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  • In this American English pronunciation video, we're going to go over using a Flap T to link

  • words.

  • Today we're going to study two different rules of pronunciation to develop one great habit

  • to smooth out your speech.

  • The first rule is that in informal, conversational American English, a T that comes between vowels,

  • or after an R consonant and before a vowel, will be pronounced as a Flap T, or just like

  • a D between vowels. For example, water. It's not wattter, ter, with a True T, it's

  • water, water.

  • The second rule is linking: In American English we like a very smooth line, with all

  • the words in one thought group connected. When we have a situation where one word ends

  • in a consonant and the next word begins in a vowel, we can think of the ending consonant

  • as beginning the next word to help us link. For example, the phrase 'on a': think of

  • the N as beginning 'uh': nuh, nuh, ah nuh, on a, on a.

  • So let's combine these two rules. If we have a word that ends in RT, or a vowel or

  • diphthong and T, and a following word that begins with a vowel, we want to use the T

  • to connect the two words, and that T becomes a Flap T. Let's look at some common examples.

  • Part of, part of. I want to note here that the V can be dropped, and the word 'of' can

  • be reduced just to the schwa. But, let's focus on the T. Part of, part of. It's a flap T.

  • It's part of the problem.

  • Sort of, sort of. Again, the V sound can be dropped. Sort of, -tof, -tof. Flap T. I'm

  • sort of disappointed.

  • At a, at a. Do you hear the flap T? At a, at a. It's connecting the two words. She's

  • at a birthday party.

  • That I, that I. Again, the ending T turning into a Flap T and connecting the two words.

  • That I. I thought that I was late.

  • Part of, sort of, at a, that I. These are common phrases. Practice them this way to

  • make your speech better linked and smoother. Do it any time you have a word ending in RT,

  • or a vowel/diphthong and T, followed by a word beginning with a vowel or diphthong.

  • It will get you closer to capturing the character of American English.

  • Practice your English: Record a sentence using part of, or sort of, or another example,

  • and post it as a video response to this video on YouTube. I can't wait to watch.

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

In this American English pronunciation video, we're going to go over using a Flap T to link

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B1 flap vowel american english nuh sort diphthong

Using Flap T to Link Words: American English Pronunciation

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    VoiceTube posted on 2015/06/29
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