Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - Telephoto lenses with a 100 times zoom,

  • macro shots on the ultra wide,

  • portrait modes using AI Stereo Depth Maps,

  • and cinematic video in 4K.

  • The cameras on our phones have gotten incredibly advanced

  • and full of features.

  • So I decided there was no better way to test these cameras

  • than to take a thousand photos with each of them.

  • We're gonna be focusing on three cameras this year.

  • The iPhone 14 Pro, the Pixel 7 Pro,

  • and the stylist touting Galaxy S22 Ultra.

  • This is the thousand photo smartphone camera shootout.

  • Welcome back to Full Frame, buds.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Just as packed with features as they are with megapixels,

  • are three contenders in the best smartphone camera

  • of 2022 contest,

  • all have multiple lenses that provide perfectly good images.

  • But to crown the very best smartphone camera,

  • I'm gonna be going through each lens,

  • and whatever camera has the most winning lenses,

  • well, they take the crown.

  • Let's start with the widest one, the Ultra wide.

  • Our three contenders all have 12 megapixel f2.2

  • ultra wide lenses with macro modes.

  • And with similar specs, come similar photos

  • that are only differentiated

  • by the processing each camera does after the photo is taken.

  • Although many, and I mean, many of these photos

  • are hard to tell apart,

  • the iPhone wins narrowly

  • by allowing the shadows to be shadows.

  • An ultra wide lens can create a great deal of impact

  • by exaggerating the frame, warping those edges just a bit.

  • And what makes that drama stronger is contrast.

  • And at night, when all of these cameras

  • have their own downfalls,

  • I mean the iPhone and Pixel's reflections here,

  • the total lack of clarity here,

  • the iPhone reproduces an image

  • that most looks like what I was seeing, irl.

  • The iPhone also preserves a bit more detail

  • in the highlights.

  • You can see it here in the clouds

  • or on the side of this church.

  • And it's this small difference

  • that makes the iPhone the winner of the ultra wide,

  • but so, so narrowly.

  • And unfortunately, that contrast and clarity

  • can't make up for the iPhone's lack of a telephoto lens.

  • So the iPhone 14 Pro,

  • it does have a 12 megapixel f2.8 telephoto lens,

  • but it optically only extends to a 3x zoom

  • or a 77 millimeter equivalent.

  • The Pixel 7 Pro has a 48 megapixel Quad Bayer,

  • so that's a 12 megapixel equivalent

  • five times or 116.2 millimeter, f3.5 telephoto lens.

  • And the S22 Ultra,

  • well, it has both a 10 megapixel, 3x f2.4 lens

  • and a 10 megapixel, 10x f4.9 lens.

  • For this test though, I'm only gonna compare

  • each camera's farthest reaching lens

  • since it's the telephoto comparison.

  • And that 10x telephoto lens on the S22 Ultra,

  • it's equivalent to 230 millimeters,

  • and it is very crisp in great light.

  • Far crisper than the iPhone and the Pixel

  • digitally zoomed to 10 times.

  • I have had so much fun taking photos with this focal length.

  • The contrast levels are dramatic, but not too much,

  • so the image is nicely flattened out,

  • but quite plainly, this camera can see further than my eye

  • and it's just fun to show off.

  • But at night, that f4.9 aperture

  • really slows this lens down, and it is shocking

  • how much the image quality drops.

  • Even with its optical and digital stabilization,

  • images are pixelated, obviously over-processed,

  • and just flat out blurry.

  • In dark situations, you can get a much clearer photo

  • from the Pixel's 5x lens,

  • which is a bit sharper than the iPhone's 3x.

  • The Pixel does a nice job of smoothing the image

  • while also capturing enough light to preserve the details.

  • So for daylight shooting,

  • nothing comes close to the S22 Ultra's telephoto lens,

  • but at night, that Pixel 7 Pro, it still can't be beat.

  • So both of 'em get a point.

  • Wow wee, so whether I'm checking

  • if there's something stuck in my teeth

  • or I'm on a Zoom call, the front facing camera is

  • by far the most used camera on my phone.

  • And on the iPhone, you have a 12 megapixel

  • f1.9 true up camera.

  • The Pixel has a 10.8 megapixel, f2.2 front facing camera.

  • And then the S22 Ultra has a 40 megapixel

  • f2.2 front facing camera.

  • Also, the image is incredibly sharp and clear,

  • almost too sharp, some might argue, I happen to love it,

  • but when you compare it to the iPhone, well,

  • the iPhone's just not as sharp.

  • That's not to say it's blurry though either.

  • I like the way the Apple's, you know, not over sharpening

  • the image at all.

  • And ah, man, this Pixel, I don't know,

  • it's just like too contrasty for me.

  • I wish that they would tone it down a bit.

  • But how do all of these cameras look when it's a bit darker?

  • Okay, welcome to the dark.

  • What you'll notice right off the bat

  • is the iPhone is dark.

  • Much like it's photos, it's really not afraid

  • to keep the shadow shadows.

  • And when it comes to video on the front face camera,

  • I'm not sure that's the best idea,

  • but it does have the least amount of smoothing and noise.

  • The Pixel, it kind of sits

  • right in between these two, right?

  • I mean, you can kind of see my face a little bit better,

  • but it's a lot of noise and grain happening.

  • And then on the S22 Ultra, you can see me the best.

  • It really is gathering a lot of light,

  • but with it comes a pretty fair amount of noise.

  • On the photo side, more megapixels

  • doesn't always mean high resolution photos,

  • but in good light, the S22 Ultra's front facing camera

  • is a step above the competition.

  • The naturally blurred background is subtle,

  • yet adds a great deal of value.

  • And overall, this camera provides more detail

  • than the iPhone or the Pixel.

  • If you do want even more blur though,

  • Samsung has the best cutout and portrait mode too.

  • Lower light situations can cause the S22 Ultra to be

  • a bit less predictable and fall into some bad smoothing.

  • For example, the iPhone did a much better job here

  • of providing a clear image.

  • But overall, I love the level of contrast detail in depth

  • the S22 Ultra provides.

  • It gets the win.

  • It's time for the title match, folks.

  • The most important round, the wide lens.

  • And right off the bat, I'm gonna knock one camera

  • out of the competition completely.

  • Although the Pixel every so often has a big win

  • in low light, I have found that overall,

  • it's continually a step behind the S22 Ultra

  • and the iPhone 14 Pro.

  • The system's choices are incredibly inconsistent,

  • with photos either leaning too magenta or too blue.

  • Sometimes they lack contrast

  • and it's hardware creates these strange light reflections,

  • both during the day and night.

  • Not to mention that it's added features like cinematic mode

  • and stabilization often fall flat.

  • It is by no means a bad camera,

  • but it is not as consistently good as its competitors.

  • Okay, but the iPhone 14 Pro,

  • it has a 48 megapixel wide lens that is pixel bin

  • to a 12 megapixel sensor,

  • unless you're shooting in raw mode.

  • There's also a 2x lens option

  • that crops in on that 48 megapixel sensor

  • to create 12 megapixel images,

  • but since that lens is using the same sensor

  • as the main wide lens,

  • I'm not gonna spend too much time on it.

  • The 48 megapixel photos

  • from the standard wide lens are gorgeous.

  • I don't think that the average user is going to tap

  • on this raw option often,

  • but for anyone wanting the most amount of detail,

  • well, you got it.

  • Photos feel like you can reach into the screen

  • and just grab this cone right out.