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  • Well this year we bought Japanese Osechi to try on New Years' Day

  • Whoa!

  • Actually we bought one and our neighbors also brought one which they made

  • So we have two to try

  • So here we gofirst time!

  • [Life in Japan Theme Song]

  • New Years in Japan is a big deal, perhaps their most important holiday of all.

  • The Reutter kids are sure excited too, because it means they will soon be enjoying winter break.

  • Bye!

  • The last day of school is always an exciting time, oh boy!

  • Leading up to New Years, the Japanese clean their houses in order to have a special time with family and friends.

  • And this year we are incorporating even more Japanese traditions into our New Years' celebrations,

  • and it all starts with a very important visit.

  • So Christmas is done, it was amazing!

  • Just our best Christmas ever at Paz!

  • And now we're getting ready for a super duper special visit,

  • Something that hasn't happened in over three years!

  • What's happening Sarah?!

  • Vovó (Grandma) and Vovô (Grandpa) are going to come!

  • Wow girlfriend! Look at this house here, huh?

  • I know, it looks clean, doesn't it?

  • It goes! It looks all ready for your parents to come!

  • Ruth's parents are visiting us from Brazil, so we are going to the airport to pick them up.

  • We have cleared our schedule as much as possible in order to enjoy this special time with them,

  • and it turns out that this is exactly what the Japanese do this time of year.

  • Ok, we have Vovô (Grandpa) and Vovó (Grandma) with us!

  • Yes! Yea!

  • They just did the long long flight that we did earlier this year.

  • With most people heading to their hometowns to be with family, the traffic gets super crazy near the end of the year.

  • Everyone seems to be anxious to make it to their holiday destinations.

  • A return trip from the airport that usually takes around 50 minutes took us an hour and half to do.

  • That's holiday traffic for you,

  • but it's OK, because to us this is the beginning of our New Years' break!

  • The kids wasted no time welcoming Vovó and Vovô to the house,

  • immediately asking to play a game under our Japanese Kotatsu table.

  • Aw, Rumikub with Vovó and Vovô!

  • The holidays were officially underway.

  • Before trying our traditional Japanese New Years' Food, we were treated to a visit to a nearby flower park.

  • The good thing going with Vovô is?

  • He pays!

  • The very end of the year may not be the best time to visit a flower park,

  • but we still had a lot of fun seeing the shows,

  • seeing the otters

  • Otters!

  • What did you get, Sarah?

  • Otter

  • An otter?

  • Aww, look at that otter!

  • not to mention the tropical fish

  • Wow!

  • and of course, exploring the gardens.

  • The best part of Japanese New Years' is the time spent together with family and friends.

  • Look at the crew coming!

  • But now we're about to try a true Japanese New Year's tradition, eating the New Year's meal called Osechi.

  • This food was originally prepared before New Years so that no cooking was required the first couple of days of the New Year.

  • It was originally simple vegetables and soy sauce, but developed into much more elaborate offerings.

  • It has a tradition all its own and we're excited to give it a try.

  • And this one, look! It comes with thisoh!

  • Oh, I think this is the little cloth that you're supposed to... that you can tie it up in.

  • It's Pokemon.

  • Yea!

  • Look!

  • Here's the case.

  • Oh! It actually comes with Pokemon Chopsticks.

  • Jetlag hit Vovô pretty hard, but Vovó was ready to try it with us!

  • It's in a Pokemon ball!

  • Whoa! Look at this!

  • How cool!

  • Wha!!!

  • Oh, it's doubled!

  • Oh my goodness, that is wild!

  • I'm not eating this!

  • Interesting... Look at how cute.

  • Do you have any idea what some of these are, Ruth?

  • That looks like egg, Um hum.

  • Matcha cake...

  • Shrimp... That looks like squid in there.

  • And look at that fish!

  • Look at those fish!

  • This looks like that "Temaki" something-or-other...

  • Is it yummy?

  • Made with egg.

  • Mochi balls, those look good.

  • Wait- oh yes! There's a carrot here, yes I can eat!

  • Is it a carrot? Uh huh.

  • Oh, look at the inside of this!

  • It is? Is it good? Uh huh.

  • These are in our misoshiro (soup) at school.

  • Oh, you have those in your misoshiro soup at school?

  • Yep. And that.

  • And that too? Um, it's good.

  • We started diving in, even though we had no idea what we were doing!

  • Umm, this is very good.

  • Ahh, this looks like Biwa!

  • What is Biwa?

  • Or is it Tomato?

  • It's like a mini-mini orange.

  • Oh my!

  • What do you keep eating there that you like so much?

  • You don't know?

  • But it sure is good.

  • New Years, for in Japan, is kind of like what Thanksgiving is in the States,

  • Where people all go back to their hometowns and they have the traditional foods that they eat.

  • This is sweet-potato-something.

  • Sweet potato? Oh! It's delicious.

  • Here in Japan, these are the traditional foods.

  • So if we're messing it up, or we're calling it by the wrong name,

  • Or we're eating it wrong, please be nice to us.

  • Put it in the comments, what we were supposed to do, and we can learn from it.

  • It's like a hamburger.

  • Oh!

  • I want some!

  • Mmm!

  • Oh, is it good? Yea!

  • Does the Sara-bara like it?

  • I do.

  • You do too?

  • Look, it's a Pikachu.

  • Pikachu!

  • Right as you put it in your mouth the flavor goes byah!!

  • Very good.

  • Umm, that's a sausage... with cheese in the middle.

  • Did everyone have a favorite at all?

  • This...

  • I'm going to eat another one.

  • You're going to eat another one! You've had a bunch of these so far.

  • Carrot!

  • Your favorite was the carrot?

  • Umm, I really like this.

  • Whatever this is.

  • Matcha cake. It's delicious.

  • I love this root.

  • The root. Um.

  • I like the hamburgers.

  • Did you have a favorite?

  • Um, not yet.

  • You haven't had it yet, you don't know.

  • I'm changing my mind, this is my favorite.

  • She had some of the matcha cake.

  • Here we go! Oh my!

  • Vovó's going to have some shrimp!

  • You're going to have to peel it, mom.

  • You have to eat it with your hands, right?

  • I mean, I don't know how to do this. Yea sure.

  • Oh, I have no idea either.

  • So if it's OK, I'm going to try it the way I would do it.

  • [Gasps]

  • It squirted me!

  • Mama chan is squirtin!

  • It peed!

  • Delicious! I'm going away!

  • Um, I love it!

  • Well, we could go and buy you some...I mean there's one more shrimp, but...

  • That is good shrimp.

  • OK Daddy, you need to try one.

  • Well there's no more.

  • I am not a shrimp person.

  • Mmm, I love shrimp.

  • Yea, Momma-chan loves shrimp, so does Vovó-chan

  • I want Daddy to try the fish with the eyeballs in it.

  • You do, huh?

  • We eat those at school! Is that what you want me to try, huh?

  • You eat that at school?!

  • Well, they give them the tiny version.

  • I'll try one.

  • Watch, Vovó is going to try one.

  • Alright!

  • It's curry. It's not curry.

  • Mmm. It's a fish with eyeballs.

  • It's good.

  • Should Mommy eat one?

  • Is it a sardine?

  • It's probably like a... It's like a little sardine, yea.

  • Tough little thing. Tough, but it's good, not bad.