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  • >> TIM REBER: Hello everyone. My name is Tim Reber with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory,

  • and I'd like to welcome you to today's webinar, which is hosted by the Clean Energy Solutions

  • Center in partnership with the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century, or REN21.

  • Today's webinar is focused on the Renewables 2015 Global Status Report and its findings

  • that they relate to distributed renewable energy. One important note is mentioned before

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  • Today's webinar agenda is centered around the presentations from our two guest panelists,

  • Rana Adib and Fabiani Appavou. These panelists have been kind enough to join us to provide

  • an overview of REN21's newly released Renewables 2015 Global Status Report and a look at the

  • status of distributed energy. Before our speakers begin their presentations, I will provide

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  • And now I'd like to go ahead and provide brief introductions for today's panelists. First

  • up today is Rana Adib. Rana is the research coordinator at REN21 and has assisted with

  • the annual production of the REN21 Renewables Global Status Report. Today, Rana will provide

  • an overview of the key findings from the status report. Following Rana, we'll hear from Fabiani

  • Appavou. Fabiani is a consultant at REN21 working on the development of a distributed

  • renewable energy data collection, namely in developing countries. He also supports the

  • work and research of REN21 in developing renewable energy and energy efficiency regional status

  • report for Africa.

  • Fabiani will be providing an overview of Renewables Global Status Reports' finding as they specifically

  • relate to distributed energy. And now with those introductions, I'd like to go ahead

  • and welcome our first speaker, Rana, to the webinar. Rana, whenever you're ready.

  • >> RANA ADIB: Hello everybody. I hope that you can see my screen and also hear my voice.

  • I'm very happy to have the opportunity to present the Renewables Global Status Report

  • with a particular focus on distributed renewable energy for energy access in developing countries

  • just because that's really a field which is rising a lot, but is also causing specific

  • challenges in the work we are conducting. So very quickly on REN21, REN21 is a multi-stakeholder

  • network dedicated to the rapid uptake of renewable energy worldwide. It's a network where we're,

  • different stakeholder groups are working together. It's NGOs and all society industry associations,

  • national governments, international organization, and science and academia.

  • I underlined the fact that it's multi-stakeholder network and also this network character because

  • all our activities are really done in a very collaborative approach. REN21 produces every

  • year the Renewables Global Status Report. The report, the 2015 edition was launched

  • in June at the Vienna Energy Firm and was the tenth edition. Again here, the way the

  • report is produced is really reflecting very much the structure of REN21 because it's a

  • joint effort of approximately 500 contributors, researchers, reviewers worldwide. We have

  • different features here focusing on a general overview about renewable energy and power

  • heating and cooling and transferred.

  • Then there is a section on market and industry trends on the specific renewable energy technologies,

  • on investment flow. This is a work undertaking in collaboration with UNEP Frankfurt School

  • and Bloomberg Energy Finance. So we are basically presenting a summary here. Obviously, a section

  • on policy landscape, and we have a specific faction on distributed renewable energy for

  • our energy access. Just because we think it's an area which is not that well known, there

  • is more and more information on energy access, but not the specific role of renewable energy

  • for in this field. And so that's the reason why we have a specific section for that. The

  • GSR 2015 for the first time featured a section on energy efficiency just to really underline

  • the need to think renewable energy and energy efficiency jointly. There is no way to reach

  • basically a sustainable energy for all goals on renewable energy shares without including

  • the demand side.

  • Every year, there is a changing feature. This year, it was on using renewables for climate

  • change adaptation in view of the COP in Paris. Next year, there will be a feature on community

  • energy. The report covers all renewable energy technologies, power heating and cooling and

  • transfer sector, and energy efficiency. We don't do any forecasts. There is no real analysis.

  • It's really about the status of renewable energy. Now let me take you through some,

  • before taking you through some numbers, I would also like to mention the fact that we

  • are, since a couple of years producing original renewable energy and energy efficiency status

  • reports because the field is getting so large that we really see that there is a need for

  • regional efforts on data collection on having regional strategies.

  • Last year, we launched November report on the ECOWAS region, and there is a couple of

  • upcoming reports, one on [inaudible] South African Development Community, one on UNECE,

  • and in early probably first quarter of 2016 on the East African Community. The data collected

  • in this GSR effort and in the regional reports are also presented on a web portal, which

  • allows for, facilitates basically the access to the information at the country level. Now

  • let me take you through some numbers. Generally, what we can say if we look at the decade of

  • renewables, the last decade on renewable evolution, renewables really surpassed all expectations.

  • There is a global and sole capacity production from all renewable technologies have increased

  • substantially, and basically, they have, yeah, the expectations have been surpassed and nobody,

  • yeah. Nobody really expected such a rise. This is very much linked to significant cost

  • reductions for most technologies. What we also see, however, that policy frameworks

  • play a very important and crucial role throughout the world. If we have a look at the renewable

  • energy in the world, what we can say is in 2013, and this is not a data of 2014 because

  • such care data is really not available in such a timely manner.

  • The share of renewables presented 19.1% of global final energy consumption. The share

  • of modern renewable energy increased up to 10.1%. What is important here is to keep in

  • mind that one of the objectives under SE4All is to also move basically the share from traditional

  • biomass towards modern bio-energy use, which really means an improvement of the energy

  • service in many developing countries in rural areas. We need to see these figures, again,

  • basically the rising energy demand. Global fine energy consumption has increased by about

  • 1.5% annually in recent years, and this is primarily driven by developing countries,

  • which also mean that there is really a need to look more on the renewable energy play

  • in these countries.

  • The good news of this year that despite the rising energy use for the first time for decades,

  • the global carbon emissions associated with energy consumption, this is really a result

  • of renewable energy deployment and energy efficiency measures. Let's look at the champions.

  • In terms of investment in renewable power and fuels, and this is not including hydropower

  • larger than 50 megawatts. China, the US, Japan, the UK, and Germany were the leader.

  • What is very interesting here is if you look at the investment relative to annual GDP,

  • we will have a completely different type of countries appearing. It's [inaudible], Kenya,

  • Honduras, Jordan, and Uruguay. And this is really important to keep in mind because it

  • shows that these countries really can be force runners in renewable energy deployment. In

  • terms of total capacity, what is interesting again is that, I mean you have, again, the

  • big countries, China, the US, Brazil, Germany, and Canada in this case, including hydropower.

  • However, when we have this relative to per capita data, we will see a list of Denmark,

  • Germany, Sweden, Spain, and Portugal, which are all European countries, and this can definitely

  • be explained by the fact that these countries have since a long time a very stable policy

  • framework providing good opportunities to develop renewables.

  • Now what we clearly see so I mentioned we're looking into the role of renewables in the

  • different sectors, in the power sector, renewables or, renewable energy development is really

  • the most dynamic in the power sector. Here renewables account for 27.7% of the global

  • power generation capacity and 22.8% of global electricity demand. What is very interesting

  • here is to see that this year, and it's for the first time, renewables made up to 59%

  • of the net additions to global power capacity and surpassed, basically, the additions in

  • the, the net additions in the coal, in the fossil fuel market, so that's really very

  • interesting news.

  • What is also interesting to keep in mind is when we are thinking about, and this is less

  • linked to distributed renewables, but still something important to keep in mind. When

  • we're thinking about the integration of a rival renewables, which is often mentioned

  • still as a major challenge on renewable energy during deployment. We see that when power,

  • for example, met approximately 40% of electricity demand in Denmark, 27% in Portugal, 21% in

  • Nicaragua. Solar PV capacity end of 2014 was enough to meet eight% of electricity demand

  • in Italy, 7.6 in Greece and 7 in Germany.

  • So there is, it is possible to have renewable energy at large [inaudible] here is also grid

  • connected ones. When we are looking now at the heating and cooling market, energy used

  • for heat accounted for about half of total world final energy consumption in 2014, which

  • shows that it's extremely important to really focus also on the heating and cooling sector.

  • Approximately eight% of the global heat demand was covered by renewable energy, by modern

  • renewable energy.

  • It's much more complicated to have real assessment and quantitative data on the share of traditional

  • biomass to this demand just because of the very decentralized and non-traded aspect of

  • the sector. The trends are clearly that there is a growing interest, although advanced systems

  • represent still a small fraction of the global market. There is loss potential, but there

  • is really compared to the power market rather a slow growth in this field. This is really

  • something which is to underline because it means that policy makers need to give it more

  • attention because having developed renewable energy, heating and cooling is really key

  • for the energy transition.

  • In the transport sector, we have a similar situation as in the heating sector. Renewables

  • accounted for an estimated 3.5% of global energy demand for road transfer in 2013 up

  • from two% in 2007. The primary focus today still lies on liquid biofuels, whether we're

  • looking to markets in these trained policies. However, what we see trend wise is really

  • the development of gaseous fuels and electricity which are not always directly linked to renewables,

  • but allow to really create pathways to integrate renewables into transportation.

  • I will not go into detail in all different renewable energy technology, but really focus

  • on the ones which are also relevant for distributed renewables. So when we are looking into wind

  • power, there is a total global capacity of 51 gigawatts, which was, no, sorry, of 370

  • gigawatts, and 51 gigawatt have been added in 2014. Compared to 2014, there is a 44%

  • increase, or in 2014, there was a 44% increase over 2013 markets. This is really a very,

  • very dynamic market, which is growing recently. Interestingly by the end of 2014, there were

  • at least 85 countries that had seen commercial wind activities. Seventy-four of them with

  • an install capacity of larger than ten megawatt, and 24 of them even larger than one gigawatt.

  • So wind is really a mainstream technology in the energy landscape. When it comes to,

  • 77 gigawatt. What is very interesting that more than 60% of all PV capacities in operations

  • worldwide were added over the past three years, and this is mainly due to significant and

  • unexpected cost reductions, which really, I mean costs some challenges in terms of policy

  • framework, so there were countries with really reduced their policy support for PV. However,

  • the, it also creates many opportunities because PV is now a technology which is cost efficient,

  • also, and applicable for distributed renewable energy activities in developing countries,

  • and find in ways to other applications.

  • When we look at the regional developments, we clearly see that Asia eclipse of all markets

  • and account for approximately 60% of global additions. Obviously with China, very active,

  • and in China, we also see that there is a strong increase in large scale power plants.

  • Bio-energy. So by the total primary energy demand from bio-mass was approximately of

  • 16,000 to 150 terawatt hours. Bio-mass was used to produce an estimated 12,500 terawatt

  • hours of heat, and the bio-power capacity increased by an estimated five gigawatt in

  • 2014, reaching a total of 93 gigawatt. What we see is that the split up is a larger is

  • linked to solid bio-mass, part of it them to municipal solid waste, bio-gas, and a little

  • part for bio-fuels, which are rather used in the transfer sector.

  • Here we clearly have a major challenge, which is have good, timely, continuous reliable

  • data. Again, bioenergy is really very decentralized in its use and its application. There are

  • multiple pathways from different sources to different energy uses. The energy carriers

  • are very often not traded, so it's a major challenge to have good data, and especially

  • with regard to the use of renewables, also for distributed renewables. There is a need

  • that the international community and all players really work together to improve the data citation

  • here. I took the example of solar panel heating and cooling just because it's really also

  • important to look into the heating and cooling market, and we see that for some technologies

  • which are decentralized, it's however possible to have better data and good data. So solar

  • panel heating and cooling reach a cumulative capacity of 374, sorry, here is an error.

  • I'm sorry for that.

  • Let me check this. I will need to check this because I'm not sure about the cumulative

  • capacity if the installed capacities, yes, oh, sorry. There is no error. The installed

  • capacity was 374.7 gigawatt thermal, and we had an increase in 2014 of 44 gigawatt thermal.

  • China account for nearly 81% of global market, so there is again a real focus on Asia. Technology

  • wise, there's a focus more and more on glaze water collectors. There was also slowdown

  • in market growth in 2014 which continued here, and this is really very much linked to the

  • distributed nature of that market on the one side, but also the reduced costs in power

  • technologies, renewable power technologies which basically make end users and project

  • developers choose, for instance, PV wind geothermal with heat pumps as an alternative to solar