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  • Hi everybody! Martina here!

  • And I’m here with my friend Rachel today

  • Hi! From Rachel and Jun

  • So as you guys know weve been living in Korea for about seven years now

  • And Rachel’s been living in Japan for about a year but

  • youve been going back and forth there for, what, like

  • Five years. Five years or so, so

  • when we go to Japan to visit her, we experience a lot of cultural differences

  • and when Rachel comes to Korea she’s like, whoa, what’s happening here?

  • so today were going to talk about

  • some of the cultural differences when visiting each other’s countries

  • -Voice Pitch-

  • There’s a lot of really high pitched voices in Japan

  • So when you got to Starbucks and they say, like

  • good morning to us is not like OHIO GOZAYMAS

  • It’s like HI! OHIO GOZAYMAS!

  • Really high and cute, and I’m like WHOA!

  • How are you doing that. In Korea there isn’t really any voice change

  • We have, like Aegyo, when youre trying to be cute

  • and youre likeOPPA! WAYGOORAY!”

  • But it’s mostly like, kind of a flirty thing, right.

  • It’s not flirty in Japan right?

  • No, no. I do know some people who genuinely have high pitched voices

  • but Japanese as a language is spoken higher in your throat,

  • so it’s more natural to come out very high pitched,

  • I do it automatically, like, so many of my female friends do it

  • without realizing when they speak Japanese

  • Yeah, I’ve recorded some things in Japanese sometimes on my channel,

  • and I’ve looked through it later like WHAT?!?! WHAT?!?!?

  • WHAT AM I DOING?!?!?!?

  • And I have to force myself to speak very low

  • No, you know what? That makes sense!

  • Because I’ll notice that rather saying to someone like

  • ARIGATO, I’ll be like

  • HAI! ARIGATO GOZAYMAS! I’m already changing my pitch

  • It feels like that what you should do, right? So

  • But it’s still pretty shocking to me because

  • I really feel like I’m watching a cartoon.

  • -Music Law-

  • I will tell you something else that really stood out to me in Korea

  • The streets that I’ve walked down,

  • All of the streets have the doors open

  • And theyre just, like, blaring Kpop music out onto the streets

  • You can hear it everywhere

  • You want to hear something funny?

  • When we first arrived in Korea, umm, every single shop,

  • like, not even a clothing store, like every single store

  • would blast music so obnoxiously,

  • so you couldn’t sleep at nighttime, uh huh

  • and eventually they had to put a ban on noise pollution

  • REALLY?! OMG!

  • And so when we were in Hongdae that sound of music

  • Is, like, way quieter than it used to me.

  • Oh my god!

  • So I’m like, “I can hear myself speaking now!”

  • But it’s still really, really loud.

  • But I’ve noticed in Japan there’s, like, 8bit midi music being, like,

  • I go grocery shopping and it sounds like an elevator, like, elevator music,

  • like, it’s like

  • It’s the weirdest thing

  • My first year I was in Japan I was like

  • Wow! This is so unique, but now actually,

  • I want to hear real music. I’m tired of the,

  • it sounds like the 80s cellphone ringtones

  • Yeah…80s! WHOA! 90s cellphone ringtones.

  • Maybe, 80s?! Theyre like 80s called and said it didn’t have a cellphone yet!

  • So, every time I’m out now it’s so noticeable,

  • and every five minutes I’m like, I know this song!

  • What song is this?

  • And then I have to pause for 30 seconds until I can remember

  • figure out the song

  • Jun! Jun! Who is this!

  • And he’s like Oh, this is AKB48

  • And I’m like OH RIGHT!!!!

  • So, then, you don’t mind the noisiness in Korea

  • like for the restaurants and stuff

  • Yeah, yeah, I…it’s loud and everywhere, but I like having words

  • and like real instruments. And. Gotcha. Yeah.

  • -City Sounds-

  • I’ll tell you a culture shock I didn’t expect to have, yes,

  • Korea is a very loud place, and it is very 24/7

  • Seoul is a city that never sleeps, uh huh,

  • I’ve gotten so used to hearing noise all the time and constantly,

  • that when Simon and I come to Japan and were walking down the street

  • It’s like maybe 8PM, on a Thursday, were going grocery shopping,

  • It is so pin drop quiet,

  • and I actually got anxious

  • SOMETHING’S GONNA HAPPEN! THERE’S A ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE!

  • I could hear the ringing in my ears

  • People are just, like, really respectful of noises here

  • and you don’t want to be super loud and inconvenience other people

  • Like, this is a problem that I still have,

  • without realizing it, I’ll talk very loudly,

  • especially in America, my family talks REALLY LOUDLY

  • WERE SHOUTING AT EACH OTHER ALL THE TIME,

  • So, like, even now, after five years,

  • sometimes well be in public and Jun’s like SHHHHHH!!!

  • and I’m like “I didn’t even notice!”

  • Oh, weve been shushed on the subway and busses,

  • like, I think weve gotten better since being in Korea for seven years,

  • but, like, when we first came, 100% we got shushed.

  • SSSHHHH! And Simon and I are like

  • I didn’t even notice! I know!

  • Foreign struggles

  • -Color-

  • So one thing I’ve noticed when I’ve been to Korea

  • The temples that I’ve seen in Korea

  • are very brightly coloured, like super bright paint

  • Like that aqua, right! But generally a lot of the temples and shrines

  • that I’ve seen here in Japan are just kind of like

  • their natural wood colour. Ohh!

  • Very nature-ey, and like,

  • it feels more like, you know, it’s set into nature

  • it feels a little more mystical to me.

  • I’m not really into colourful things, so

  • I’m not really into the neon coloured temples of Korea

  • For the first time here in Japan, just yesterday,

  • visiting Kyoto, so the temples there were a very bright red

  • but there was a little bit of green lining to it

  • -TAXI-

  • Korean taxis are super affordable,

  • it’s very expensive in Japan

  • and it looks that way, so when you approach a taxi driver

  • they have suits on, and some of them have little white gloves,

  • Yeah, yeah. THE DOORS OPEN LIKE MAGIC!!!

  • Don’t touch the doors.

  • You don’t touch the doors, guys!

  • I’m talking, the door just swings open like magic!

  • And Simon and I can’t break that habit,

  • because in Korea you have to open the door to get in

  • like other parts of the world I guess!

  • Here it’s like, you go to touch it, and you see them inside being like

  • and then the door just swings open and youre like

  • What!

  • And you get in, and it closes automatically!

  • However, what I will say is, Rachel, yes.

  • I have a concern. Yes.

  • All your Taxi Drivers are dying!

  • Theyre like, 90.

  • Theyre adorable! Theyre so cute looking,

  • and theyre very polite, quiet,

  • but they look like theyre dying, like

  • we had a guy that we handed the phone to,

  • and he pulled out an actual magnifying glass,

  • and then switched on a light on the bottom

  • that could shine on our phone.

  • Are you sure you should be driving?

  • And then another guy tried to help us with our luggage,

  • And then Simon’s like NO PLZ NO

  • And the guy is like HHHHHRRRRRGGGGG

  • But I never feel like I’m in danger in a Japanese taxi,

  • and I never feel like I’m going to throw up.

  • Have you taken taxis in Korea? Yeah! Yeah.

  • I’ve taken taxis, and one of my friends in Korea

  • has told me something that seems to be true

  • You have taxis in Korea, where the taxi driver’s really nice and talkative

  • and they just talk to you the whole time

  • and then you have taxi drivers in Korea

  • who are really angry that theyre driving you somewhere

  • I mouthed the word, I didn’t even…I literally mouthed the wordangry”?

  • Cuz I was gonna say

  • There like, they seem inconvenienced

  • that youre paying them to drive you somewhere

  • and they drive liketheyre gonna crash.

  • I was really afraid that I was gonna throw up,

  • and he was angry at us, because he stopped a block earlier

  • than what we asked him to, and we were like,

  • can you justwere the next block

  • and he’s like just…I’ll just stop here

  • And were likeyou can drive us more

  • And he’s like no, this is good.

  • I was like, why, why is it a problem to drive us?

  • Were gonna pay you more! Youll get more money!

  • This is such a common problem. That’s why I can’t say