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  • Steve Jobs was born on 24th February 1955 in  San Francisco California. His birth parents  

  • had to give up Steve due to being too young at  the time and not wanting to get married. Having  

  • a child out of wedlock had a strong stigma in the  50's, so Steve was adopted by Paul and Clara Jobs

  • In 1961 the family moved to Mountain ViewCalifornia. This area, just south of Palo  

  • Alto, California, was becoming the hub for  electronics such as radios, televisions,  

  • stereos, and computers. At that time people  started to refer to the area as "Silicon Valley." 

  • Paul Jobs was a machinist  and fixed cars as a hobby.  

  • Jobs remembers his father as being  very skilled at working with his hands.  

  • Paul built a workbench in his garage for his  son to "pass along his love of mechanics”. 

  • Steve often found it difficult in making  friends his own age and struggled to function  

  • in a traditional classroom. He resisted authority  figures, frequently misbehaved and was suspended a  

  • few times. Jobs later said himself he waspretty  bored in school and had turned into a little  

  • terror..” He regularly played pranks on others  at Monta Loma Elementary school in Mountain View

  • Although Jobs credited his fourth  grade teacher with turning him around:  

  • "It took her about a month to get hip to my  situation. She bribed me into learning. She would  

  • say, 'I really want you to finish this workbook.  I'll give you five bucks if you finish it.'  

  • That kindled a passion in me for learning! I  learned more that year than I think I learned in  

  • any other year in school. They wanted me to skip  the next two years in grade school and go straight  

  • to junior high to learn a foreign language, but  my parents very wisely wouldn't let it happen.” 

  • Jobs did skip the fifth grade and transferred  to the 6th grade at Crittenden Middle  

  • School in Mountain View. However, this  transition led to Jobs being bullied,  

  • he then gave his parents an ultimatum, take him  out of Crittenden or he would drop out of school.  

  • His parents used all their savings in 1967 to  buy a new house which would allow Jobs to change  

  • schools. Their new house on Crist Drive in  Los Altos, California would later become a  

  • key figure in Apple's history. Whilst Jobs  started studying at Cupertino Junior High

  • A fellow electronics hobbyist, Bill Fernandezfrom Cupertino Junior High, became his first  

  • friend. Fernandez later commented that "for some  reason the kids in the eighth grade didn't like  

  • Steve because they thought he was odd. I was  one of his few friends." Fernandez eventually  

  • introduced Jobs to electronics whiz Steve Wozniakwho lived across the street from Fernandez

  • As a child, Jobs preferred doing things by  himself. He swam competitively but was not  

  • interested in team sports or other group  activities. He spent a lot of time working  

  • in the garage workshop of a neighbour who worked  at Hewlett-Packard, an electronics manufacturer

  • Jobs also enrolled in the Hewlett-Packard Explorer  Club where he saw engineers demonstrate new  

  • products, and he saw his first computer at the age  of twelve. He was impressed and knew immediately  

  • that he wanted to work with computers. While in high school Jobs attended lectures  

  • at the Hewlett-Packard plant. On one occasion  he boldly asked William Hewlett, the president,  

  • for some parts he needed to complete for  a class project. Hewlett was impressed,  

  • he gave Jobs the parts and offered himsummer internship at Hewlett-Packard. Jobs said  

  • He didn't know me at all, but he ended  up giving me some parts and he got me a  

  • job that summer working at Hewlett-Packard on  the line, assembling frequency counters...well,  

  • assembling may be too strong. I was putting  in screws. It didn't matter; I was in heaven.” 

  • The location of the Los Altos home meant that  Jobs would be able to attend nearby Homestead High  

  • School, which had strong ties to Silicon ValleyHe began his first year there in late 1968.  

  • During mid-1970, Steve went through a period of  change, he said "I got stoned for the first time;  

  • I discovered ShakespeareDylan Thomas, and all  that classic stuff. I read Moby Dick and went back  

  • as a junior taking creative writing classes."  From that point, Jobs developed two different  

  • circles of friends, those involved in electronics  and engineering and those interested in art and  

  • literature. These dual interests were particularly  reflected during Jobs's senior year as his best  

  • friends were Wozniak and his first girlfriendthe artistic Homestead junior Chrisann Brennan

  • He was described by a Homestead classmate as  "kind of a brain and kind of a hippie ... but  

  • he never fit into either group. He was smart  enough to be a nerd, but wasn't nerdy. And he  

  • was too intellectual for the hippies, who just  wanted to get wasted all the time. He was kind  

  • of an outsider. In high school everything  revolved around what group you were in.  

  • and if you weren't in a carefully defined groupyou weren't anybody. He was an individual,  

  • in a world where individuality was suspect."  Paul and Clara Jobs had made a pledge when they  

  • adopted Steve that they would send him  to college. So they had worked hard and  

  • saved dutifully for his college fund, which was  modest but adequate by the time he graduated.  

  • However Jobs, becoming ever more wilful mindeddid not make it easy. At first he toyed with not  

  • going to college at all. “I think I might have  headed to New York if I didn't go to college,”  

  • 

When his parents pushed him to go to college, he  responded in a passive-aggressive way. He did not  

  • consider state schools, such as Berkeley, where  Steve Wozniak was, despite that they were more  

  • affordable. Nor did he look at Stanford, just up  the road and likely to offer a scholarship. “The  

  • kids who went to Stanford, they already  knew what they wanted to do,” he said.  

  • Theyweren't really artistic. I wanted something  that was more artistic and interesting.” 

  • Instead he insisted on applying only to  Reed College, a private liberal arts school  

  • in Portland, Oregon, that was one of the most  expensive in the nationHe was visiting Steve  

  • Wozniak at Berkeley when his father called to  say an acceptance letter had arrived from Reed,  

  • he tried to talk Steve out of going thereSo did his mother. It was more than they  

  • could afford but similarly their son responded  with an ultimatum: If he couldn't go to Reed,  

  • he wouldn't go anywhere. They relented, as usual. Reed was known for its free-spirited hippie  

  • lifestyle, which combined somewhat uneasily  with its rigorous academic standardsSteve  

  • enrolled at Reed to study Physics and PhilosophyChirssan Brennan remained involved with Jobs while  

  • he was at Reed. However Steve soon decided to  drop out of Reed College. He liked being at  

  • Reed however he didn't enjoy having to attend the  required classes. Jobs continued to attend classes  

  • he enjoyed like calligraphy. During that time the  relationship between Jobs and Brennan broke down

  • In a 2005 commencement speech at Stanford  University, Jobs stated that during this period,  

  • he slept on the floor in friends' dorm  rooms, returned Coke bottles for food money,  

  • and got weekly free meals at the local Hare  Krishna temple. In that same speech,  

  • Jobs said: "If I had never dropped in on  that single calligraphy course in college,  

  • the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or  proportionally spaced fonts.” 

  • In 1972 Wozniak had designed a low-cost  digital "blue box" to generate the  

  • necessary tones to manipulate the telephone  network, allowing free long-distance calls.  

  • Jobs decided that they could make money  selling it. The two stopped making the  

  • boxes after they were nearly caught by the  policeDespite giving up on the venture,  

  • they reportedly made about $6000 selling the blue  boxes. Jobs said that if not for the blue boxes,  

  • there would have been no Apple. And that they  could take on large companies and beat them

  • In mid-1973, when Jobs was 18 he moved back  to the San Francisco area and began renting  

  • his own apartment. Brennan and Jobs relationship  was complicated by this stage. Jobs hitchhiked  

  • and worked around the West Coast and Brennan  would occasionally join him. Brennan wrote  

  • this in her dairy, "little by little, Steve andseparated. But we were never able to fully let go.  

  • We never talked about breaking up or going our  separate ways and we didn't have that conversation  

  • where one person says it's over." They continued  to grow apart, but Jobs would still seek her out,  

  • and visit her while she was working inhealth food store or as a live-in babysitter.  

  • In 1973, Steve Wozniak designed his own version of  the classic video game Pong. After finishing it,  

  • Wozniak gave the board to Jobs, who then took the  game down to Atari in Los Gatos. Atari thought  

  • that Jobs had built it and gave him a job as  a technician. 

Later Atari's co-founder said  

  • "The truth is that very few companies would hire  Steve, even today. Why? Because he was an outlier.  

  • To most potential employers, he'd just seem like  a jerk in bad clothing. Steve was difficult but  

  • valuable. He was very often the smartest guy in  the room, and he would let people know that." 

  • By early 1974, Jobs was living what Brennan  describes as a "simple life" inLos Gatos cabin,  

  • working at Atari and saving money for his  impending trip to IndiaOne of his friends  

  • had been to India and he was urging jobs  to take his spiritual journey there too.  

  • He ended up reaching the foothills of Himaya  after days of traveling by train and bus.  

  • That's where he was supposed to see Neem Karoli  Baba but by the time Jobs got there he had  

  • passed away. Despite the setback, Jobs still spent  seven months in India exploring his spirituality

  • He said, “The people in the Indian countryside  don't use their intellect like we do,  

  • they use their intuition and their intuition  is more developed than the rest of the world.  

  • Intuition is a very powerful thingmore powerful than intellect,  

  • in my opinion. That's had a big impact on my work” 

  • After staying seven months, Jobs left  India and returned to the USJobs  

  • had changed his appearance; his head was shaved  and he wore traditional Indian clothing. Over this  

  • time, Jobs experimented with psychedelics, later  calling his experimentation with LSD “a profound  

  • experience, one of the most important things in  my life. LSD shows you that there's another side  

  • to the coin, and you can't remember it when  it wears off, but you know it. It reinforced  

  • my sense of what was importantcreating  great things instead of making money,  

  • putting things back into the stream of history  and of human consciousness as much as I could.” 

  • Jobs and Brennan both became practitioners of Zen  Buddhism. Jobs was living with his parents again,  

  • in their backyard tool-shed which he had  converted into a bedroom with a sleeping bag,  

  • mat, books, a candle, and a meditation pillow. He  considered taking up monastic residence in Japan,  

  • and maintained a lifelong appreciation for  ZenJobs would later say that people around  

  • him who did not share his countercultural roots  could not fully relate to his thinking

  • Jobs then returned to Atari and was assigned  to createcircuit board for the arcade video  

  • game Breakout. According to Bushnell, Atari  offered $100 for each TTL chip that was eliminated  

  • in the machine. Jobs himself had little knowledge  of circuit board design and made a deal with  

  • Wozniak to split the fee evenly between them if  he could minimize the number of chips. Much to the  

  • amazement of Atari engineers, Wozniak reduced the  TTL chip count from 96 to 46, a design so tight  

  • that it was impossible to reproduce on an assembly  lineAccording to Wozniak, Jobs told him that  

  • Atari gave them only $700 (instead of the $5,000  paid out), and that Wozniak's share was thus $350.  

  • It was only later that Wozniak found out about  this to which he said "I cried, I cried quite  

  • a bit when I read that in a book." It was around this time that Jobs  

  • and Wozniak attended meetings of  the Homebrew Computer Club in 1975,  

  • which was a stepping stone to the development  and marketing of the first Apple computer

  • In 1976, Wozniak designed and developed  the Applecomputer and showed it to Jobs,  

  • who suggested that they sell it. JobsWozniak, and Ronald Wayne founded Apple  

  • Computer in the garage of Jobs's  Los Altos home on Crist Drive.

  • The two Steves attended the Homebrew Computer  Club together; a computer hobbyist group that  

  • gathered in California's Menlo Park from 1975.  Woz had seen his first MITS Altair there - which  

  • today looks like little more than a box of lights  and circuit boardsWozniak was inspired by MITS'  

  • build-it-yourself approach (the Altair came askit) to make something simpler for the rest of us.

  • Wozniak went on to produce the first computer  with a typewriter-like keyboard and the ability to  

  • connect to a regular TV as a screen. It was later  christened the Apple I and was the archetype of  

  • every modern computer, but Wozniak wasn't  trying to change the world with what he'd made  

  • he just wanted to show off how much he'd  managed to do with so little resources.

  • The two decided on the name "Apple" after Jobs  returned from the All One Farm commune in Oregon  

  • and told Wozniak about his time spent  in the farm's apple orchardNeighbours  

  • on Crist Drive had described Jobs as  an odd individual who would greet his  

  • clients "with his underwear hanging  out, barefoot and hippie-like."

  • Jobs approached a local computer storeThe  Byte Shop with the Apple I, who said they  

  • would be interested in the machine, but only if  it came fully assembled. The ownerPaul Terrell,  

  • went further, saying he would order 50 of the  machines and pay US $500 each on deliveryJobs  

  • then took the purchase order that he had been  given from the Byte Shop to Cramer Electronics, a  

  • national electronic parts distributor, and ordered  the components he needed to assemble the Apple I  

  • Computer. The local credit manager asked Jobs  how he was going to pay for the parts. Jobs  

  • explained about his purchase order from the Byte  Shop which was cash on delivery. Jobs persuaded