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  • Hello everyone, my name is Dylan and welcome to another video.

  • If you are new here, hi there. I post fun and entertaining English lessons every single Friday.

  • Today, I'm going to be sharing five everyday expressions that will help you to sound more like a native British speaker.

  • As always, everything we cover in today's lesson will be included in a free PDF.

  • You don't need to enter your email address, just hit the link in the top comment and press download.

  • Right guys, let's do this.

  • So, the first expression does sound a bit weird.

  • It sounds like it probably isn't that commonly used but I promise you, this is an everyday expression and it's one that I personally use a lot as well.

  • So, the expression is, "I'll eat my hat." I'll eat my hat.

  • So, what does this mean?

  • Well, this is used when you think that something is very unlikely to happen.

  • So, you're kind of saying, if this thing happens, I will be so surprised that I'll eat my hat.

  • It's almost like you're making a bet with someone.

  • Now that you know what it means, you are probably wondering to yourself, "Well, that sounds cool but how do I use that in my daily life?"

  • Let me tell you.

  • So, there are two main ways that this expression is used.

  • The first way and the most common way, in my opinion, is to say, "I'll eat my hat if... (unlikely thing happens)."

  • So," I'll eat my hat if pigs start flying."

  • You know, you don't think it's going to happen.

  • If it does, you'll be so surprised you will actually eat your hat.

  • Well, you might not actually do it but, you know, you might.

  • Who knows? We don't really have very good food here so it's always an option.

  • Let me give you an example, right?

  • So, I was with my friends the other day and we were sat in a bar having a drink.

  • We were waiting on one of our other friends to join us and he was saying that he was going to be with us in 20 minutes.

  • Now, I know this guy, right?

  • He is a dear friend but I must admit he is a little bit of a sloth in general.

  • Like, this guy is always late to everything.

  • I'm hardly one to talk but this guy is even worse than me, right?

  • So, he said, "I'll be there in 20 minutes." and I said, "Yeah, right. I'll eat my hat if you're here in 20 minutes."

  • So, it just shows that this thing is so unlikely to happen.

  • I'll eat my hat if it does happen.

  • So, the second way that you can use this expression is to play the old Uno reverse card, switch it up and actually start by saying the unlikely thing.

  • So, if you're here in 20 minutes, I'll eat my hat.

  • As mentioned, I personally prefer the first method.

  • I think it's more common.

  • I think it flows a bit better as well.

  • But you can use whichever one you prefer.

  • By the way, this expression actually originates from Charles Dickens himself.

  • So, it's very British indeed.

  • Number two and I really like this one because I can fully visualize it in my mind whilst I'm saying it.

  • So, the expression is, "nothing is set in stone."

  • Nothing is set in stone.

  • Nothing set in stone.

  • So, this expression sounds really cool but what does it actually mean?

  • Right, let's start by looking at the opposite of this expression.

  • If something is set in stone, it means that it has already been decided, right?

  • It's going to be very hard, if not, impossible to change.

  • Let me just show you this picture right here, okay?

  • So, this picture shows a message that is literally set in stone.

  • So, how are you going to change that?

  • It's going to be hard, right?

  • You know, unless you are an extremely skilled stone carver.

  • In which case, you know, fair play, mate.

  • Therefore, when we say that "nothing is set in stone," this just means that it can be changed, right?

  • It isn't set in stone.

  • It isn't too late to change it.

  • So, let me just show you some examples of how we might use this in an everyday situation.

  • So, the first thing you need to know is that this is most commonly used when you are making plans with someone.

  • Just to let them know there is an element of flexibility.

  • You know, we can change these plans if we need to.

  • For example, I was speaking to one of my students the other day and I said something like, "So I've got you booked in for next Tuesday at 6 p.m. But, you know, nothing's set in stone. We can change it if you want."

  • Let me give you another example.

  • "So, basically mate, the plan for your party is to meet at 6, go for some dinner at 7 and play some darts at 8. But, you know, nothing's set in stone."

  • "Um, okay, cool. But, wasn't this supposed to be a surprise party?"

  • So, in this example, it just means that these plans can be changed.

  • Nothing is set in stone.

  • "So, how do I use this?" I hear you ask.

  • Well, you would normally just say "(Whatever the plan is), but nothing's set in stone."

  • We're going to play some football at two o'clock tomorrow but nothing's set in stone.

  • Expression number three is used to say that something is good but in the most British way possible.

  • So, what do I mean by that?

  • Well, British people are intrinsically reserved in most areas of life.

  • So, we don't like to be too loud, too outgoing, and most notably, we don't like to be too optimistic either.

  • I'm not just saying we're all a bunch of negative Nancys.

  • However, we are just quite reserved in our praise.

  • We're cautious.

  • We don't like getting too excited about things.

  • And I think that this next expression kind of epitomizes that.

  • "So, what is this magical, depressing, pessimistic British way of expressing joy?" I hear you ask.

  • Well, let's say that something good happens.

  • Instead of us getting all excited and saying, "Oh, wow, this thing is incredible, it's brilliant, it's amazing, it's fantastic."

  • We might instead say, "Oh, all right, okay, yeah, not too shabby."

  • So, the third expression is "not too shabby."

  • Not too shabby.

  • Oh, you know, it's not too shabby.

  • And if something is not too shabby, it just means that it's pretty good, right?

  • It's not amazing, but it's pretty good, you know, it's not bad.

  • So, the word "shabby" has two meanings.

  • It can even mean that something is bad, more specifically in bad condition.

  • And it can also mean that something is unfair as well.

  • So, when we say that something is not too shabby, we are just saying that this thing isn't bad and it isn't unfair either.

  • Therefore, it's pretty good, you know, it's not too shabby.

  • So, this is just our reserved way of saying that something is good without showing too much emotion, right, without giving too much praise.

  • Let me show you some examples.

  • "All right, mate, how's the new job going?"

  • "It's great."

  • "I get paid a million pounds a month and, oh, guess what? I get 20 days of holiday as well."

  • "What? Really? 20 days of holiday? Wow, that's not too shabby."

  • So, in this example, 20 days of holiday is not unfair.

  • So, therefore, it's not too shabby.

  • A million pounds a month is also not too shabby.

  • Another example might be if you have just moved into a new home and this place is nice and clean.

  • If you were giving someone a tour, if you're showing someone around, they might say, "Okay, yeah, it's not too shabby."

  • So, in this case, it's not in bad condition.

  • It's not too shabby.

  • It's pretty good.

  • The next expression is "easier said than done."

  • Easier said than done.

  • So, this is one of those idioms that has a very literal meaning.

  • Let me just ask you a question, all right?

  • So, what do you think is easier to do?

  • Number one, say the words, I'm going to the moon.

  • Or number two, actually going to the moon.

  • So, leaving your house, finding a rocket, persuading someone to give you a lift to the moon and successfully get to the moon whilst, you know, not dying.

  • Obviously, it's a lot easier just to say that you are going to the moon than to actually go there.

  • So, we use this expression, it's easier said than done, to say that while something may sound very straightforward or simple in theory;

  • in reality, it's going to be a lot more difficult and complicated to actually do that thing.

  • Right, I know that example was a little bit silly.

  • I know that sounds so obvious, but this is genuinely an everyday expression.

  • So, let me give you a couple of realistic examples.

  • "Listen, mate, if you're struggling for money, why don't you just ask your boss for a raise?"

  • "Well, yeah, but you know, that's easier said than done."

  • "All right, mate, are you excited for your trip to Africa then?"

  • "Yeah, I am, of course, but I just hope that I don't get bit by any mosquitoes."

  • "Although, that might be easier said than done."

  • So, the next time you are talking about something that sounds very simple and straightforward in theory, but in reality, you know, it's going to be a lot more complicated than that, why not say it's easier said than done?

  • Okay, so the final expression from today's video is...

  • Well, it's not actually that.

  • It's, "I don't have a clue."

  • I don't have a clue.

  • So, the expression is, I don't have a clue.

  • And if you don't have a clue, it just means that you don't have any knowledge about something.

  • So, perhaps you have just forgotten what you knew about it, or maybe you never knew about it in the first place.

  • So, a clue is just a piece of information.

  • And this word is normally used when people are investigating a crime.

  • They might say, "Oh, I've got a clue about this big murder case."

  • However, that isn't really that relevant to this expression.

  • Anyway, if you don't have a clue, it just means you have no information about it whatsoever.

  • This expression is very commonly used.

  • So, let me give you some examples.

  • "All right, mate, I don't suppose you've seen my favorite mug, have you? It's the one with the birds on it."

  • "I don't have a clue where it is."

  • "Um, no, no idea, mate. Sorry."

  • "What are you going to do about your mug then?"

  • "I don't have a clue, mate."

  • "There's not much I can do, really."

  • So, some other examples might be, "I don't have a clue who to vote for."

  • "Honestly... I did not have a clue who that was."

  • "Do you know who invented the airplane?" "Mate, I don't have a clue."

  • "My car was just broken down and honestly, I don't have a clue how to fix it."

  • So, this is just an informal way of saying, I have no idea.

  • All right, guys, well, we seem to be in the outro.

  • So, I wanted to say thank you so much for watching today's video.

  • As mentioned, everything we covered today will be included in a free PDF.

  • The link is in the top comment.

  • You don't need to sign up to anything or enter your email address.

  • Just hit the link and press download.

  • All I ask in return is that if you did enjoy today's video, I don't know, why not consider liking the video, subscribing to the channel and maybe commenting down below.

  • I know those all sound like quite small things, but honestly, they make such a big difference.

  • I have done a few of these everyday expression videos before.

  • So