

  • spilled by all those generals and emperors

  • so that in glory and triumph

  • they can become the momentary masters

  • of a fraction of a dot. [Earth from 3.7 billion miles]

  • Think of the endless cruelties visited

  • by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel

  • on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner.

  • How eager they are to kill one another,

  • how fervent their hatreds.

  • Our posturings,

  • our imagined self-importance,

  • the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe

  • are challenged by this point of pale light.

  • Our planet is a lonely speck

  • in the great enveloping cosmic dark.

  • In all this vastness, there is no hint

  • that help will come from elsewhere

  • to save us

  • from ourselves.

  • The Venus Project presents

  • THE CHOICE IS OURS

  • Documentary film by Roxanne Meadows, Joel Holt Original score by Kat Epple

  • PART I

  • (Narrator) For the first time, we have the capability, the technology,

  • and the knowledge to achieve a global society of abundance for all.

  • We cannot continue as we are

  • or the consequences will surely be dire.

  • A 2012 UN report states that a global population growth

  • from 7 billion to almost 9 billion is expected by 2040.

  • Demands for resources will rise exponentially.

  • By 2030, requirements for food are projected to rise by 50%,

  • energy by 45%,

  • and water by 30%.

  • We are presently depleting natural resources

  • 50% faster than the planet can renew.

  • At this rate, it is estimated that we'll need 3 more planet Earths

  • to keep up with resource needs as they are today.

  • What is the sixth extinction?

  • Is it happening right now? What's the cause of it?

  • What we, as human beings, are doing to the planet

  • is changing the basic conditions of life

  • very dramatically and very rapidly.

  • (Narrator) And yet, from environmental disaster to war,

  • our obsolete value systems perpetuate insanity,

  • threatening us on many fronts.

  • Is it the best we can do to just clean up after the fact?

  • Are politicians capable or even competent to manage the world around us?

  • (Gordon Brown) Let me explain.

  • Order! The prime minister.

  • (Narrator) Are we simply incapable of anticipating

  • and planning for our future?

  • Are we innately flawed in ways we can't change?

  • (Journalist) Why not just use firing squads? - Aim!

  • (Narrator) We often hear that human nature is fixed...

  • It's only human nature!

  • ...and our worst qualities are inborn.

  • - How are they gonna stop being criminals? - Oh, nonsense!

  • They were born that way and there is no use trying to change them.

  • THE DETERMINANTS OF BEHAVIOR

  • [Henry Schlinger Jr., PhD] I think it's difficult to talk about a specific human nature

  • like we talk about fixed or modal action patterns in nonhuman species.

  • But clearly in humans, learning plays the major role.

  • In fact, I refer to humans as 'the learning animal',

  • because humans learn more than any other animal.

  • (Narrator) And yet, considering our history of aggression,

  • warlike tendencies,

  • jealousies and hatred...

  • (US soldier) Keep shootin'

  • (Narrator) ...we still have much to learn.

  • One would think it impossible to simply overlook

  • the conditions we're immersed in.

  • (Jacque) The culture doesn't know any better.

  • They don't know what forces are involved in shaping human behavior.

  • Therefore, they invent their own concept

  • and project their own values into human behavior

  • and say that's human nature.

  • That's where they're wrong.

  • (Henry) Right now we have an explosion of technologies in our culture.

  • I think many people think that technology is going to save us.

  • Certainly technology has made our lives easier in many respects.

  • - Find parking space. - Parking space found.

  • Sometimes it's good; sometimes it's not so good.

  • (Journalist) Drones armed with Hellfire missiles...

  • How would you like to get paid to spy on your neighbors?

  • There's one technology that we don't have, that we sorely need

  • if we're going to really change, and that's the technology of behavior.

  • The science of behavior needs to be applied like the sciences of physics,

  • chemistry, and biology have been.

  • That's that one missing ingredient in our culture.

  • And that's the toughest one because

  • it opposes the way that most people think about themselves.

  • (Narrator) Examining human behavior in the same manner

  • as any other physical phenomenon

  • will enable us to understand the factors responsible for shaping

  • our attitudes and our conduct.

  • (Henry) All natural scientists assume that their subject matters

  • are lawful and orderly. If they're not, then you can't do science.

  • Behavioral scientists assume that human behavior and

  • the behavior of other organisms is also lawful and orderly.

  • To not assume that means that you accept that

  • human behavior is somehow separate from the rest of nature.

  • We don't make that assumption. We make the assumption

  • that human behavior is part of nature.

  • (Narrator) Human behavior is just as lawful as everything else.

  • (Jacque) The sunflower does not turn to the sun.

  • The sun makes it turn

  • by pulling in membranes.

  • A sailboat cannot sail. The wind moves it.

  • Plants can't grow. They are shoved

  • by sunshine, soil, temperature, all kinds of things.

  • All things are shoved by something