Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • This is San Sebastian, also know as the Basque.

  • It's the capital of Gipuzkoa,

  • one of the three regions and it is also home to

  • some of the best chefs in Spain.

  • We had eaten a lot of truly delicious food on

  • our trip around the Basque country.

  • And now we were on our way to meet the Godfather

  • of Basque

  • Pretty excited to meet Martin Berasategui today.

  • He is the only seven star Michelin chef in Spain,

  • and apparently he's the shit.

  • When Berasategui began his career in

  • the mid '70s, there were no Michelin star

  • restaurants in the Basque country whatsoever.

  • But along with the other founders of

  • Bas Novel cuisine he's put the regions cooking

  • on the map and has opened top

  • notch restaurants all over the world.

  • I have focused my entire existence on the art of

  • gastronomy.

  • I started out in my family's restaurant.

  • And now it's 2014 and

  • I have seven Michelin stars in Spain.

  • I'm the chef with the most Michelin starts in

  • Spanish history.

  • I have a great team,

  • all of them are Martin Berasategui.

  • They fight for Martin and

  • they would die defending Martin.

  • Always wanting to please me as I

  • teach them all I know.

  • In my creative test lab,

  • we tried out different fish scales.

  • I found that red mullet scales could

  • be crystallised.

  • So here you see these scales all

  • facing this way, right?

  • So what I do is run my thumb across here and,

  • as you see, gently massage the scales.

  • We then place it here.

  • The technique is to pour piping hot olive

  • oil over the scales so they turn into crystals.

  • This is a natural reaction.

  • Now we add a pinch of salt and

  • the red mullet is done.

  • These are wild mushrooms in a red wine jus made

  • with a reduction of red mullet bones and livers.

  • I bring it to the boil and then add small cubes

  • of bluefish but only after it's boiled.

  • This is a celery and turnip sauce, some

  • rocks made of beetroot, and this is an ale foam.

  • So that's our latest creation with the edible

  • crystal scales technique.

  • I have a crush on this dish right now.

  • Take this away, it's collapsed.

  • This has collapsed, the foam has collapsed.

  • You have to eat it straight away.

  • Ok but, leave it there.

  • It may not look good but...

  • I said no.

  • Then put it in a Tupperware.

  • I said no.

  • But please, Martin.

  • No, we made it quickly for the cameras.

  • But can I eat that one now?

  • I said no.

  • You just do what I say.

  • Okay, it's your kitchen so

  • I'll do what you say but understand my pain.

  • If you come at two I'll give it to you.

  • Ok.

  • He won't let me do this.

  • If I make the ale foam for you now,

  • it'll be too bitter for my customers.

  • Martin, for fuck's sake.

  • I've been eating shitty home cooked

  • pasta for months.

  • And now you want to take this away from me?

  • What cruelty is this?

  • Give her the red mullet.

  • OK, I'll give you the red mullet.

  • It took some balls, but I wasn't going to leave

  • kitchen without trying that red mullet dish, and

  • it was well worth it.

  • My favourite dish from Basque cuisine,

  • it's such a simple dish, but

  • whoever thought of it was incredibly innovative.

  • It's hake kokotxas with pil pil sauce.

  • Everywhere we went in the Basque country.

  • People were talking about this weird little piece

  • of fish.

  • It wasn't just Martin's favorite,

  • Kokotxa's are an institution.

  • Who better to explain this

  • phenomenon than Michelin Star Chef, Danny Lopes.

  • The first time I take kokotxas was at home,

  • like most people here.

  • When you are a kid you don't really like

  • the gelatinous texture but after that you start

  • loving it because it's a classic Basque taste.

  • So, what is this bit?

  • It's this part here,

  • of the underside of the hake.

  • It used to be discarded.

  • They'd cut the head off and chuck it.

  • Until some sailors tried them and

  • found them delicious.

  • So we're going to prepare them in

  • the most traditional way.

  • Pil-pil is a gelatinous sauce produced by

  • the kokotxa itself and is the most traditional one.

  • Let's start.

  • First, we put a bit of garlic in here, okay?

  • Okay. Now grab some salt and

  • toss it all over while you

  • turn them with your other hand.

  • Touching fish, touching fish,

  • how I love to touch fish.

  • While you turn them with your other hand.

  • When the garlic starts to dance around it's

  • time to take it off the stove.

  • What's the worst thing you can

  • do to ruin the kokotxas?

  • Overcooking them, as they'll just melt.

  • We're going to

  • use the kokotxa's natural gelatine.

  • We're going to use

  • the kokotxa's natural gelatine.

  • Now move the pan like this, in circles.

  • We add a couple drops of water.

  • When you add the cold water,

  • the kokotxa reacts and produces more gelatine.

  • The plan is that as it's moved around,

  • the oil binds and emulsifies.

  • That's the one.

  • Wahey!

  • This is harder than it looks.

  • If we add any more oil it will split so

  • we add a bit more water.

  • It's all chemistry.

  • This really is something else.

  • Now we add the parsley.

  • Looking good already!

  • We heat it up again on a low flame.

  • Keep an eye out for them, OK?

  • When you see they're starting to.

  • What do I need to watch out for Dani?

  • Don't let it boil.

  • We're good.

  • I'll be with you in a second.

  • Fried garlic, red chili, and

  • we finish it off with parsley.

  • Perfect.

  • Here we have our kokotxas.

  • How was that?

  • Great, you did a great job.

  • See how delicate they are?

  • This is delicious.

  • You see how lightly cooked, how gelatinous it

  • is, but not too gelatinous, right?

  • There is just enough gelatine not

  • to taste weird or unpleasant.

  • It's just complementing the oil,

  • it sort of lingers in your mouth.

  • I love it.

  • I've arranged to meet a few friends and

  • we've prepared something for you.

  • We're taking you out for

  • pintxos in the old town of San Sebastian.

  • We'll taste a bit of everything and

  • we're going to have a good time.

  • I'm in your hands!

  • Yes, don't you worry!

  • Looking forward.

  • Little did we know that Dani's friends would turn

  • out to be Michelin star

  • chef's Gorka Txapartegi and Joxe Mari Arbelaitz.

  • These three guys have won every gastronomical war

  • between them.

  • But the prospect of and local wine still

  • lured them out of their kitchens.

  • This is delicious.

  • It has a powerful first wave with the wildflower

  • honey and then the gin leaves you nice and

  • warm inside, just how we like it.

  • Especially on a rainy day like today,

  • it's a really good drink.

  • At this rate we're gonna crawl out of here.

  • What is this rain?

  • The weather is always lovely here.

  • What would the green Basque Country be

  • without the rain?

  • The change of seasons means a change of

  • ingredients.

  • You feel again the excitement with the

  • season's first produce: our dear artichokes

  • arrive again, asparagus, each product has its

  • time so for that we need these seasonal shifts.

  • Going for pintxos means to enjoy.

  • And it's a way of understanding our

  • Basque gastronomy.

  • We're not just going to one bar.

  • We go to one, two, three, four or five bars.

  • Depending on what your body tells you and

  • how much money you have.

  • We're in Gandarias, another classic bar in

  • the old town, and as you can see they have lots of

  • different kinds of pintxos.

  • I recommend the grilled sirloin steak pintxo with

  • a bit of green pepper and Maldon salt.

  • That's nice.

  • And the mushrooms with garlic oil which

  • are also delicious.

  • So we share a bit, right?

  • Yeah, let's share.

  • Sharing is part of the pintxos spirit.

  • Coming through!

  • I like this one.

  • Eat it in one go.

  • No, no. Oh my!

  • Thanks guys.

  • It stopped raining, no more umbrellas.

  • Over here we have a lot of bars to choose from.

  • The one we're going to now has been open for

  • a really long time and back in the day

  • it always won the 'best pintxo' competitions and

  • it would always be down to their anchovies.

  • OK, here we are, Txepetxa.

  • Manu, how's it going?

  • Dani, what's up?

  • We've come to eat some pintxos as I've told them

  • that we can't miss trying your anchovies.

  • Which do you recommend?

  • You can choose something sweet or savory...

  • Sea urchin, olive urchin, olive pate, salmon,

  • blueberries, spider crab crema, papaya, coconut...

  • All sorts!

  • All sorts!

  • I think I'm going to try them all.

  • This is black olive pate on top of

  • a couple of anchovies with a bit of onion.

  • Tasty. This is salmon.

  • These are anchovies with trout caviar on toast.

  • So good.

  • Com on Jozemari, leave some for me.

  • This is the one that caught my attention.

  • It's a cut of tropical fruit, papaya.

  • It works.

  • To achieve top flavours with just two

  • ingredients is not easy.

  • Simplicity is the hardest thing to achieve.

  • Masterfully executed and

  • I'm not going to share any more with you.

  • This one is for me.

  • The anchovy is a very fine fish.

  • It has a very delicate taste.

  • She's drunk.

  • We're at one of the most typical bars.

  • It's called La Cepa.

  • It has some of the best you can find around here.

  • What have you ordered?

  • Want some Txakoli?

  • Of course,

  • a little Txakoli to kick things off.