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  • Hey my name is Freddy Wong, I´m here with the Creator Academy,

  • here to talk to you about alternate frame rates,

  • specifically frame rates up to 60 frames a second.

  • As Freddy is running, you´ll see his hands are moving and they are blurry,

  • at 24 Frames per second.

  • The jump rope is moving very crisp and clear, at 60 frames per second.

  • Why would you use something, up to 60 frames per second? Well...

  • ..the same reason why you would use different aspect ratios,

  • different color correction.

  • Or maybe shooting it in black and white.

  • It´s all changing the form of what you´re doing,

  • And by changing the form, you´re hopefully

  • also affecting the way your content is received.

  • 60 frames per second has a very specific look,

  • because you have, well, 60 frames per second.

  • It´s a little bit smoother, wait, is this in 60?

  • Is this in 60?

  • Because look at that!

  • Normally something like this, in 24 frames per second,

  • would be sort of smeary, motion blurry, what have you,

  • but here, haha,

  • every moment, every weird hand movement I´m making right now

  • is captured in excruciating detail.

  • 60 frames a second is great,

  • for getting the sort of motion you get in fast scenes, in fight scenes,

  • car chases, anything that has very fast motion.

  • You probably won´t notice, 60 frames a second,

  • in something like say a big, long, steady landscape shot.

  • But it has an effect in the way motion is seen,

  • elsewhere.

  • Video Game High school is actually a show, where we used a split frame rate,

  • where all the stuff happening in the real world, we shot at 24 frames per second,

  • and everything that´s happening inside the video game, we shot at 48 frames per second.

  • So the idea was, with 48 you had more

  • of a video game-y smooth look.

  • This was a really easy way to distinguish the difference between

  • what the video game world was and the real world.

  • Normally when people have done this, with things like color correction,

  • aspect ratio, for The Matrix for example, right?

  • Everything in the real world of that movie is blue,

  • and everything inside the matrix is green tinted.

  • We didn´t want to do something so drastic, like with color correction,

  • so we decided to evoke that difference visually

  • by changing up the frame rate.

  • There´s like a new generation of viewers,

  • viewers who are sort of more used to things at a higher fame rate,

  • things like video games, which might play at 60 frames a second.

  • And you get a lot of benefits.

  • Like take for example, the sort of shot of a car wheel, spinning.

  • At 24 frames a second in a lot of movies,

  • the car wheel starts to spin but then it looks like it´s starting to spin backwards.

  • It´s kind of a weird effect.

  • A helicopter blade, anything that´s sort of fast and spinning.

  • At 60 frames a second at higher frame rates gets you around that,

  • by getting the direction right.

  • 24 frames a second is great but it also has these weird motion artifacts,

  • that we´ve now, at this day and age, have come to accept,

  • because that´s the way movies always have been,

  • but that doesn´t mean that´s how movies always have to be.

  • And the question really, at the end of the day, comes to:

  • If you like that look and if that look serves the story that you are trying to tell.

  • If there´s action, and even if you don´t end up liking the look

  • of 60 frames per second,

  • I always recommend shooting at a higher frame rate,

  • or even double your frame rate,

  • just because if you ever wanna do a slow motion effect,

  • you can always just have that there,

  • and have that...ehm...ehm...ability to go into slow mo.

  • I like using higher frame rates for things that are action oriented,

  • or are very quick moving,

  • you know, i think that the look of it is a very realistic look.

  • You know, I think it starts to fool your eye

  • into looking at what you´re seeing as something

  • that´s sort of no longer through the lens of like cinema,

  • but more sort of a real life, look at something.

  • And what I found is, that a lot of times it helps,

  • unless you´re doing like a more realistic Vlog, or something

  • that is a little more documentary style.

  • It puts you in there a lot more,

  • as a viewer, than compared to something like 24 frames a second,

  • where you´re like, oh this is clearly a movie.

  • So what´s cool about YouTube enabling 60 frames a second is,

  • again, it opens up more of a palate,

  • in terms of what you as a creator can do.

  • You know, for capturing game footage, if you're doing game commentary,

  • or any sort of video game stuff.

  • It allows you to capture things at a very smooth frame rate,

  • and really play back at exactly what you´re seeing.

  • If you´re doing live action stuff, you´re working with cameras,

  • you´re working with....ehm...ehm..shooting things,

  • then it allows you to have another option,

  • in your big palate of tools,

  • in terms of how you want to express your story,

  • your image, and what you wanna get across in your videos.

  • This has been Freddy Wong, if you´re interested in YouTube Videos,

  • you should check out my YouTube Channel,

  • it´s YouTube.com/rocketjump.

  • If you´re interested in more tutorials and how to´s and explanations

  • check out the Creator Academy.

  • No links right here.

Hey my name is Freddy Wong, I´m here with the Creator Academy,

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  • 159 9
    CindyHu posted on 2015/12/19
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