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  • Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English. Today we are doing a lesson about the difference between "bring" and "take." So let's start.

  • So, here we are and this is David

  • and he is carrying some boxes from the office to a lorry. Okay? So David is here on the right, coming out of the office and he his carrying the boxes to the lorry.

  • And at the office, he meets his manager and the manager says "What are you doing?"

  • And David replies "I am taking these boxes to the lorry." Okay?

  • Now, the same situation, David is taking... (sorry....) David is carrying the boxes to the lorry but now he has arrived at the lorry. Okay?

  • He is in front of the lorry and again, he meets his manager and the manager says "What are you doing?"

  • And this time David replies: "I am bringing these boxes to the lorry."

  • So this time he says "bringing" and at the top, he said "taking". Okay?

  • So why is there a difference? That is the reason for this lesson. We are going to discuss when we use "take" and when we use "bring".

  • So at the top, we use "take" here because the speaker and the listener, they are not at the destination. Ok?

  • So the destination is here. It is the lorry.

  • But the speaker, David, and the listener, the manager, they are at the office. So they are far from the destination.

  • And we can also notice that the direction of the movement is away from the speaker.

  • So we can see the direction of the movement. It starts here and it moves away from the speaker. Ok? That is very important.

  • And at the bottom, since David... he has arrived at the lorry and that is where he meets his manager.

  • So we can notice that the speaker is at the destination. Alright? That is the big difference.

  • And this time, the direction of the movement is to the speaker. Or towards the speaker. Towards David.

  • So this time, the direction is to David and that is the second important difference. Ok?

  • So that is the basic difference between these two words and now we will look at it in more detail.

  • So first of all "take", the verb "take".

  • Well the past simple is "took" and the past participle is "taken". So it is an irregular verb.

  • Now let us look at the form. So here is the example sentence: "I am taking these boxes to the lorry."

  • So the structure is:

  • The verb "take", then the object, then the word "to" and then the indirect object (or the place). And we can see that here.

  • Or sometimes...sometimes we just have the verb "take" followed by the object.

  • So sometimes it is not necessary to specify the place or destination. For example, here: "I will take an umbrella."

  • We say I will take an umbrella if it is obvious where the destination is. If the destination is obvious or not important then we just say "take" and then the object.

  • Now the verb "bring."

  • Again, this is an irregular verb and the past simple and the past participle is "brought". So we pronounce this /brɔt/ (phonetic spelling)

  • And the verb "bring" has three different structures (or forms). This is the first one:

  • So the example sentence is "I am bringing these boxes to the lorry."

  • So the verb "bring", then the object, then the word "to" and then the indirect object.

  • Or we can say, for example "I will bring you an umbrella."

  • And here, we have the verb "bring" and then the indirect object and then the object.

  • So the order is different. The indirect object is before the object and we do not have the word "to".

  • And the third type of structure is the most simple one. And again, here, we can just have the verb "bring" and then the object.

  • So if we do not need to specify the place or the destination, we can just say "I will bring an umbrella", for example.

  • Okay, now let's look in more detail at ... when we use "bring" and when we use "take". Ok?

  • Now it is quite complicated. There are quite a few rules and exceptions. So I made this diagram for you to simplify it for you.

  • So this diagram shows you most of the situations. Not all of them, but the most common situations are shown on this diagram.

  • And there are in fact three situations on this diagram where we use "bring":

  • So this one. That is one, two and three. And the fourth situation is when we use the word "take"

  • So the best way for me to explain this is for me to show you each type of example. Each situation.

  • So I will show you three situations for "bring"

  • and in fact I will also show you three situations for "take". So I'll ... show you three examples for this situation here.

  • So I'm going to start with this one. This situation, number one. Okay?

  • So situation one is: "Sarah would like some sugar."

  • So here is Sarah. She is in a cafe, at a table and she would like some sugar.

  • So she says "Waiter, please bring me some sugar."

  • Okay? So why do we use "bring"? Well let's look at our diagram.

  • The diagram says (we start here, at the top) "Is the speaker at the destination now?"

  • Well Sarah is the speaker and the destination is in fact Sarah. Or the table, where Sarah is. So...because she wants the sugar at the table.

  • So the answer here is "yes" - The speaker is at the destination now.

  • So we answer "yes" here and so we use the word "bring". Very simple. Ok?

  • So this is very easy. If the person (or the speaker) is at the destination of the object, then we always use the word "bring"

  • And so the word "take" is wrong in this context.

  • And this arrow...this shows the direction of the movement. So the movement is going towards the speaker.

  • So now let us look at situation number two. This one.

  • Mark needs an umbrella

  • So here is Mark and here is David.

  • Mark says "I am in the park. It is raining and I'm getting wet!"

  • Now David is at David's house and he answers the phone and he says "Okay, I will bring you an umbrella."

  • "I will bring you an umbrella." Okay?

  • So why does David say "bring"?

  • Well let us look at the diagram: "Is the speaker at the destination now?"

  • This is the speaker and the answer is no. The destination is the park but David is at his house. So here we reply "no".

  • So now we ask this question: "Is the listener at the destination now?"

  • The listener is Mark and yes, he is at the park. So here we answer "yes".

  • And that is why we use the word "bring". That is the second rule. The second situation.

  • So "take" is wrong in this context. And the direction of the movement in is towards Mark.

  • It will be in the future when David arrives at the park. The direction of the movement is to Mark.

  • Now let's look at situation three.

  • Sarah and David organise a meal in a restaurant for tomorrow.

  • Here is Sarah and here is David.

  • And David asks Sarah "Would you like to go for a meal tomorrow to celebrate my birthday?"

  • Sarah replies "Yes, thank you. I will bring your present to the restaurant."

  • So why does Sarah say "bring"? Well, "Is the speaker at the destination now?"

  • Well no. Sarah is the speaker and she is at her home.

  • So we say "no" and we ask this question: "Is the listener at the destination now?" So is David at the destination?

  • Well the destination is the restaurant but David is at his home. So the answer is "no".

  • So we come down here and this question is "Will the speaker and listener be present at the destination?"

  • So will they both be at the restaurant? Well the answer is yes. Yes they will. That is where they are going.

  • And so the answer is "yes" and we use the word "bring". Okay?

  • And so "take" in this context is wrong.

  • If the answer here was "no", so in other words, if David was NOT going to the restaurant, then Sarah would have said "take".

  • Okay? So that is why this is important.

  • And the direction is towards... towards the listener in fact. It is towards David in the future.

  • Now let us look at situation four.

  • "David wants to go to the airport."

  • So this is David and he's asking a taxi driver: "Take me to the airport please!"

  • So is the speaker at the destination now? - No, David is in the street.

  • Is the listener at the destination now? Well the destination is the airport. And the answer is "no" - The listener is in a taxi.

  • So, "Will the listener... will the speaker and listener be present at the destination?"

  • Well what this question means is:- Will the speaker and listener be present at the destination and will they spend time together at the destination?

  • Well the answer is no. It is only David who is really going to the airport. It is only David who will spend time at the airport.

  • The taxi is only going to transport him to the airport. So the answer here is "no".

  • And that is why we come here and we use the word "take"- "take me to the airport". Ok? "Bring" is wrong in this context.

  • And this time, the arrow is in the other direction. The movement is away from David. That is important.

  • Now let us look at situation five:

  • "The dog needs a walk."

  • So there is a boy, John, who says to his dad "Dad, I am going to take the dog to the park."

  • Ok? So John and his dad are in the house and the dog wants to go to the park.

  • Is the speaker at the destination now?

  • No, the destination is the park but John is in the house - "no"

  • Is the listener at the destination? No, dad is also in the house.

  • Will the speaker and listener be present at the destination? Will they spend time at the destination?

  • Well no, it is only John who is going to the park. Dad is staying at the house.

  • So the answer is "no" and we use the word "take".

  • And "bring", in this context, is wrong.

  • And the direction is away from the house. Okay? It is away from the house.

  • Now the last situation. Situation six.

  • An invoice must go to a different department.

  • Ok? So this is Jane.

  • Jane works in the sales department and she is talking to John.

  • Jane says "Please take this invoice to the accounts department." Ok?

  • So is the speaker at the destination?

  • Well no, the destination is the accounts department but Jane is in the sales department.

  • Is the listener at the destination? No, he is also in the sales department.

  • And will the speaker and the listener be present at the destination? Will they spend time at the destination?

  • No, because Jane is staying here.

  • It is only the man who's going to the accounts department. So the answer here is "no" and so we use the word "take".

  • And "bring", in this context, is wrong.

  • And the direction is from the sales department to the accounts department. It is away from the speaker.

  • Okay, so those are the six situations, sorry the four situations,

  • And the context and perspective are very important when we are deciding whether to use "bring" or "take".

  • Sometimes, grammatically...sometimes we only know which one is correct if we know the context.

  • So sometimes both are correct but only correct with one context. Let me give you another example:

  • Mark has some photographs at home

  • and he would like to show those photographs to his manager at work tomorrow.

  • First of all, Mark is discussing the photographs at home with his wife.

  • So here is Mark. He is at home with his wife and he is discussing the photographs.

  • So he says to his wife "I will take the photographs to the office tomorrow."

  • Ok? So that.. if you look at the diagram, that is following all the rules of the diagram and that is why we say "take".

  • But then, if he calls his manager to discuss it with his manager,

  • then he will say to his manager "I will bring the photographs to the office tomorrow." Okay?

  • ..because Mark is not at the destination (yet), his manager is not at the destination yet but they will both be at the destination tomorrow.

  • They will both spend time at the destination tomorrow. So that is why, in this context, he says "bring".

  • So he says "bring" when talking to his manager, but he says "take" when he is talking to his wife.

  • Okay? Because his wife will not be present at the destination. So context is very very important.

  • Exercise

  • So three questions. For each question, which of the two sentences is correct?

  • Question one: Sarah says "Thanks for bringing me here."

  • or "Thanks for taking my here."

  • Which one is correct? And I will give you five seconds...

  • Well the answer is the first one. Sarah is the speaker and she is at the destination. So she says "bringing".

  • Question two: David says "I'll bring you home after this drink."

  • or "I'll take you home after this drink." Which one is correct?

  • Well the answer is "I'll take you home after this drink."

  • Okay? And if you're not sure why, then go back and look at the example with the taxi. Ok? It's the same example as the taxi.

  • Question three: David says "Barman, please bring me the bill."

  • or "Barman, please take me the bill." Which one is correct?

  • And the answer is the first one: "bring" is correct because David is at the destination.

  • David is the speaker and he is at the destination because he wants the bill.

  • So we use the word "bring". Ok?

  • So that is the end of the lesson.

  • Here are two other videos which you might be interested in. This is a listening exercise and this is a grammar lesson.

  • Okay, thank you very much for watching. My name is Andrew at Crown Academy of English and I will see you next time. Bye bye!

Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English. Today we are doing a lesson about the difference between "bring" and "take." So let's start.

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A2 destination david speaker listener lorry sarah

The difference between bring and take | English grammar

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    楊鎧瑄 posted on 2015/10/10
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