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  • [ Silence ]

  • >> My name is Javert.

  • Was that at least as good as Russell Crowe?

  • OK, so we're ready to get started.

  • First a quick quote, "Chemistry is to biology,

  • what notation is to music."

  • To me this really grabs at the essence of chemical biology

  • in the sense that the notations

  • on a musical scale allow creativity.

  • They allow other reformers to interpret the works in new ways

  • and give the work context.

  • Chemistry does that in biology.

  • Chemistry gives us an opportunity for us

  • to be creative about biology and invent new ways

  • of thinking about biology.

  • It's sort of the underlying basis at the level of atoms

  • and bonds as I keep saying, for biology,

  • and to me in some way this really captures what we're

  • trying to do in this class.

  • OK. So this week, where it's already week 3

  • which is amazing-- Oh, hang on.

  • OK, so it's week 3 so we're up to chapter 3 and we're going

  • to be talking about DNA.

  • Our knowledge of DNA was really set in place

  • by the people in front of you.

  • These are the giants really in the field of structural biology

  • who determined structures of DNA in the 1950s.

  • This includes the great Rosalind Franklin whose very accurate

  • x-ray diffraction structures and her pictures

  • of the x-rays diffracting off the fibers of DNA set

  • in motion the determination of the structure.

  • She was working with Maurice Wilkins and two physicists,

  • Francis Crick and Jim Watson went

  • on to solve the structure of DNA.

  • And as we'll see in a moment,

  • really one of their key insights was at the level of atoms

  • and bonds in the sense that they discovered interesting

  • tautomerization of the DNA bases that made it possible

  • to have what we now call Watson-Crick base pairing

  • between the strands of DNA.

  • Getting a little ahead of myself but that's where we're going

  • in the next week or so.

  • So we're going to be finishing

  • up non-covalent interactions then talking

  • about DNA structure, DNA property

  • and finally DNA reactivity of small molecules.

  • This is a large chapter.

  • We have a lot to talk about, so bear with me.

  • Things are going to go not faster it's going

  • to be the same speed, but we're going to gloss

  • through a few topics that are less important and when we do,

  • this means then that you can focus your reading

  • and your study just on the level of detail

  • that we're covering in the class.

  • OK. Some announcements, in the textbook, read chapter 3.

  • Again, skim concepts not presented in lecture,

  • don't get too worked up about them.

  • Chapter 3 problems, do all of the odd numbered and all

  • of the asterisked problems.

  • In addition, I want to encourage you

  • to get involved here at UC Irvine.

  • This is super important.

  • Many of you I know aspire to become physicians or scientists

  • or pharmacists or whatever it is that you aspire to do.

  • All those big plans require preparation,

  • they require some evidence that you've gone beyond the ordinary

  • and I want to encourage you to do this.

  • OK. One way to get involved is to look

  • around for opportunities to volunteer.

  • This is one that's run by my friend who is one

  • of the founders, it's called the Social Assistance Program

  • for Vietnam.

  • If you go to this website, there are opportunities to volunteer

  • to spend two weeks in Vietnam, in a rural part

  • of Vietnam administering medicine, you know.

  • You'll probably not be of course, you know,

  • drilling people's teeth and, you know, doing open heart surgery

  • but you will get a unique opportunity

  • to actually see those types of things happening

  • and that's really important if you aspire

  • to that kind of career.

  • It provides evidence that you're qualified, that you're committed

  • and that you're someone who is altruistic.

  • All of those things professional and graduate schools look

  • for in your application.

  • You need to be doing those things now.

  • OK. And I'm on your side on this.

  • OK. I will help you get-- find those opportunities.

  • I'll bring them to your attention like this one.

  • And if there's something in particular that I can do

  • to connect you with, let me know

  • and I'll do my very best on your behalf.

  • OK. Along those lines, our laboratory always has openings

  • for talented undergraduates.

  • It's competitive but you have a chance to participate

  • at the full level of a graduate student.

  • Undergraduates in our laboratory are doing actual science.

  • They're publishing papers with us.

  • They're making discoveries and they're participating

  • as full members of the team.

  • OK. Here's how you apply,

  • send me a paragraph describing your career goals

  • and how research

  • in our laboratory would advance those career

  • and educational goals.

  • In addition, send me a copy of your college level transcripts.

  • This includes any transcripts at community colleges

  • if you're transferring.

  • Many of my best students are transfer students.

  • Send me those transcripts as well

  • and also send me three names and email addresses of TAs

  • who know you well in lab sections.

  • OK? And I'm going to email them and I'm going

  • to ask them what was this person like in the laboratory?

  • Were they, you know, the first one out of the room?

  • Were they last one out of the room?

  • Did they, you know, follow you

  • around the laboratory asking you,

  • "Does this look pink, does this look pink?"

  • or were they pretty independent, OK?

  • So I'll find out about that sort of thing

  • and then that's how I make a decision on who

  • to accept into the laboratory.

  • OK. And then of course the resume.

  • This is pretty standard, if you're interested

  • in doing research here at UC Irvine which I highly,

  • highly encourage you to do,

  • this is a pretty good way to go about it.

  • OK. This is an effective way to get noticed and to get

  • that job that you need.

  • OK. Any questions about these opportunities?

  • Why I think they're important and things like that?

  • OK. See me in office hours if there's something in particular

  • that you want from me and I'll try to hook you up.

  • OK, office hours this week, speaking of which.

  • Tomorrow I'll have my usual office hour,

  • 2.45 to 3.45, the usual location.

  • Thursday I'll have my office hour 11 to 1, usual location.

  • In addition, Mariam will have her office hour Fridays 1:30

  • to 2.30.

  • And, Kritika, could you raise your hand?

  • So, Kritika is our new TA.

  • She'll be joining in the team.

  • And Kritika, does this time work for you, Tuesdays 2:30 to 3:30?

  • Good. OK. And she'll be having her office hours Tuesday.

  • So notice that we spread out our office hours

  • so that there's one everyday of the week except Monday

  • because I know you're very busy

  • on Monday doing all kinds of things.

  • I hope you're having fun yesterday.

  • But yeah, so everyday of the week there's an office hour,

  • they're staggered so they're at different times,

  • so you can have your questions answered.

  • And again, Kritika is a graduate student in my laboratory.

  • She knows this material as well as I do.

  • She's really smart.

  • You can go to her office hour and get an answer.

  • That's as good as an answer that I will give you.

  • OK? And for that matter you can also email the TAs

  • with your abundant questions.

  • OK. I'm looking at you where I can find that person, OK,

  • there's like one person in the class,

  • he send me 10 emails a day but, you know, I will do my best

  • but you can also email the TAs as well.

  • OK. Oh, along those lines,

  • I sent you an email saying don't send me book

  • or potential journal articles.

  • And the reason is I must do-- I open my inbox and I had like 15

  • of those and I got to the point where I was bouncing messages

  • because the inbox was so full.

  • So, if you send me those, I can't do very much with them,

  • OK, it might clog my box.

  • So what I propose we do is instead of you emailing me