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  • [MUSIC - REGINA SPEKTOR, "YOU'VE GOT TIME"]

  • [MUSIC - JAMIE N. COMMONS AND X AMBASSADORS, "JUNGLE"]

  • SAM: I like what you've done with the place.

  • PIPER: Sadly, it's starting to feel like home in here.

  • CRAZY EYES: Three, two, one, go!

  • [CHEER]

  • BROOKE: This is not how I imagined prison to be at all.

  • CINDY: [SINGING] Oh!

  • TIFFANY AND PIPER: Yay!

  • GALINA: A woman I knew a long time ago

  • came back in yesterday.

  • CRAZY EYES: Ooh.

  • VEE: I know.

  • CRAZY EYES: Who are you?

  • VEE: I'm Vee.

  • ROSA: You've got something to say to me?

  • PIPER: This place is bull--

  • SISTER INGALLS: There's a storm coming.

  • BOTH: What!

  • VEE: Boom, boom, boom!

  • BIG BOO: Ooh!

  • PIPER: I am lone wolf.

  • And a vicious one.

  • Don't make me rip your throat out.

  • CINDY: That's what I'm talking about!

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: Hi, everyone.

  • I'm Chelsey Kantor from the Google+ team.

  • And I'm here with three of the amazing cast members

  • from the recently Critic Choice-nominated for Best

  • Comedy Series, "Orange is the New Black."

  • Let's give it up.

  • NATASHA LYONNE: Thank you.

  • UZO ADOBA: Thank you.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: Starting on the end,

  • we have the lovely Miss Uzo Adoba, Suzanne "Crazy Eyes"

  • Warren.

  • And in the middle, we have Natasha Lyonne, Miss Nicky

  • Nichols.

  • And to my right, the one and only Yael Stone, Morello.

  • So I'm going to kick it ff here with a few questions for each

  • of you, and then a few for the group.

  • And then we'll open it up to people

  • in the room that have burning questions they want answered.

  • But I'm going to start with you.

  • And first congrats on your nomination for the Critics

  • Choice Award for what?

  • Featured Comedic Performer in a Series.

  • UZO ADOBA: Yes.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: Did you know you were in a comedy series?

  • UZO ADOBA: Good question.

  • You know, no-- yeah, I think there was this great balance

  • that Jenji-- Jenji Kohan who created our show--

  • has managed to keep with the show.

  • And I personally feel that in order for the world of comedy,

  • as I've heard Natasha say and countless others say,

  • that in order for that world to really exist,

  • you have to balance it well with the drama.

  • And the circumstance of where we are, that in itself

  • helps to set the tone of the drama.

  • But you know, tampons in a McMuffin are funny.

  • And peeing on the floor is funny.

  • NATASHA LYONNE: And tragic.

  • UZO ADOBA: And tragic.

  • Exactly.

  • It's a balance there.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: Tragically funny.

  • UZO ADOBA: That's right.

  • It's tragically funny.

  • That's exactly right.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: So the world got to know you as Crazy Eyes,

  • but I first knew you through "Godspell" on Broadway .

  • And then because of that, on "Project Runway All Stars."

  • So tell me about the transition from Broadway

  • and fashion to prison.

  • UZO ADOBA: Well, there is a very clear fashion statement

  • in prison.

  • And it is that there is none.

  • No, but even in the fashion though,

  • Jenn Rogien, who's our costume designer,

  • does a really amazing job with something

  • that's so uniform and singular and finding unique touches

  • and nuances when you look at everyone's costume,

  • to display an individuality and personality within that.

  • But I think it's really interesting whether it's

  • Poussey with the sweatshirt, or if you

  • have my own costume with the thumbs,

  • or Nicky with the rolled-up sleeves,

  • everybody has a touch of their outer self appearing

  • in their inner prison self, which is kind of cool.

  • But going from theater to television,

  • I thought it was going to be this massive leap of a world

  • that I didn't understand, just because

  • of the technical elements of the medium.

  • But what I really learned doing the show

  • was that good stories are good stories.

  • If the story is good, my job as the actor is made pretty easy.

  • And thankfully, the writers on our show

  • have made my job easier with their words

  • and have just been so phenomenally brilliant

  • at crafting a story that I could understand whether it's

  • on a stage of a theater or on a sound stage of a studio.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: So I heard a story

  • that you went in to audition for another part,

  • but then they offered you Crazy Eyes.

  • So can you tell us one, what part

  • that was, and what about your audition, what they saw in you

  • made you perfect for Miss Suzanne Warren?

  • UZO ADOBA: So sorry.

  • That's a good question that I too would like the answer for.

  • I went in originally, I went in and I auditioned

  • for the role of Janae, who's played brilliantly

  • by Vicky Jeudy on our show.

  • She's done a phenomenal job with it, and it's completely right

  • and makes sense for it.

  • I went and I read for that part, and then I got a phone call

  • from my representation.

  • And they said, we have really great news for you.

  • I said, OK, what?

  • What is it?

  • And they said, you remember that audition

  • you went on for "Orange is the New Black" this summer?

  • I said, yes, absolutely.

  • Because I remember reading that script

  • and thinking to myself of the things

  • that I had read that summer, wow, that was really good.

  • I would love if I could be a part of something like that.

  • That would be great.

  • And then continued on.

  • So when I got the call, and they said,

  • you remember that audition you went on for "Orange

  • is the New Black" this summer?

  • I said, yes!

  • Totally.

  • I absolutely remember.

  • They said, well, you didn't get it.

  • I said, OK, what's the good news that you--

  • you said there was good news?

  • And they said, but they'd like to offer you another part.

  • And I said, amazing!

  • What's the other part?

  • And they were like Crazy Eyes.

  • And I was still like, um, chicken and waffles,

  • like I don't know what that means, you know,

  • like what is that?

  • But when I read the script, it really

  • did feel like the right fit.

  • That just felt right.

  • CHELSEY KANTOR: So what about her was already on the page,

  • and what do you think you brought to that character?

  • UZO ADOBA: What was already on the page?

  • I think, definitely the essence of her truest essence,

  • which for me, I think, is the innocence,

  • and her want and need to give and get love

  • at it's fullest, was certainly there.

  • There's a line in the second episode of the script when

  • they're introducing Crazy Eyes.

  • Piper's coming into the cafeteria in

  • and I'm paraphrasing it now, It was written by Marco Ramirez,

  • but she's walking into the cafeteria

  • and she's looking for a place to sit.

  • And then she looks right and there sitting

  • there is-- turn the page-- Crazy Eyes.

  • And he had described her as someone

  • who is innocent like a child, except children aren't scary.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • And I thought that felt like the key

  • to the door that might open this character,

  • because someone who is innocent like a child,

  • to me meant that somebody who operates out

  • of impulse, who operates, who acts and then thinks.

  • Children don't have agendas.

  • They're not calculating.

  • They're not trying to do something for gai.

  • They're just doing it for the purity of it.

  • That animalistic survival instinct of quality