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  • President Obama: Please have a seat.

  • Good afternoon, everybody.

  • This month marks a notable anniversary --

  • 200 years since the Battle of New Orleans.

  • Here in America, we call it a great victory over

  • a mighty United Kingdom.

  • Our British friends call it a technicality.

  • The treaty ending the war was signed weeks before.

  • Either way, we've long since made up.

  • On this 200th anniversary of a great American victory,

  • we count the United Kingdom as one of our

  • greatest friends and strongest allies.

  • And today it's a great pleasure to welcome

  • Prime Minister David Cameron back to the White House.

  • Now, as many of you know, David recently noted how

  • comfortable the two of us are working together.

  • This sent some commentators into a tizzy.

  • Some explored the linguistic origins of the word "bro."

  • Others debated its definition.

  • Several analyzed how this term has evolved over time.

  • Some seemed confused and asked -- what does Obama mean?

  • And so, let me to put this speculation to rest.

  • Put simply, David is a great friend.

  • He's one of my closest and most trusted partners

  • in the world.

  • On many of the most pressing challenges that

  • we face, we see the world the same way.

  • We recognize that, as I've said before,

  • when the United States and United Kingdom stand together,

  • our nations are more secure and our people are more

  • prosperous, and the world is safer and more just.

  • Great Britain is our indispensable partner,

  • and David has been personally an outstanding partner,

  • and I thank you for your friendship.

  • With both of our economies growing and unemployment

  • falling, we used our working dinner last night to discuss

  • how we can help create more jobs for our people.

  • We believe that this needs to be the year when the United States

  • and the European Union make real progress toward the

  • Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

  • And we share the view that boosting demand

  • in Europe can also keep our economies growing.

  • As innovative economies in this information age,

  • we're expanding our collaboration on digital

  • technologies to improve how our governments serve

  • our citizens and businesses.

  • Given the urgent and growing danger of cyber threats,

  • we've decided to expand our cooperation on cybersecurity

  • to protect our critical infrastructure,

  • our businesses and the privacy of our people.

  • And as leaders in the global fight against climate change,

  • we believe that a strong commitment to reducing

  • greenhouse gases will be an essential element of any

  • ambitious climate agreement that we seek in Paris this

  • year and that this actually will help spur the creation

  • of more clean energy jobs on both sides of the Atlantic.

  • With regard to security, American-British unity is

  • enabling us to meet challenges in Europe and beyond.

  • We agree on the need to maintain strong sanctions

  • against Russia until it ends its aggression in Ukraine,

  • and on the need to support Ukraine as it implements

  • important economic and democratic reforms.

  • We agree that the international community

  • needs to remain united

  • as we seek a comprehensive diplomatic solution

  • to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.

  • And I'd add that additional sanctions on Iran at this

  • time would undermine that international unity

  • and set back our chances for a diplomatic solution.

  • And as the two leading contributors

  • to the global response to Ebola in West Africa,

  • we urge the world to continue stepping up with the resources

  • that are required so that we don't simply stop this

  • disease, we do more to prevent future epidemics.

  • Now, much of our discussion obviously

  • focused on the continuing threat of terrorism.

  • And in the wake of the vicious attacks in Paris,

  • as well as the news surfacing out of Belgium,

  • today we continue to stand unequivocally not only with

  • our French friends and allies, but with also all

  • of our partners who are dealing with this scourge.

  • I know David joins me when I say that we will continue

  • to do everything in our power to help France seek the justice

  • that is needed and that all our countries are working

  • together seamlessly to prevent attacks and to defeat

  • these terrorist networks.

  • With our combat mission in Afghanistan over,

  • we're also focused with our NATO allies on advising

  • and assisting and equipping Afghan forces to secure their

  • own country and deny to al Qaeda any safe haven there.

  • We'll continue to count on our British allies as our --

  • one of our strongest counterterrorism partners,

  • whether it's helping countries fight back against

  • al Qaeda affiliates or Boko Haram in Nigeria.

  • We reviewed our coalition's progress against ISIL.

  • We are systematically taking out their fighters,

  • we're destroying their infrastructure,

  • we are putting them on the defensive and helping

  • local forces in Iraq push these terrorists back.

  • And David and I agree that we need to keep stepping

  • up the training of Iraqi forces, and that

  • we're not going to relent until this

  • terrorist organization is destroyed.

  • The Paris attacks also underscored again how

  • terrorist groups like al Qaeda and ISIL are actively

  • trying to inspire and support people within

  • our own countries to engage in terrorism.

  • I led a special session of the United Nations Security Council

  • last fall to rally the world to meet the threat

  • of foreign terrorist fighters, including coming from Syria.

  • David and the United Kingdom continue to be strong

  • partners in this work, including sharing

  • intelligence and strengthening border security.

  • At the same time, we both recognize that intelligence

  • and military force alone is not going

  • to solve this problem.

  • So we're also going to keep working together on strategies

  • to counter the violent extremism that radicalizes,

  • recruits and mobilizes people, especially young people,

  • to engage in terrorism.

  • And local communities -- families, neighbors,

  • faith leaders -- have a vital role to play in that effort.

  • We also look forward to welcoming our British friends

  • to our summit next month on countering violent terrorism.

  • Because whether in Europe or in America,

  • a critical weapon against terrorism is our adherence

  • to our freedoms and values at home -- including

  • the pluralism and the respect and tolerance

  • that defines us as diverse and democratic societies.

  • And finally, I want to take this opportunity

  • to publicly congratulate David on last month's

  • Stormont House Agreement.

  • It's a tribute to the courage and determination

  • of everyone involved, especially the leaders

  • of Northern Ireland as well as the governments

  • of Ireland and the United Kingdom.

  • The United States was pleased to play a small role

  • in achieving this agreement, and we're going to keep

  • doing what we need to do to support the peace process

  • and a better future for the people of Northern Ireland.

  • So with that, let me turn it over to my good friend,

  • David Cameron.

  • Prime Minister Cameron: Well, thank you very much, Barack.

  • And thank you for welcoming me again to the White House.

  • You are a great friend to Britain and to me personally.

  • As leaders, we share the same values and, as you said,

  • on so many issues, we see the world in the same way.

  • And most of the time, we speak the same language.

  • (laughter)

  • In the last six years since you became President,

  • and in the nearly five since I've been Prime Minister,

  • we've faced some big issues on our watch.

  • And those challenges have boiled down to one word: Security.

  • Economic security -- the jobs and the living

  • standards of our citizens -- and national security --

  • the ability of our peoples to live safely and in peace.

  • And at the heart of both issues are the values

  • that our countries cherish: Freedom of expression,

  • the rule of law, and our democratic institutions.

  • Those are the things that make both our countries strong

  • and which give us confidence that even in the midst

  • of the most violent storms, with strong leadership,

  • we will come through to safer, to calmer

  • and to brighter days.

  • During your presidency, you've had to deal

  • with the aftermath of a massive banking crisis

  • and a deep recession.

  • When I became Prime Minister, Britain had

  • the highest budget deficit in its peacetime history,

  • our economy was in grave peril.

  • Five years ago, we had 110,000 troops serving

  • together in Afghanistan.