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  • Coming up on Market to Market - Wildfires leave

  • more than burned timber and towns in their wake.

  • Government scientists search for foodborne

  • illnesses at the molecular level.

  • And a journey from field crops to vineyards through

  • the bottling of hopes and dreams.

  • Those stories and market analysis with Naomi Blohm,

  • next.

  • Funding for Market to Market is provided by

  • Grinnell Mutual.

  • You think differently about a customer when you

  • stand in the middle of his dreams.

  • We work to make sure you get covered right.

  • Grinnell Mutual -- a policy of working

  • together.

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  • available at grinnellmutual.com.

  • And by Sukup Manufacturing Company.

  • Offering a full line of grain drying and storage

  • equipment and steel buildings, Sukup

  • Manufacturing is on a mission to protect and

  • preserve your crop and the tools that produce it.

  • This is the Friday, August 21 edition of Market to

  • Market, the Weekly Journal of Rural America.

  • Hello, I'm Mike Pearson.

  • Next month the federal government could run out

  • of money and the Federal Reserve might raise

  • interest rates.

  • But this week the stock market stole the show

  • despite positive economic indicators.

  • According to the Commerce Department, housing starts

  • rose 0.2 percent in August - the strongest showing in

  • more than 7 years.

  • Data released by the Labor Department revealed the

  • Consumer Price Index rose 0.1 percent in July.

  • When volatile factors like food and energy prices are

  • removed, Core CPI matched the increase.

  • But low inflation and declining foreign markets

  • may sidetrack efforts by the Fed to raise interest

  • rates.

  • Even with positive economic news, plunging

  • overseas markets pushed Wall Street dramatically

  • lower.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500

  • had their worst finishes since October of 2014 with

  • the Dow sinking 528 points at Friday's close.

  • While the market appears to be cooling off, the

  • west continues to burn.

  • To date, this fire season has charred more acres

  • than any year in the past decade.

  • The U.S.

  • Forest Service has been spending $150 million a

  • week on the task and will likely devour its entire

  • firefighting budget by the end of the month.

  • Bone dry conditions present a clear and

  • present danger.

  • And this week, a few who "walk where the devil

  • dances" lost their own battle in this year's epic

  • war to protect towns and timber.

  • The battle against the western wildfires took a

  • deadly turn this week as three firefighters died

  • after a vehicle crash trapped them in what was

  • described as a "hellstorm" of flames.

  • This brings the death toll to 13 for the year.

  • The trio were members of the U.S.

  • Forest Service.

  • Four other firefighters were injured near the

  • north-central Washington town of Twisp.

  • Local officials have urged people in the

  • outdoor-recreation area to evacuate as wildfires

  • advanced through the region.

  • Tinder-dry conditions, high temperatures and

  • winds combined to fuel the inferno in the Evergreen

  • State.

  • One of the biggest fires is near the scenic Cascade

  • Mountain town of Chelan.

  • More than 155 square miles in central Washington have

  • been charred.

  • Nearly 3,000 people were ordered to evacuate the

  • area this week.

  • A major fruit-packer's warehouse in Chelan was

  • destroyed by fire which contained nearly 2 million

  • pounds of apples.

  • Washington is by far the nation's biggest apple

  • producer.

  • The amount of fires across the West is taxing crews

  • as the U.S.

  • military is being sent in to assist.

  • Rob Allen, Deputy Incident Commander: "Nationally,

  • the system is pretty tapped, there is a lot of

  • fires going on not only here, but in Washington,

  • in Oregon, Northern California still burning

  • up.

  • And things have started to pick up in Idaho, Montana

  • and Colorado.

  • Nationally we are at planning level 5.

  • Everything is being used right now, so competition

  • for resources is fierce." And the 29,000 fire

  • fighters in the west could get help from other

  • countries as they work to contain the nearly 1,000

  • fires ...

  • Cooler and calmer weather has given firefighters a

  • break in California and Idaho.

  • The massive 443-square mile Soda fire near the

  • Oregon/Idaho border is nearly contained.

  • At one point this week, almost 900 firefighters

  • were battling the blaze over.

  • Much of the scorched land was used by cattle and

  • sage grouse.

  • At least one farmer was seen herding about 200

  • head of cattle down the road to safety.

  • The U.S.

  • has the most abundant and affordable food supply on

  • earth.

  • Between the field and the table, the USDA has put

  • rules in place to protect that bounty.

  • Occasionally, that supply gets contaminated with

  • unwanted pathogens that make people ill.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are

  • responsible for notifying the public when tainted

  • products make it to grocery store shelves.

  • According to the CDC, foodborne illness costs

  • the U.S.

  • economy nearly $16 billion annually.

  • But agency scientists are always on the lookout for

  • new weapons to prevent, find and reduce the size

  • of the outbreaks.

  • The nation's top disease detectives are betting

  • genetic clues could help combat food poisoning

  • outbreaks.

  • The Centers for Disease Control says of the

  • roughly 48 million Americans infected every

  • year, about three-thousand die of foodborne

  • illnesses.

  • Jill Pollack/Silver Spring, Maryland: "I'm

  • normally very confident in the safety of the food I

  • am buying.

  • Certainly if I hear about something in the news I

  • might be more aware about a particular outbreak."

  • In the wake of last spring's bacterial

  • contamination of Blue Bell Creameries ice cream in

  • Texas, the CDC is expanding a pilot program

  • to ten states that fights back against potentially

  • deadly bacteria and viruses by decoding their

  • DNA.

  • Listeria, the third-leading cause of

  • death by food poisoning, and the culprit in the

  • Lone Star State contamination, is now a

  • top target in germ fighters' crosshairs.

  • Dr. Robert Tauxe/Deputy Director - Division of

  • Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases -

  • Centers For Disease Control and Prevention:

  • "By testing the DNA of the bacteria from people all

  • over the country we may find that people in

  • totally different places are infected with exactly

  • the same bacteria.

  • If we can figure out what it is that they have in

  • common, and show that yes that was the source of the

  • infection, we can find an outbreak even when it's

  • very small."

  • Armed with $30 million from Congress, the CDC is

  • taking advantage of faster and cheaper genome

  • sequencing technology.

  • In the future, government scientists hope to use the

  • game-changing approach across the nation to fight

  • more common bacteria like Salmonella and E.

  • Coli.

  • By identifying pathogens early, officials will be

  • able to warn consumers before widespread

  • outbreaks develop.

  • Those suffering under the drought in the West may

  • receive a reprieve if the predicted El Nino weather

  • system comes to pass.

  • And despite the fact that fruit and vegetable

  • producers continue to worry about where their

  • next drops of water will come from California wine

  • grape growers worry a little less.

  • Production of the specialty crop has been a

  • source of income since the ancient Greek's began

  • fermenting grapes.

  • Today, California vintners produce $24 billion of

  • product annually.

  • But Midwestern growers, once a powerhouse of

  • production, have been getting back into the act.

  • For some producers, the journey to the vineyard

  • has been a long one that has its roots in other

  • commodities.

  • Delaney Howell explains.

  • Headquartered just south of Sacramento, California,

  • is Lange Twins Family Winery and Vineyard.

  • Dating back 4 generations, the original vineyard was

  • planted just prior to the beginning of Prohibition,

  • in 1917.

  • The first generation of these Central Valley

  • vintners began with Lange's great-grandfather

  • who actually started with 135 acres of watermelons

  • in the Lodi area.

  • After success in the watermelon industry the

  • Lange family purchased a ranch nearby that came

  • with grapevines.

  • The decision was made to try both crops.

  • For many years, the family planted watermelons in

  • between the rows of grapes as they worked on

  • mastering the art of viticulture.

  • Since then, the farm has grown to approximately

  • 8,000 acres of wine grapes.

  • The 4.5 million vines produce 55,000 tons of

  • grapes annually.

  • Brad Lange, Co-Owner of LangeTwins: "So it is a

  • family run enterprise.

  • We were wine grape growers right up to about 2005,

  • 2006.

  • We made a decision to build our winery and so

  • it's a relatively new winery built over the last

  • nine years, by vertically integrating we are

  • ensuring, with that success, a

  • multi-generational farm family."

  • LangeTwins has three vineyards stretched across

  • two Central Valley counties.

  • The diverse locations have helped them in their four

  • year battle against the drought.

  • Brad Lange, Co-Owner of LangeTwins: "...the last

  • few years, three years, we have not had those heavy

  • spring rains that we typically have so there

  • isn't as much available rain water for the vine to

  • grow.

  • And so in the springtime, depending on the rainfall,

  • we just have to sit back and wait for the vine to

  • start running out of water.

  • Then we can start spoon feeding it with our drip

  • irrigation system.

  • So in that respect, we have an opportunity to

  • bring that vine into balance more quickly than

  • in a rainy year, like 1998, to where it was

  • raining heavily in June.

  • And so we have the opportunity to really

  • control the water that, the amount of water that

  • the vine will give.

  • So in that respect, the drought actually helps

  • us."

  • According to a study by the University of

  • California-Davis, the drought has already

  • rung-up $2.7 billion in damages due to lost crops,

  • livestock deaths, and increased payments for

  • pumping groundwater.

  • The whitepaper reveals an estimated 565,000 acres of

  • farmland will be fallowed due to severe drought, but

  • many viticulturists are thriving despite the harsh

  • conditions.

  • The Golden State ranks 1st in the nation for grape

  • production and 4th in the world for wine production,

  • behind Italy, France, and Spain.

  • But in the past few decades, California

  • winemakers have begun to see vintners in other

  • states bring out their own award winning vintages.

  • In the early 19th & 20th centuries many Midwestern

  • states dominated the grape industry with Iowa ranking

  • 6th in production.

  • The soaring success of wine production in the

  • Midwest was quickly stifled with the onset of

  • prohibition.

  • Farmers turned to growing grains and oil seeds to