B1 Intermediate US 10725 Folder Collection
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Hey, there, welcome to Life Noggin!
If you've never had a nosebleed before, the first one can be terrifying.
Especially if you're young when it happens and have no idea what's going on.
All you know is that blood is leaking out of your face... for no reason.
But of course, now that you are older, you know that there is a reason your nose started to bleed.
You were experiencing a condition known as epistaxis.
When this occurs, it can be one of two types: anterior or posterior.
More than likely, you'll get an anterior nosebleed, which is caused by irritation to blood vessels in the nasal septum.
That's the part of your nose that separates your two nostrils.
And it's also the part of your nose that can get deviated, which can lead to difficulty breathing.
And fun fact: It's estimated that 80% of people have some type of misalignment to their nasal septum.
If I had a nose, I could attest to that, but sadly, my face is pretty featureless, as you can see.
But a block can dream!
Anyway, in the nasal septum is an area called the Kiesselbach plexus, where four different arteries come together to form a network of blood vessels.
So, when this area is irritated by either a vigorous blow or a roaming finger, some of the blood vessels may break.
And then you get blood running down your face and possibly the back of your throat.
But what about dry air?
In the northern hemisphere, winter is coming, and with it comes a lot of nosebleeds.
The decreased humidity and temperature prevent your nose from getting the moisture it needs.
This then makes the mucous membrane more susceptible to bleeding.
And... voila! You get blood leaking down your nostril.
The only thing more unappealing than that is saying the words "mucous membrane".
So, how do you stop the blood?
Well, it's recommended that you pinch the soft part of your nose for ten minutes, making sure to keep the nostrils closed.
This pressure helps the blood to clot and stops the bleeding.
Oh, and make sure you lean forward during this because, otherwise, as I previously mentioned, blood can leak down the back of your throat, which you don't want.
However, if you are lucky enough to be near a doctor when you get a nosebleed, if they can easily see the broken blood vessel, they may be able to cauterize, or seal it, using silver nitrate.
So now your nose... I'm sorry. I could've just ended this.
So, do yourself a favor and keep all fingers and foreign objects away from your nostrils.
Your nose and future self will thank you.
Have you ever had a nosebleed? Do you get them often?
If you're comfortable with sharing, let us know in the comment section below, or tell us what we should talk about next.
And if you want even more Life Noggin, check out this video we did on what would happen if all cats suddenly died. Yeah.
Yeah! Oh, and make sure you follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
As always, my name is Blocko, this has been Life Noggin, don't forget to keep on thinking.
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What Causes Nosebleeds?

10725 Folder Collection
Jacky Avocado Tao published on February 1, 2016    張景惠 translated    Mandy Lin reviewed
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