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  • Hawa Abdi: Many people -- 20 years for Somalia --

  • [were] fighting.

  • So there was no job, no food.

  • Children, most of them,

  • became very malnourished, like this.

  • Deqo Mohamed: So as you know,

  • always in a civil war,

  • the ones affected most [are] the women and children.

  • So our patients are women and children.

  • And they are in our backyard.

  • It's our home. We welcome them.

  • That's the camp that we have in now

  • 90,000 people,

  • where 75 percent of them are women and children.

  • Pat Mitchell: And this is your hospital. This is the inside.

  • HA: We are doing C-sections and different operations

  • because people need some help.

  • There is no government to protect them.

  • DM: Every morning we have about 400 patients,

  • maybe more or less.

  • But sometimes we are only five doctors

  • and 16 nurses,

  • and we are physically getting exhausted to see all of them.

  • But we take the severe ones,

  • and we reschedule the other ones the next day.

  • It is very tough.

  • And as you can see, it's the women who are carrying the children;

  • it's the women who come into the hospitals;

  • it's the women [are] building the houses.

  • That's their house.

  • And we have a school. This is our bright --

  • we opened [in the] last two years [an] elementary school

  • where we have 850 children,

  • and the majority are women and girls.

  • (Applause)

  • PM: And the doctors have some very big rules

  • about who can get treated at the clinic.

  • Would you explain the rules for admission?

  • HA: The people who are coming to us,

  • we are welcoming.

  • We are sharing with them

  • whatever we have.

  • But there are only two rules.

  • First rule:

  • there is no clan distinguished and political division

  • in Somali society.

  • [Whomever] makes those things we throw out.

  • The second:

  • no man can beat his wife.

  • If he beat,

  • we will put [him] in jail,

  • and we will call the eldest people.

  • Until they identify this case,

  • we'll never release him.

  • That's our two rules.

  • (Applause)

  • The other thing that I have realized,

  • that the woman is the most strong person

  • all over the world.

  • Because the last 20 years,

  • the Somali woman has stood up.

  • They were the leaders,

  • and we are the leaders

  • of our community

  • and the hope of our future generations.

  • We are not just the helpless

  • and the victims of the civil war.

  • We can reconcile.

  • We can do everything.

  • (Applause)

  • DM: As my mother said, we are the future hope,

  • and the men are only killing in Somalia.

  • So we came up with these two rules.

  • In a camp with 90,000 people,

  • you have to come up with some rules or there is going to be some fights.

  • So there is no clan division,

  • and no man can beat his wife.

  • And we have a little storage room

  • where we converted a jail.

  • So if you beat your wife, you're going to be there.

  • (Applause)

  • So empowering the women and giving the opportunity --

  • we are there for them. They are not alone for this.

  • PM: You're running a medical clinic.

  • It brought much, much needed medical care

  • to people who wouldn't get it.

  • You're also running a civil society.

  • You've created your own rules,

  • in which women and children

  • are getting a different sense of security.

  • Talk to me about your decision, Dr. Abdi,

  • and your decision, Dr. Mohamed,

  • to work together --

  • for you to become a doctor

  • and to work with your mother in these circumstances.

  • HA: My age --

  • because I was born in 1947 --

  • we were having, at that time,

  • government, law and order.

  • But one day, I went to the hospital --

  • my mother was sick --

  • and I saw the hospital, how they [were] treating the doctors,

  • how they [are] committed

  • to help the sick people.

  • I admired them,

  • and I decided to become a doctor.

  • My mother died, unfortunately,

  • when I was 12 years [old].

  • Then my father allowed me

  • to proceed [with] my hope.

  • My mother died

  • in [a] gynecology complication,

  • so I decided to become

  • a gynecology specialist.

  • That's why I became a doctor.

  • So Dr. Deqo has to explain.

  • DM: For me, my mother was preparing [me] when I was a child

  • to become a doctor, but I really didn't want to.

  • Maybe I should become an historian,

  • or maybe a reporter.

  • I loved it, but it didn't work.

  • When the war broke out -- civil war --

  • I saw how my mother was helping

  • and how she really needed the help,

  • and how the care is essential to the woman

  • to be a woman doctor in Somalia

  • and help the women and children.

  • And I thought, maybe I can be a reporter and doctor gynecologist.

  • (Laughter)

  • So I went to Russia, and my mother also,

  • [during the] time of [the] Soviet Union.

  • So some of our character,

  • maybe we will come with a strong Soviet background of training.

  • So that's how I decided [to do] the same.

  • My sister was different.

  • She's here. She's also a doctor.

  • She graduated in Russia also.

  • (Applause)

  • And to go back and to work with our mother

  • is just what we saw in the civil war --

  • when I was 16, and my sister was 11,

  • when the civil war broke out.

  • So it was the need and the people we saw

  • in the early '90s --

  • that's what made us go back

  • and work for them.

  • PM: So what is the biggest challenge

  • working, mother and daughter,

  • in such dangerous

  • and sometimes scary situations?

  • HA: Yes, I was working in a tough situation,

  • very dangerous.

  • And when I saw the people who needed me,

  • I was staying with them to help,

  • because I [could] do something for them.

  • Most people fled abroad.

  • But I remained with those people,

  • and I was trying to do something --

  • [any] little thing I [could] do.

  • I succeeded in my place.

  • Now my place is 90,000 people

  • who are respecting each other,

  • who are not fighting.

  • But we try to stand on our feet,

  • to do something, little things, we can for our people.

  • And I'm thankful for my daughters.

  • When they come to me,

  • they help me to treat the people,

  • to help.

  • They do everything for them.

  • They have done what I desire to do for them.

  • PM: What's the best part

  • of working with your mother,

  • and the most challenging part for you?

  • DM: She's very tough; it's most challenging.

  • She always expects us to do more.

  • And really when you think [you] cannot do it,

  • she will push you, and I can do it.

  • That's the best part.

  • She shows us, trains us how to do

  • and how to be better [people]

  • and how to do long hours in surgery --

  • 300 patients per day,

  • 10, 20 surgeries,

  • and still you have to manage the camp --

  • that's how she trains us.

  • It is not like beautiful offices here,

  • 20 patients, you're tired.

  • You see 300 patients, 20 surgeries

  • and 90,000 people to manage.

  • PM: But you do it for good reasons.

  • (Applause)

  • Wait. Wait.

  • HA: Thank you.

  • DM: Thank you.

  • (Applause)

  • HA: Thank you very much. DM: Thank you very much.

Hawa Abdi: Many people -- 20 years for Somalia --

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A2 TED mother doctor people pm civil

【TED】Hawa Abdi + Deqo Mohamed: Mother and daughter doctor-heroes (Mother and daughter doctor-heroes: Hawa Abdi + Deqo Mohamed)

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    Max Lin posted on 2016/05/10
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