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  • The President: Today, I want to take a few minutes

  • to speak with you-directly and clearly-about Ebola:

  • what we're doing about it, and what you need to know.

  • Because meeting a public health challenge

  • like this isn't just a job for government.

  • All of us-citizens, leaders, the media-have

  • a responsibility and a role to play.

  • This is a serious disease, but we can't give in to hysteria

  • or fear-because that only makes it harder to get

  • people the accurate information they need.

  • We have to be guided by the science.

  • We have to remember the basic facts.

  • First, what we're seeing now is not an "outbreak"

  • or an "epidemic" of Ebola in America.

  • We're a nation of more than 300 million people.

  • To date, we've seen three cases of Ebola diagnosed here -

  • the man who contracted the disease in Liberia,

  • came here and sadly died; the two courageous nurses who

  • were infected while they were treating him.

  • Our thoughts and our prayers are with them,

  • and we're doing everything we can to give them

  • the best care possible.

  • Now, even one infection is too many.

  • At the same time, we have to keep this in perspective.

  • As our public health experts point out,

  • every year thousands of Americans die from the flu.

  • Second, Ebola is actually a difficult disease to catch.

  • It's not transmitted through the air like the flu.

  • You cannot get it from just riding on a plane or a bus.

  • The only way that a person can contract the disease

  • is by coming into direct contact with the bodily fluids

  • of somebody who is already showing symptoms.

  • I've met and hugged some of the doctors

  • and nurses who've treated Ebola patients.

  • I've met with an Ebola patient who recovered,

  • And I'm fine.

  • Third, we know how to fight this disease.

  • We know the protocols.

  • And we know that when they're followed, they work.

  • So far, five Americans who got infected with Ebola

  • in West Africa have been brought back

  • to the United States-and all five have been treated

  • safely, without infecting healthcare workers.

  • And this week, at my direction,

  • we're stepping up our efforts.

  • Additional CDC personnel are on the scene

  • We're working quickly to track and monitor anyone who may

  • have been in close contact with someone showing symptoms.

  • We're sharing lessons learned so other hospitals

  • don't repeat the mistakes that happened in Dallas.

  • The CDC's new Ebola rapid response teams will deploy

  • quickly to help hospitals implement the right protocols.

  • New screening measures are now in place at airports

  • that receive nearly all passengers arriving

  • from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

  • And we'll continue to constantly review our measures,

  • and update them as needed, to make sure we're

  • doing everything we can to keep Americans safe.

  • Finally, we can't just cut ourselves off from

  • West Africa, where this disease is raging.

  • Our medical experts tell us that the best way to stop this

  • disease is to stop it at its source-before it spreads

  • even wider and becomes even more difficult to contain.

  • Trying to seal off an entire region of the world-if that were

  • even possible-could actually make the situation worse.

  • It would make it harder to move health workers

  • and supplies back and forth.

  • Experience shows that it could also cause people

  • in the affected region to change their travel, to evade

  • screening, and make the disease even harder to track.

  • So the United States will continue to help lead

  • the global response in West Africa.

  • Because if we want to protect Americans from Ebola here

  • at home, we have to end it over there.

  • And as our civilian and military personnel serve in the region,

  • their safety and health will remain a top priority.

  • As I've said before, fighting this disease will take time.

  • Before this is over, we may see more isolated cases

  • here in America.

  • But we know how to wage this fight.

  • And if we take the steps that are necessary,

  • if we're guided by the science-the facts,

  • not fear-then I am absolutely confident that we can prevent

  • a serious outbreak here in the United States,

  • and we can continue to lead the world in this urgent effort.

The President: Today, I want to take a few minutes

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Weekly Address: What You Need to Know About Ebola

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    稲葉白兎 posted on 2014/10/25
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