Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello.

  • My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, I am going to teach you about expressions you

  • can use to wish someone luck.

  • So let me give you examples of a situation where you might need to wish somebody good

  • luck.

  • I have here my friend Ken.

  • Ken is taking a test.

  • What test is Ken taking?

  • He's taking the IELTS, so he is really nervous.

  • So what I would like to do is I would like to wish Ken good luck for his test.

  • I also have a friend, Rodrigo.

  • Rodrigo has a job interview on Monday.

  • He also is really nervous, so what I'd like to do is I'd like to say something to him

  • to make him feel better and to show him I support him.

  • I also have a friend, Alice.

  • Alice has a big presentation.

  • She is terrified.

  • So when I speak to Alice, I want to say something to her to make her feel better about her presentation.

  • So what can we say to these people?

  • How can we wish them luck?

  • Well, you are about to find out.

  • Okay, so here is a very funny but common expression in English.

  • We often tell people, "Break a leg."

  • So that's really weird, "Break a leg."

  • When we tell someone, "Break a leg," we don't actually want them to get hurt.

  • What we are really saying is good luck.

  • So we say, "Break a leg" before someone performs, maybe you might have a child who is in a play,

  • and you might say, "Oh, break a leg."

  • Or maybe there is somebody doing a job interview, you might say, "Break a leg."

  • It just means good luck.

  • This is a very common expression nowadays.

  • You got this.

  • So whenever someone is nervous because they have to do something like a test, a presentation,

  • maybe a job interview, their friends usually say to them, "You got this.

  • You got this."

  • It just means, "I know you will do well.

  • I believe in you.

  • You got this."

  • When I was a student, I remember there was one man in the class, Richard, who would always

  • go around and tell each person before a test, he would always say, "You got this."

  • And it always made us feel a lot better.

  • So this is a great thing to tell people to encourage them.

  • Okay, this next expression is a little bit like the first one.

  • It sounds really strange.

  • The expression is, "Knock 'em dead.

  • Knock 'em dead."

  • What does that mean?

  • Do we want someone to die?

  • No.

  • But when we say, "Knock 'em dead", it means do well.

  • Okay, so you're telling somebody you want them to do well.

  • Maybe you want them to do well at a job interview.

  • You might say, "Knock 'em dead."

  • So you'll notice this weird word here, "em".

  • What does "em" mean?

  • Well, "em" with this apostrophe actually stands for "them".

  • So when we say, "Knock them dead", we actually kind of say it in a slang way.

  • So it actually becomes, "Knock 'em dead.

  • Knock 'em dead."

  • It means do well.

  • Before we look at the next expressions, I also wanted to bring up one thing about the

  • pronunciation of the word "break".

  • You might see here an "e" and an "a".

  • Usually in English, when we see "e" and "a" together, it makes an "e" sound.

  • In this word, it's different.

  • We actually pronounce this more like an "a".

  • So it sounds more like "break".

  • So it's not an "e" sound, it's an "a" sound, "break a leg".

  • Okay, now let's look at some other common expressions we can use to wish somebody luck.

  • Okay, the next expression is very common.

  • What we can say is, "Fingers crossed."

  • We can also do hand gestures with this, we can actually cross our fingers, okay?

  • So what does it mean when we say, "Fingers crossed"?

  • Well, when we say, "Fingers crossed", it means I hope you get the result you want, or I hope

  • something good will happen.

  • So for example, my sister is selling her house.

  • I hope she gets a good price for her house, so I will say, "Oh, fingers crossed.

  • I hope you sell your house.

  • Fingers crossed."

  • Or maybe if you have a friend who is, you know, doing a test, you might say, "Fingers

  • crossed.

  • I hope you do well."

  • So it's just a superstition that we cross our fingers in order to bring luck to us and

  • our friends.

  • And I want you to just pay attention to the pronunciation of this expression.

  • The "s" actually has a "z" sound, so it sounds like "fingers", so it has that "z" sound to

  • it.

  • And "crossed" ends in "ed", but the way we pronounce "ed" in this case is like a "t"

  • sound.

  • So we do not say, "Fingers cross-ed", we say, "Fingers crossed.

  • Fingers crossed."

  • Now, if we cross our finger or fingers and we put it behind our back, that has a different

  • meaning.

  • "Fingers crossed behind the back" means we are lying about something, okay?

  • So if I said, "I will not watch Netflix tonight", I'm lying.

  • I am totally going to watch Netflix tonight, okay?

  • So it has that other meaning as well.

  • Okay, here's another expression you can tell somebody to tell them that you support them

  • and that you think they will do well on something.

  • You can say, "You'll blow them away."

  • "Blow them away" means, you know, you're going to impress somebody.

  • So for example, if you have a job interview, if you blow someone away, it means you impress

  • them at your job interview.

  • And so, who is this "them"?

  • "Them" can refer to many different people.

  • It can be an organization, it can be a boss, it can be a co-worker, whoever you are trying

  • to impress with something, maybe it's even an audience, "blow them away" means, you know,

  • impress someone or you will impress someone with what you are going to do.

  • Okay, this next example, I often write in cards, you know, when somebody retires or

  • maybe someone is graduating from school, sometimes, you know, especially at work, there's a tradition

  • where everyone writes a message in a greeting card.

  • So if Bob is retiring, in his card, I might actually write, "Best of luck, Bob."

  • This means good luck with your life or I wish you luck.

  • So we often write "best of luck".

  • It's a great expression to use both in speech or in conversation, but also in writing.

  • Anytime you want to wish someone luck, you can write "best of luck", and the "to you"

  • is optional.

  • Okay?

  • So you can just say "best of luck" or you can say "best of luck to you", it's your choice.

  • This next expression is different from the other expressions.

  • The other expressions were expressions we say to our friends or our family or our co-workers,

  • but what if you are the person that needs the luck?

  • You are the one taking the test or you are the one doing the presentation or the job

  • interview.

  • So what can you say if it's you and you want luck?

  • Well, anytime I need luck, I say to different people, "Please wish me luck.

  • Wish me luck.

  • Wish me luck.

  • I have my driving license test.

  • Wish me luck.

  • I have the IELTS.

  • Wish me luck.

  • I have a job interview tomorrow."

  • So this just means you want a person to tell you good luck.

  • I am a very superstitious person, so I always ask people to wish me luck.

  • So now let's look at a couple more expressions that we use when we are talking about luck

  • and wishing others luck.

  • Okay.

  • So you or your friend have finished what you needed to do.

  • So maybe you finished your test or your friend has finished their interview or presentation

  • or project or meeting.

  • Whatever the reason you wish someone luck or you asked for luck, what happens now, after?

  • Well, usually when we see the person next, we will ask them a question.

  • We might ask them, "How did it go?"

  • What do we mean by "it"?

  • Well, "it" could be the test, the interview, the presentation, whatever the reason you're

  • wishing someone luck is the "it".

  • "How did it go?

  • How was the performance?

  • What was the result?

  • Did it go okay?

  • Did you do well?"

  • So these are the kinds of questions you might ask.

  • And hopefully, this is how your friend or you will respond.

  • "Nailed it."

  • "Nailed it" means I did really well.

  • "How was your test?"

  • Nailed it.

  • "How was your presentation?"

  • I nailed it.

  • So it's an easy way to say I did really well.

  • It's the same with the word "killed".

  • You might have heard the word "killed" in a very negative way, but we also have a positive

  • meaning in slang.

  • When we say, "I killed it", it means I did really, really good on something.

  • I'll give you an example.

  • When I took my driving test to learn how to become a driver, I killed my test.

  • This means I did really well on my test.

  • So this is kind of the slang way to say this, but maybe you don't like to use slang, maybe

  • you just want more of a regular, everyday way to say this, you might just say, "Oh,