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  • London, London, London. Hi. James, from EngVid. Secret London. I was actually born here. Beautiful

  • place. Love it. Now, I want to teach you a lesson today on phrasal verbs. We're going

  • to work on five phrasal verbs.

  • But this is specific. These are business phrasal verbs, so if you're in business or you're

  • learning about business, these terms will come up regularly. Now, phrasal verbs and

  • idioms in English are used, and you're expected to know them like that. So let's go to the

  • board and see where's Mr. E.

  • Mr. E wants to teach us something today about "off". Well, the first thing we have to learn,

  • specifically, "off" has about five meanings. But today, we're going to concentrate on two.

  • And all of these ones here are basically going to, you know, relate to those two meanings.

  • "Off" either means to move away from something or to go down. All right? To make smaller

  • or reduce in size. And these phrasal verbs are used in business quite often. If you know

  • anything about what's happened in the last five years, you're going to go, "Oh, my gosh.

  • That's what they were talking about."

  • So let's talk about the first one, "take off". If you're like me and you work a lot --

  • I don't work a lot. Okay. I don't work lot. I'm being honest. But sometimes, you need

  • a vacation, and I take vacations. So you need to "take off". But in English, what we say

  • in business, when you go to your boss, and you say, "Boss, I would like some time off."

  • They will say, "Would you like to take some time off?" Or you might say, "I want to take

  • some time off in the summer. I want to take off a month." So you'll hear this phrase, "take off"

  • "take off". And it means for vacation. But there's also another meaning, which is really,

  • really good. And this is -- remember; we're talking about "away from" when we're talking

  • about "off" because of "take off". You can see the airplane. The airplane takes off.

  • That's for your vacation because I know you're going somewhere sunny like Canada in January.

  • Anyway. Don't come here in January. It's not sunny; it's cold.

  • But another thing -- see how the airplane is taking off, so it means it's leaving? Airplanes

  • go up. When somebody goes up and things are going really well, they say, "My business

  • is taking off." It means it's doing well. So your boss might say -- or he or she might

  • say, "I really want this idea to take off because it will be good for the company."

  • It means they want the idea to be successful. If something takes off, it's successful. "We

  • started a new water brand, and it's taking off in Italy." They love it. Canadian water.

  • Who knew? Okay? And it "took off". It means it's successful. It's doing really well.

  • Now, let's look at another one. This is close to my heart because recently, I found out

  • there's a company across the sea -- imagine a country called "India" -- where they actually

  • took everything about me except my face and my name, and wrote my bio out. It's called

  • a "rip off". But we'll get to that.

  • If you have a store and you have products --books or markers, okay -- and you see someone

  • come in, and then they take it, and they run out of your store, and they don't pay you,

  • you would say, "I wasn't paid." You can say, "That person ripped me off." That means that

  • person stole from me. And we use that for when someone takes physical objects and takes

  • them without paying from a store. So you can say, "The store was ripped off" because the

  • product was taken and no money was given for it." Okay? That's one form of "to rip off".

  • Another is if you were the customer or client. If you go to my store and I sell this water

  • for five dollars, and then you walk to Mr. E's store and see the exact same water but

  • more water inside going for one dollar, you'll say, "I was ripped off." It's similar to being

  • stolen from because what it means is, "I paid more than the value of the object." The object

  • is only worth a dollar, but these people made me pay five. I feel ripped off. Something

  • was taken from me, and it wasn't fair. I didn't get the value. Rip off. Water is a rip off.

  • It's free, people. Check the clouds. It comes down regularly. Anyway. Next.

  • The next thing for "rip off" is to steal an idea. Told you this was business phrasal verbs.

  • Lots of times, McDonald's says, "Burger King's got a new burger. Let's rip it off." And they

  • make the same product, and they call it the McSomething.

  • Burger King did it first; McDonald's steals it.

  • I'll give you a great example. Samsung and Apple. Okay, people. Don't sue me. It's in

  • the papers. It's real. Apple had a product where you could touch the screen and move

  • everything. Brilliant. Millions of people bought it. Samsung looked at it and went,

  • "That's a damn good product. We like it." So they took the idea. They didn't ask Apple.

  • They didn't pay Apple. They stole the idea. Now, remember; the first stealing is to take

  • physical objects. In this case, they stole the idea, and they made the Samsung. People

  • love the Samsung. In fact, they ripped it off, but they made it better. But Apple sued

  • them -- that means took them to court -- and said, "You must pay us." And Samsung had to

  • pay because they stole the idea. So someone rips off your idea; they steal the idea from

  • you. It's yours. And you know, it's like a book. And they tear a page out of the book.

  • They take that page and steal it. It belongs in the book, not to them. Okay?

  • So that was "off", and that's how we talk about "away from", "to take something away

  • from something else".

  • Now, let's talk about phrasal verbs "off" and "going down". Here, if I'm off-screen

  • for a second -- I'll come back. I promise you. Here's Mr. E. He's going to look down,

  • and you will see. Look. "Sell off." If you have too many -- "I have too many. I don't

  • want this many. I need to sell them off." If I ask you to buy for five dollars, you

  • say "no", and I keep them. So then, I say, "If I reduce the price" -- make the price

  • go down --" I can sell them. At five dollars, nobody buys. But now, I say one dollar. I

  • sell them all. It's a sell off." It means to reduce the price by a large amount in order

  • to get people to buy them so you can get rid of them. Right? You don't want them anymore.

  • You want to sell them. Reduce the price, and you say it's a "sell off", meaning, "We want

  • to get rid of it, and it's a price lower, better for you, the consumer or the client

  • or customer." So to reduce the price, to reduce the number that you have, so everything goes down.

  • What's another one? Well, another one we want to talk about is "lay off". My man here is

  • saying, "I want to work." There's a problem. "I want to work?" Why is he saying that? Well,

  • a "layoff" is when a company, for some reason, must reduce its workers because they don't

  • have money or materials to work with. Maybe they make cars, and there's not enough tires,

  • wheels for the cars. So they can't make any. They have to tell some people, "Go home. There's

  • no work for you. And because there's no work, we can't pay you. So you can't work here."

  • So the worker is asked not to work, not because they did anything wrong -- that's being called

  • "fired". They're not fired. They've done everything okay. The company has no money or materials

  • to work with, so they're laid off. The difference between being fired and laid off is this.

  • If you are laid off, the company is saying if things get better, we will call you back

  • to work. When you're fired, that's it, Sucker. You're out. Okay? You don't work there anymore.

  • But in this case, they're saying, "We're going to call you back. We just don't have the money

  • or the materials." My man wants to work. He's like, "I did nothing wrong. I want to work.

  • Why am I lying down?" Sorry. No work. Okay?

  • Next one we're going to do is "write off". See the big zero? I did a video before where

  • we talked about a write off when you reduce it down to zero. So you can look at that.

  • Check it out. Video with "off" and what "off" means. But in this case, it's different. I

  • didn't talk about this because this is a business term that I didn't think the general student

  • would want to see. When you have a "write off" in business, it means you have an expense

  • that the government considers not taxable. "What was that?" You should say, "Say that

  • again?" Well, in most countries that have capitalism or do -- you know, exchange money

  • for goods, you get taxed. And what the government says is when you have a write off, it says

  • that if you're running a business, to have a business, you need certain things. You need

  • markers. You need computers. You don't make money for them because you have to buy them.

  • But if you don't have them, you don't have a business. So your government says, "Look,

  • if you buy these things, we will reduce the tax that you pay us." "What?" You say. "Government

  • giving money back?" Like Yoda. "Money back? Government? No." Yes. So when you get a write

  • off, you can say sometimes it's for eating dinner, buying your suits, buying pens or

  • computers or paper. The government says, "You need these to work with, so you get a write

  • off. We will reduce the tax you have to pay." And you thought you weren't going to get anything

  • from here, right? You did. It's not a rip off. I'm working hard for you. Okay?

  • So these are the five. So I'm going to give you a little story. I want you to think about

  • the story because in English, if your English is good, you can take multiple things and

  • put them together and make it make sense. Then, you can watch the video again and do

  • the quiz at EngVid. All right? Quickly. So let's go.

  • I took off from work one day because, you know, I went on my vacation. And you know,

  • the company was doing really well. We had taken off in sales, so I took off and took

  • my vacation. But then, I found out one of the employees, Mr. E, was ripping us off and

  • selling our secrets to the Indian people. Because of that, there were many, many layoffs

  • in the company, and a lot of people, good people, couldn't work. This is terrible. But

  • lucky me, I came back and because I was doing well, I got to write off my trip and my vacation."

  • So go do the quiz. See how you do. And if you don't do well, come and watch the video

  • again. And by the way, Indian people -- not upset with you. Just have to use a country.

  • Next time, I'll use the United States that rips off everybody. Anyway. E, I'm out. I'm

  • taking off. See you.

London, London, London. Hi. James, from EngVid. Secret London. I was actually born here. Beautiful

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 phrasal reduce samsung sell vacation ripped

"OFF" Phrasal Verbs - Business English

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    Sam posted on 2015/03/28
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