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  • The definition of nursing is very very interesting because

  • if you look at a dictionary nursing is to care and to nurture

  • There is actually no connection with the word nursing and what

  • the job does

  • You think of lawyers - yes, you think of doctors - you know,

  • strong professional educated people and then you think of nurses

  • as noble and caring and not understanding theres a significant

  • amount of education needed in order to become a nurse.

  • People that I meet on the street, just in casual conversation, other

  • colleagues, friends, they would always mention - you're a nurse,

  • what hospital do you work in? Not all nurses work in hospitals.

  • and the public doesn't really realize that as well. That nurses

  • don't always work in hospital sectors or acute care.

  • There's community, research, there's governmental levels

  • that we work in, occupational health the list could go on and when they

  • hear that - like myself, I work in administration and they hear

  • that and they're like - oh, you can do that?

  • Why wouldn't I be able to do that?

  • You know, they're like - don't you have to have a business degree?

  • And I'm like - umm, not necessarily but you know

  • it's something that they don't know

  • On our way to work, to school, to the grocery store, our eyes

  • meet hundreds of other eyes on a day to day basis

  • Sometimes we meet the same people over and over again.

  • We don't know what they do or we're they're off to right now

  • We could only judge by their uniform or their appearance

  • stereotypes opposed by time and media. We live in a world of humans with jobs

  • and professions. The importance of or the existence we may not even

  • be aware.

  • What is the role of a nurse?

  • How do we know what nurses do?

  • or what nurses are?

  • What is the role of a nurse in this society?

  • Well she's supposed to be there to take care of the sick people in the hospital.

  • She's like a doctor's assistant It's important.

  • Well I'd say administrating drugs...

  • Bring you food, pills, whatever..

  • The roles of nurses in society is to assist the ill and to assist doctors

  • and they have a lot of responsibilities from what I understand but I don't

  • know too much about it.

  • I'm guessing the nurse helps out in the hospitals. To me, it's a step

  • not under doctor, but they just help out doctors and make things run smoother.

  • No, I couldn't do it. Blood, all that kind of nasty stuff

  • nope - not qualified at all

  • Taking care of sick people - no

  • It's not something I think I'd be good at

  • No because it's really hard, I don't think I could make it

  • No, definitely not, I'm not in nursing, no

  • So who is responsible for the public's passive view?

  • Nurses themselves? The system? The environment they work in?

  • How did the public become so indifferent? Is the media at the root

  • of all this?

  • [music]

  • In regards to the media representation, there have

  • been a lot of negative aspects towards the nursing profession.

  • Recently the dentyne ice commercial that was out in regards to the nurse

  • who entered the patient's bedroom and they close the curtains

  • leaving it up to your imagination to interpret it however you want.

  • There was the virgin mobile one a couple of years back as well.

  • Virgin was trying to sell their cellphones and had the nurse

  • in the very mini skirt with the little cleavage and very buxom.

  • A lot of the sex shops or even the fantasy novels

  • depict nurses as that but it could be, primarily

  • because in some settings like acute care, ICU, long term care

  • A lot of the times nurses have to be kind of intimate

  • in that sense where they have to perform procedures

  • on them where they might be exposed.

  • And its a little but uncomfortable for patients where you're doing things

  • It's probably from that way.

  • However, nurses used to, women used to dress like that

  • about 50 - 40 years ago. There were some nurses out there

  • who went into the professions, just to marry

  • a doctor. Were they a little bit more provocative? Possibly.

  • I mean, I went to school with a number of girls who went into

  • nursing just to find themselves a doctor.

  • When I was going through nursing school, in my undergrad

  • I've often said that when you open the nursing texts, what you

  • see - I'm not sure today, but certainly when I was

  • going through nursing school. The nurse was always a female,

  • The patient was always a male. And to me that was a big problem

  • because A) I didn't have a role model to relate to, even from a

  • picture perspective.

  • I've constantly seen nurses as females and then when you get

  • into your practice settings, certainly there's a lot of stereotypes.

  • The most common one is you have to be homosexual

  • to be a nurse. Whether that is true or not is irrelevant

  • but that is the very common one. The other one is you cannot be

  • as compassionate or empathic as a female, because you're a guy

  • You're not supposed to, you're supposed to be strong

  • you can't be sensitive, so certainly these kind of sterotypes

  • I think, still persist

  • Not often, but many times I've encountered patients not

  • wanting a male nurse whether it be a female, even men, because

  • of these stereotypes. "Well you must be homosexual, as a guy

  • I don't want you to see me naked.

  • So yah, it takes time, people don't know what they don't know

  • unless you experience it and realize the difference.

  • There's very few individuals who just flat out couldn't have

  • a man, whether it be religious issues or cultural, we have to respect it.

  • For most cases, it wouldn't matter but if it was something more

  • of a male injury then yah I would prefer

  • a male nurse, I would imagine.

  • Definitely female, I don't know why...

  • Female, because I'm a male, That's why.

  • I don't think it matters I think they both do the same job

  • have the same education.

  • Female, maybe for me because I'm a female.

  • So maybe easier to understand each other, so something between

  • different pain or worry between men and women

  • They're all professionals and they each have a role.

  • And I think it would be great if there were more males in the profession

  • A female nurse is nice, you know, the stereotypical porno star or whatever

  • but in reality I don't care. If I'm bleeding or something

  • just fix me. Who cares?

  • It doesn't matter. As long as they're qualified

  • and they're good and they've got good bedside manner

  • It doesn't matter

  • Female, I say, Much comfortable, much organized.

  • I think it's all the same. To me, it doesn't matter.

  • As long as I'm getting not sick faster, that's great.

  • It doesn't matter if it's a male or a female, it's

  • just how well you do your job kind of thing

  • and if you do it out of your heart, because jobs

  • like that you have to do from within.

  • I've actually never had a male nurse So I couldn't say that.

  • As of the year 2007, 6% of nurses in Canada are male

  • Quebec has the highest proportion of male nurses.

  • 10%, While Ontario takes second place at 5%.

  • And these numbers are very close to world averages.

  • I think men in nursing provide a different aspect

  • and a different colour and a different diversity

  • and a different approach to care I think it's absolutely important

  • We shouldn't miss that boat and I think that will be beneficial

  • to the patients, to see more than one type of person or

  • individual or category of people providing care.

  • Medicine and nursing are not the same - we work within the

  • same area, within the same milieu, we have the same form

  • of education as far as science background is concerned,

  • as far as anatomy, that is very similar and that is where

  • a lot of the inter-professional education is coming from,

  • from that similar basis.

  • It's always been the case, when I go into a patient's room

  • "Hello Doctor" It's never, you know,

  • No I have to correct them "No, I'm your nurse"

  • Oh why didn't you want to go to medical school...

  • I'm pretty happy with what I'm doing. It opens your mind

  • to a lot of things you never thought before.

  • I think what doesn't help the image of nurses - is nurses

  • who don't take themselves seriously. Who don't take what

  • they do very seriously. And I think a lot of us may not be doing that

  • So often enough, you'll hear nurses say "I'm just a nurse"

  • Don't say that. You're a Nurse. and I've corrected may people with that

  • and that trickles that stays in your head.

  • The image of nursing is unique to the individual

  • We come together as professional. We definitely need the empirical knowledge

  • we need a solid knowledge base from where we have a very solid

  • foundation and from this foundation we build a framework.

  • Wherever you're going within this framework, there's this unique

  • human connection that makes that contact with that one patient

  • that one time, a unique image.

  • You can never accurately stereotype anyone, but as humans, we tend to like

  • to create categories. Lawyer, Electrician, Musician

  • Teacher, Nurse, then fit people into them. So do you want to

  • fit this stereotype of a nurse or help change that stereotype.

  • It's up to you.

The definition of nursing is very very interesting because

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A2 nurse nursing female male care doctor

Images of Nursing:"I'm just a nurse"

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    Kanmuri Bun Wang posted on 2016/05/17
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