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  • Okay, it's time to work on our listening and comprehension.

  • I'm going to play you a conversation that was unscripted, unplanned

  • and is largely unedited.

  • Then I will go back and revisit some of the vocabulary that you may not

  • have been familiar with, but by the end of this lesson, you will be.

  • If you would like the cheat sheet that goes along with this lesson,

  • which includes the transcript of the conversation along with vocabulary that

  • I point out, and some little exercises to help you to remember the vocabulary,

  • then all you need to do is click on the link below and join my mailing list and

  • I'll send the cheat sheet straight to you.

  • Now, without further ado, let's listen.

  • "Were you a teacher's pet back at school?

  • Um, for some of them, no, well, no.

  • No.

  • No.

  • What about you?

  • Yes, in English I was definitely the teacher's pet and in like PE I

  • was the golden girl because I did all the clubs and took part in every

  • extracurricular activity that was going.

  • I was generally a good girl, not a naughty girl.

  • It's a funny word, isn't it?

  • Naughty, because we use it to mean cheeky a lot.

  • For children, I don't think we, I think naughty just means, um...

  • Badly...

  • ...like badly behaved.

  • I think adults being naughty is different to being a criminal.

  • Yes, yes.

  • Whereas...

  • Because if you break the rules at school, you're a naughty boy or

  • you're a naughty girl, but if you're a grown-up and you call someone a

  • naughty girl, then it's got almost like a, it's like hanky panky, isn't it?

  • Yeah.

  • It's like, um...

  • Sexual connotations.

  • Sexual connotations.

  • So, as a child, I wasn't a naughty girl, but I did hang around with...

  • ...as an adult!?

  • I did hang around with some of the naughty kids.

  • There was one time when I started a new school and I was trying to hang out with

  • a cool crowd and they were all behind the bikeshed having a sneaky ciggy,

  • but I was being the lookout for them.

  • I was trying to help them out because I wanted to get in with them and so I

  • was looking out for them and then one of the girls asked me to hold one of their

  • cigarettes for a moment and the moment I took the cigarette in hand was the moment

  • like the head of department or someone quite senior in the teaching staff walked

  • around the corner and literally caught me red-handed even though it wasn't my

  • cigarette and of course, I protested.

  • I was like,

  • "It's not mine, it's not mine..."

  • But I had it in my hand.

  • Do you think your friends saw the teacher coming?

  • Maybe.

  • Maybe they were just like setting me up for a fall.

  • But even in those circumstances, like, I wasn't the kind of person

  • who would dob other people in.

  • I was a good girl but I kept my mouth shut when I needed to.

  • I used to hate the word dobbing.

  • Did you?

  • Yeah as a kid it was like, I always thought it was something

  • that people got off Neighbours...

  • Right.

  • ...or, um, Home and Away, saying,

  • "You're gonna be dobbing me in."

  • Well what word would you use?

  • Like to rat, to rat someone out or?

  • I think,...

  • as when you were younger you just say like 'telling the teacher'

  • or something, but then...

  • "I'm telling!"

  • Yeah.

  • "I'm telling on you!"

  • Yeah, be like you telling or whatever and then I think when you're a bit older like,

  • "You're gonna grass me up."

  • Oh, 'grass up'.

  • Yeah, absolutely.

  • Yeah, we used that one a lot when I was a kid.

  • "Don't grass me up."

  • I was a goody two shoes, actually.

  • I don't remember ever getting a detention or...

  • You really were a goody two shoes.

  • Yeah, I really was.

  • I really was.

  • I have no idea how many detentions I got.

  • Really?

  • Oh, so you were a bit of a naughty boy.

  • Yeah, I got in a few fights and all this kind of stuff, you know, boys

  • trying to find their place in like the hierarchy of the, of the year.

  • And there was 150 kids in my year, so there was a lot of people

  • finding their places and things.

  • And then when you got a bit older, like, those sorts of things mostly disappeared.

  • I wasn't very good at doing my homework.

  • I was a bit bored, I think, for the most part.

  • So you'd just always test the limits.

  • You know, I didn't, I didn't mind saying things that maybe were a bit on the edge.

  • Right.

  • Getting me in a bit of trouble with the teachers and things.

  • You weren't expelled, were you?

  • No, I was never expelled.

  • I think you've got to be horrible to be expelled.

  • I was suspended, maybe three times.

  • You were suspended three times?

  • I think so, yeah.

  • What on earth did you do to get suspended for a whole week?

  • Well..."

  • Were you a teacher's pet back at school?

  • Teacher's pet describes the student who is the teacher's favourite student.

  • So they might get a special treatment, or the teacher may just behave in a more kind

  • and friendly way towards that student.

  • The teacher's pet.

  • In like PE I was the golden girl.

  • Here I mentioned being the golden girl in PE.

  • PE stands for physical education.

  • It's the lessons that involve sports and being physical that we do at

  • school and being a golden girl is like being a very well-behaved and

  • well-liked girl, a golden girl.

  • But if you're a grown-up and you call someone a naughty girl, then it's got

  • almost like a, it's like hanky panky.

  • Hanky panky.

  • This kind of fun slightly naughty phrase refers to behaving in a very

  • intimate and sexual way with somebody else the act of hanky panky could

  • literally replace the word sex.

  • So,

  • "Did you have hanky panky last night?"

  • It's sex, basically.

  • A bit of hanky panky.

  • But hanky panky can also refer to just the acts that are sexual

  • that aren't necessarily sex.

  • So a bit of, a bit of tickling and rolling around.

  • Hanky panky.

  • And they were all behind the bike shed having a sneaky ciggy, but

  • I was being the lookout for them.

  • I was trying to help them out because I wanted to get in with them.

  • Here, I used the phrase ciggy, meaning cigarette.

  • So you might hear different, uh, like slang terms like

  • sig, fag, ciggy, cigarette.

  • I use the word ciggy just off the cuff.

  • I also said lookout.

  • To be a lookout is to be the person who stands guard while something is happening,

  • watching to make sure that no one is coming or that no one can see and if

  • someone is coming the lookout is supposed to tell whoever is doing the deed,

  • "Someone's coming quick."

  • Now, normally there'd be a lookout if a gang were committing a crime like

  • robbing a bank there'd be someone on lookout at the front or I always think

  • of meerkats when I think of a lookout because meerkats will spend their

  • time doing what they're doing but one meerkat will have the job of being the

  • lookout and he stands up tall and he looks to the sky to look for predators.

  • And if there's a predator, he will warn the others and they'll all

  • quickly scurry away into safety.

  • I also said I wanted to get in with the group, to get in with them.

  • To get in with a group of people is to become one of them.

  • So be liked by a group of friends so that they want you to be in their group.

  • They like talking to you, they invite you to do the things that

  • they're doing to get in with them.

  • And literally caught me red-handed even though it wasn't my cigarette.

  • I was caught red-handed.

  • To be caught red-handed is an idiom that describes being caught or found in the act

  • of doing something you shouldn't be doing.

  • So if I'm in my kitchen, no one's around, and there's a big slice

  • of cake in the fridge that I'm not supposed to eat, because it belongs

  • to someone else or maybe I'm on a diet and then I think no one's looking,

  • "Chomp chomp!"

  • And I've got chocolate all over my face and someone walks in as I'm just

  • licking my fingers, but I still have chocolate on my face Then I've just been

  • caught red-handed, caught in the act.

  • Maybe they were just like setting me up for a fall.

  • To set someone up for a fall is to prepare someone to then allow them to fail.

  • Just like you would set up dominoes, and as soon as you finish setting

  • up your dominoes, you knock them down, and they all fall down.

  • In some circumstances, people will set other people up for a fall.

  • So they'll put them in a situation where they know they will fail.

  • It's not pleasant, but it happens.