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  • Hey guys, welcome back to T.

  • C.

  • Play.

  • Today we are finally doing abroad in japan.

  • Oh my God, the cooking special.

  • You didn't know you needed nor wanted, but let's do it.

  • Let's go, what am I cooking?

  • You're making me breakfast easy.

  • Sausage, egg, bacon, mushrooms, fried bread, tomatoes, japanese bread.

  • Oh, what's that puddle of miso and what?

  • Having breakfast in Japan to fish miso rice, necessary rice.

  • That's good.

  • I like that.

  • Can you do that Easy, Easy.

  • I'm omelet king.

  • But I mean Dashi Maki time ago.

  • What's the difference between a normal quote?

  • Dashi Maki Thom was kind of tricky because you have to roll it.

  • It's a little hard to get the shape right.

  • Like you and I have trouble making a nice looking one.

  • So I think that would be a bit of a challenge.

  • But honestly if it tastes good I'll be impressed.

  • I'm not gonna worry too much about how it looks because I know it's hard.

  • At least I don't have to eat this breakfast myself.

  • Do.

  • We're both going to eat it.

  • That will encourage you to make it my lack of enthusiasm.

  • Quickly going out the window here.

  • All right, well I've had my ice coffee, nothing can stand in my way.

  • Now let's make the ultimate japanese breakfast abroad in Japan.

  • Let's go off to the store.

  • See you in half an hour.

  • Good luck.

  • Right then it's morning, it's breakfast time.

  • Let's go shopping at a on the nice local supermarket to hock it.

  • North of japan miso paste.

  • Yes, bit of Dashi fish stock.

  • Yeah.

  • Tofu.

  • Yeah, reputable brand done.

  • Fresh welcoming seaweed.

  • Yeah, chopped green onion.

  • Yes, bit of sugar as well.

  • Yeah.

  • Key to a good japanese sake.

  • Omelet is a bit of mirin, sweet sake and some Dashi, which we've already got the miso.

  • So we're pretty much on course for the ultimate breakfast.

  • Let's do it.

  • Let's go cook it.

  • All right.

  • We got the goods, we got the breakfast.

  • Now it's time to cook it.

  • Hello Cats.

  • So, we had a few items already.

  • We've got eggs in the fridge, eggs six of them also have some soy sauce and the most important ingredient of all caffeine.

  • All right.

  • What is it?

  • Yeah.

  • Now, what do we do?

  • Uh tofu, green onions, mirin, cooking some cocaine paste.

  • Fresh wakame seaweed and Dashi fish stock.

  • Perfect.

  • Do you know what you're making first?

  • Do you remember what you're making at all?

  • We're making miso soup and omelets right here, that's the perfect size for.

  • We'll put that on there and then we're right, well look at the cattle over here, look at this.

  • This fine kettle indeed can hold up to 25 liters of water.

  • We actually are gonna need this though to have the boiling water for the miso soup.

  • This is this is important.

  • This is eggs.

  • Right.

  • How many eggs does an omelet need if I've got to eat the shower's gonna eat it.

  • I'm thinking for a good number 444 eggs.

  • And then we look up how to cook japanese omelet because I have a fucking clue as luck would have it, my good friend, your scale champs japanese kitchen.

  • He's just showing how to cook an omelet.

  • The perfect japanese omelet.

  • Let's start from scratch it.

  • The main thing that will give our dust much its flavor is about 80 ml of water.

  • My achilles heel when it comes to cooking is getting the right units of measurement.

  • Very boring.

  • I'd like to be quite adventurous.

  • Put it, put it all in, stick it all and see what happens.

  • Okay, so we've got our Dashi fish stock.

  • The stuff is the essence of what gives most of japanese food has flavor and it says here 300 mL of water, 1.5 cups.

  • Put a quarter of a stick in.

  • So let's do that now.

  • 300 mL.

  • That's a That's like four of these.

  • Still.

  • Okay, how do you measure a quarter of that?

  • This is, this is a problem.

  • Right.

  • You got eight g there.

  • I've got to work out what a quarter is and stick that in normally when I cook it on, I put an egg in a bowl.

  • I beat it.

  • I put it in the pan, job done japanese omelets.

  • They are very good.

  • They have a rich kind of savory Umami flavor, but they're so bloody difficult and so time consuming.

  • If you're, if you're me anyway, that just, that's the reason I've never done it in 10 years.

  • So there we have our Dashi fish stock is probably more like that for a quarter.

  • And in the bottom.

  • I mean already that looks like that looks kind of like Dashi dashi broth on the right track when it comes to japanese food.

  • They're not very strong in flavors, like strong flavor.

  • So I like to put in more.

  • It's too much.

  • Too much now.

  • How can we remove it?

  • Can we use like osmosis or something to that?

  • Let's just put some sugar in that will cancel out the flavor of the Dashi stock, one tablespoon of sugar.

  • None of these are good at measuring.

  • That's 59 minutes.

  • One table screen.

  • That's not a tablespoon.

  • So have to be careful here, that looks like a table spin.

  • Right?

  • Don't give that cheeky mix.

  • He's had three Scott 3 edge, so I guess I'll use three.

  • So as not to screw up the quantities that I've already screwed up even further.

  • Tasty delicious eggs.

  • I hope they haven't expired.

  • We're making progress here.

  • What's next?

  • Yeah, this is the key difference right between japanese omelet and just a normal western on that.

  • It's a bit runny because of the Dashi stock that goes in there.

  • But that looks pretty good to me.

  • I think we've got the right quantities.

  • Yes.

  • Alright, so we're gonna spice things up a bit.

  • We're gonna go extra mile.

  • Just like I always do and put half a teaspoon of soy sauce and half a teaspoon of Miriam Miriam is kind of like sweet cooking sucker.

  • You've actually got to be over 18 to buy this as I discovered today at the supermarket.

  • I didn't know that until I bought it and got my I.

  • D.

  • Checks.

  • So there's a tiny bit of mirror and a teaspoon of soy sauce to be honest, this looks pretty good.

  • I'm quite happy with this so far.

  • We're not out of the woods yet, but actually cook the damn thing and because I've never cooked a japanese omelet, I'm quite worried about getting it right.

  • If you ever watched a video, they do a very good job of like shuffling the pan and flipping the egg and the omelet constantly over and over.

  • I'm not going to do that in any way, shape or form.

  • Sorry, we're gonna make our missing now.

  • We need some water.

  • So let's take some water from here.

  • Nice boiling water already.

  • There's your water, let me say so you can put that on the pan on a very low heat.

  • That's so simple.

  • Got our miso paste here.

  • That thick miso paste with dashi already in it.

  • So we've got the dashi fish stock from earlier here.

  • But because I've already got it in the miso paste.

  • Just let that sit on the side when it comes to miss.

  • So obviously you get to decide how much how fit you want it.

  • Let's let's start with about a teaspoon, change it up more and less to look like that.

  • Get that cheeky steam just a little bit Jillian's camera that's not breaking up.

  • We came out of the kettle like piping hot boiling.

  • Got some seaweed as well, that's a lot of seaweed, jesus christ see a lesser chef would have got simple boring, like not fresh seaweed.

  • I've got this nice fresh locally sauce, seaweed, that's a lot of seaweed.

  • Let's cut, wow.

  • There you go.

  • Obviously I wouldn't normally recommend doing this, but she should have cut that out before I put it in.

  • This is what happens when you use premium ingredients, right?

  • Makes people just have the dried nori seaweed and then stick that in already cut.

  • Already sliced because I've got this fresh, locally sourced seaweed, fishermen literally come back from the beach this morning with this, I've had to do it with scissors.

  • So the price you paid for fresh ingredients and I don't want to put this in just yet.

  • I'm gonna put this in the last minute because I don't want the tofu to cook too long in the soup, but there we go.

  • We have very, very quickly run out of kitchen space here for everything.

  • Don't get a japanese apartment.

  • That's the first step of cooking actual kitchen, no matter how much water I put in this, it just tastes like sea water.

  • It's so strong.

  • We did get the miso soup that had the dashi fish stock in it which is very salty into itself.

  • So yeah, lesson learned.