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  • Hey everyone, welcome to the R bootcamp.

  • Welcome to the R bootcamp.

  • This bootcamp is for you if you struggle with pronouncing the R in English, and, or you struggle with using it freely when speaking, even though you know how to make it, it's just not there for you when speaking.

  • If you do this exercise every single day, 10 minutes a day, you will see how easier it is for you to start using the R when speaking.

  • First of all, let's understand what you need to do to get to the R sound.

  • For the R, the tongue pulls back the sides of the tongue, push against the sides of the upper teeth.

  • Rrrr.

  • The tongue is curved in the middle of the mouth.

  • It's like just standing there with power.

  • And the tip of the tongue is not touching anything.

  • It can point up, up and back, forward, down.

  • Honestly, it doesn't matter.

  • What matters is that the sides of the tongue push against the sides of the upper teeth, and there is tension in the back.

  • Rrrr.

  • One more thing is that your lips need to round.

  • Rrrr.

  • You want to think of it like a growling dog.

  • Rrrr.

  • Or a pirate.

  • Rrrr.

  • Rrrr.

  • Now it doesn't matter if the R is at the beginning or at the end.

  • Let's get used to this position.

  • Rrrr.

  • A lot of times it feels weird, and this is why you're not using it when speaking.

  • So you've got to get comfortable with that new position and new sound.

  • Again.

  • Rrrr.

  • Good.

  • Let's begin with R-R-R-R-R.

  • Let's do a few of those.

  • R-R-R-R-R.

  • What we're going to do is we're going to use the R before and after different vowel sounds to get used to saying and hearing the sound.

  • R-R-R-R-R.

  • Now A.

  • Rey-rey-rey-rey-rey.

  • Now I.

  • Rye-rye-rye-rye-rye.

  • Round your lips.

  • Now ro-ro-ro-ro-ro.

  • Good.

  • Now roy.

  • Like the name.

  • Roy.

  • Drop your jaw.

  • Roy.

  • Keep the tongue down after you're done with the R.

  • Rrrroy.

  • Roy-roy-roy-roy-roy.

  • Good.

  • Ow.

  • Row-row-row-row-row-row.

  • One more time.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • Ruh-ruh-rye.

  • Ruh-ruh-ro.

  • Ruh-ruh-roy.

  • Ruh-ruh-row.

  • Now let's try a few more vowels.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • As in red.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • I'm deliberately not using the R in words just yet.

  • I want you to get comfortable with saying that new sound, or weird sound, or R sound, whatever you want to call it, before and after different vowel sounds.

  • Get comfortable with it.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • Ruh-ruh-ray.

  • Ruh-ruh-ree.

  • Ruh-ruh-ree.

  • Ruh-ruh-ree.

  • Ruh-ruh-ree.

  • Round your lips.

  • Ruh-ruh-ra.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • As in cat.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Ruh-ruh-ruh.

  • Ruh-ruh-ruh.

  • Ruh-ruh-ruh.

  • Ruh-ruh-ruh.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Ruh-ruh-raa.

  • Very good.

  • Now, let's move on to comparing R's and W's.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Make sure that they're different.

  • Ruh, different quality.

  • Wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Now let's compare R's and L's.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • For the L, the tongue touches the upper palate.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • For the R, it doesn't.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Again, R-W.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • Ruh-wuh.

  • R-L.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Ruh-luh.

  • Very good.

  • Now, let's try a few words where the R appears after a vowel.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Keep your jaw open and make sure that the tongue doesn't go up for the R as you're pronouncing the vowel at the beginning.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Now, air, as in dare.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • And again, don't try to go into words just yet.

  • It's really important to sit with just R's and vowels before and after.

  • Get comfortable with the sound.

  • And the drills, that's what matters.

  • That's what develops the muscle memory.

  • Okay?

  • That's how you get comfortable with the sound and start using it spontaneously.

  • Again.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Push the lips just a bit at the end.

  • Aar.

  • Aar.

  • Now, ear.

  • Ear.

  • E-E.

  • E as in see.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Only at the end, there's the R.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Ear.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Not er, er, er, but or, as in for.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Or.

  • Now, let's practice clusters, like cry.

  • Cry.

  • We're holding out the R.

  • C-r-r-y.

  • C-r-r-y.

  • B-r-r-y.

  • B-r-r-y.

  • Don't try to find meaning in the words, I'm just making sounds.

  • B-r-r-y.

  • B-r-r-y.

  • F-r-r-y.

  • F-r-r-y.

  • F-r-r-y.