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  • Hey guys, I'm here with my niece, Molly,  

  • and today we're starting a new series  where we talk about people's jobs. So  

  • we're going to learn some vocabulary related to  certain jobs and of course we'll study idioms,  

  • American English pronunciation, and lots of  things about English conversation as we go.

  • Working in the US or with American companieswhat vocabulary is useful to know? We're  

  • studying English, talking about jobs, and of  course we're going to study idioms and level  

  • up your advanced vocabulary that's relevant  to ALL conversational English. Molly's job  

  • is photography. What other jobs do you  want me to explore? Let me know in the  

  • comments. And be sure to download my Sounds  of American English cheat sheet, it's free,  

  • it's an illustrated reference guide for  you for the sounds of American English,  

  • including the phonetic symbols you need to  know. Link here and in the video description.

  • Molly, how did you get into wedding photographyHow do you get gigs? How does all that work?

  • I studied photography in college. I did  not really expect that weddings would be  

  • the route I would take but I shadowed a wedding  photographer who had her own business and I was  

  • something that's called a second shooter, which  is kind of like the assistant. I walk around and  

  • I help her. When she takes pictures of  the women, I take pictures of the men.

  • Let's focus in on some verbs here.

  • Molly, how did you get into wedding  photography? How do you get gigs?

  • Get into. A phrasal verb. To start learning about  something. Begin doing a new activity or hobby.  

  • To express the opposite, we  say, “get out of.” For example,  

  • I got out of the restaurant business  because it was too stressful.

  • Another way to use 'get into' is to mean you  become very passionate about something, you  

  • realize you just love it. I'd always liked artbut I got really into ceramics in high school.  

  • We can also use the phasewhat's gotten into  you?” to address someone who's acting strange,  

  • or a child who is misbehaving a lot. For exampleif I take my kids out to dinner and they're being  

  • really loud and obnoxious, I might say, “guyswhat's gotten into you? Please quiet down.“

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  • Molly, how did you get into wedding  photography? How do you get gigs?

  • A gig is a noun that's a single professional  engagement. You're not an employee of a company,  

  • but you've gotten hired to do one particular  thing. You're a contractor. Often we use this  

  • for musical performances. Our band hasgig at a club tonight. It can be used for  

  • any job though, especially one that  has a short or uncertain time frame.  

  • He's got a gig lifeguarding at the community pool  this summer. I've also heard gig used as a verb.

  • The singers gigged with some of  the biggest names in the industry.

  • Here, I'm asking about Molly's individual events.  

  • How do people book you to take photos  of their wedding? How do you get gigs?

  • I studied photography in college. I did not really  

  • expect that weddings would  be the route I would take.

  • The route I would take. A route is a course,  a way, a road for travel. She says route with  

  • the OW as innowdiphthong, although I do  sometimes hear it route with the OO vowel.  

  • Mail carriers have a regular route they  take. A city bus has a route you can look  

  • up. Molly said she didn't expect that she  would end up photographing weddings. She  

  • thought she might do something more related  to fine art, but she went the wedding route.

  • But I shadowed a wedding photographer who  had her own business. I was something that's  

  • called a second shooter, which  is kind of like the assistant.

  • You've heard shadow as a noun. When a source  of light is blocked by something, that thing  

  • casts a shadow. But have you heard shadow as  a verb? This is exactly what it sounds like.  

  • She shadowed a wedding photographer. Molly walked  around very closely observing this person at work,  

  • as if Molly herself were the photographer's  shadow. We use it as a verb especially when  

  • talking about job shadowing. This is how you  would learn the tasks of a certain position.  

  • My nephew recently shadowed some  physical therapists since he was  

  • thinking of going into that fieldLet's hear that one more time.

  • But I shadowed a wedding photographer who  had her own business. I was something that's  

  • called a second shooter, which  is kind of like the assistant.

  • Now, as Molly is explaining her  experience being a second shooter,  

  • listen for the verb tense she uses.

  • I walk around and I help her. When she takes  pictures of the women, I take pictures of the men.

  • Did you catch it? Simple present. She's  speaking in present tense to explain the  

  • job or tell a story even though she  actually did these actions in the  

  • past. This is a conversational strategy  we use all the time. It helps make the  

  • story feel more relevantkind of like  you're in itlike it's happening now.

  • Then I asked her what her favorite thing  about being a wedding photographer is.

  • I love being part of people's big day. I'm right  there. I'm right there when the bride, the groom,  

  • the grooms, whoever's getting married, I get to  be right there. I get to see them when they see  

  • each other for the first time. I get to interact  with their family members. It's so, so special.

  • Big day. This is essentially a synonym for  wedding day or graduation day. But you can  

  • also use it for any life-changing eventeven for  a retirement celebration or the birth of a child.  

  • When's the big day? The baby's due October 29.

  • I get to capture it how I see it. And  the emotions I'm feeling. It's really  

  • personal and I like that. And I love the  artistic side of it too. Taking pictures  

  • of really small details like the flowers  and the rings, and interacting with guests.

  • Have you used this word?

  • I get to capture it how I see it.

  • In the visual arts, like photographydrawing, filmmaking, “capturemeans  

  • to represent or record something in lasting  form. The movie succeeded in capturing the  

  • atmosphere of Berlin in the 1930s. The  painting captured the subject's mood.  

  • Another meaning of this verb is to take by  force. Or gain control over something or  

  • someone. The police captured the suspect. The army  captured the town. The ad captured our attention.

  • And I love the artistic side of it too.

  • She uses the adjective ofarthere. That -ic  ending is the suffix ending that makes a noun an  

  • adjective. Artistartistic. FantasyfantasticHistoryhistoric. Economyeconomic. Noun,  

  • adjective. Let me know if you think of otherswrite them in the comments below. Also,  

  • I have an entire course on how suffixes like  -ic affect word stress. Come study with me at  

  • your own pace at Rachel's English Academy.com if  you really want to train your American English.

  • Here's another use of artistic.

  • It's just a cool way to like use like an artistic  eye as kind of a gift to give to other people.

  • An eye, a way of seeing things. He has a great  eye for fashion. Or, my sister-in-law has a  

  • good eye for thrifting. She sees something  for sale cheap that she knows she can sell  

  • for a nice profit online. An artistic eye means  an artistic way of seeing things. She's able to  

  • get more artful, beautiful shots than someone  like me, who doesn't have an artistic eye.

  • Then I asked Molly what the  hardest part of her work is.

  • Hardest thing is it is very physical. I'm  on my feet for eight hours. I'm always on.

  • On my feet. Standing, walking, up  and active. If you're on your feet,  

  • you're moving around. You're standing all day.

  • Hardest thing is it is very physical. I'm  on my feet for eight hours. I'm always on.

  • I'm on all day. This implies on-duty, workor doing something official. My husband and  

  • I also use it to talk about parenting. Heycan you be on from 4-5? I'd like to work out.

  • Now, we'll hear 5 phrases that you  can use to describe pretty much any  

  • job where you're putting in 110%. That isyou're working hard and doing your best.

  • It is high-pressure. You don't want to miss  anything. And you want to do your best. You're  

  • giving a client a product, and you want it  to be up to your own standards of delivering  

  • a product that you think is good and captures  the mood of the certain event that you're at.

  • Right, and there are no  redos; you can't do it again.

  • Um-m. Do the cake cut again? No. I'm always  really, that's the part that I think is the most  

  • emotionally stressful is I have to get it. And if  I don't get it, they're not getting it captured  

  • by me. Like, maybe a guest has a cell phone out  and they're taking a picture, but it's up to me.

  • it's high-pressure. It's stressful. The  outcome depends very much on me and how I  

  • perform. Something that's high-pressure  also implies that you have to get it  

  • right the first time. If you can try  something as many times as you need to,  

  • then there's not much pressure. But in  this case, when things only happen once,  

  • you have to capture it right the first timethe only time. There is no second chance.

  • Up to your own standards. Your own level of  quality. Everyone has their own standards.  

  • They might be high, they maybe not so high, but  you want to make sure you're meeting your own  

  • standards so you can feel good about what you're  doing. We use this with things like work and  

  • products, but also with relationships. If someone  is always ending relationships because of finding  

  • flaws, you might say, her standards are too highShe's never going to find a perfect partner.

  • Delivering a product. To finish a task or  product and get it to the person purchasing.  

  • My video editor should be delivering  the next round of edits by Tuesday.

  • No redos. Redo, do again. You can't do it  again, there are no redos. If you mess up,  

  • that's too bad. This is where that  high-pressure feeling comes from.

  • It's up to me. It's my job. It's my  responsibility. If I don't do it,  

  • it won't get done. It's up to me.

  • Now, we're going to move quickly. I've  pulled 14 vocabulary terms, phrases,  

  • or idioms that you can use to discuss  any field of work. I'll put the phrases  

  • on-screen as they happen in the conversationand then give a brief definition at the end.

  • So, I have a website. And  it's kind of word-of-mouth.

  • Word-of-mouth. Informal, oral communicationHer advertising is mostly word of mouth.  

  • She doesn't pay to run ads. But  people use her for their weddings,  

  • and then they tell friends  about it. Word of mouth.

  • I'm not super great at like sharing  beyond that. Marketing yourself.

  • Marketing yourself. This includes everything  from building your own personal brand to a  

  • list of potential customers to showcasing what  you do online and in person. Getting your name  

  • out there. It's very proactive. This is different  from word-of-mouth where other people are telling  

  • potential clients about you, you yourself  have to do it. You're marketing yourself.

  • How do you make a living at  that kind of photography?

  • Make a living. To earn the money you need  to pay for housing, food, transportation,  

  • healthcare and so on. I'm a writer, but  to make a living, I work at a restaurant.

  • Also, to kind of sustain and support  photographers, a lot of photographers do wedding.

  • Sustain and support. Here, these words are  synonyms for the idiom, “make a living.”  

  • Paying for life's necessities. Their passion may  be nature photography, but they can't make enough  

  • money doing that to live, so they pick up wedding  photography to sustain and support themselves.

  • Or portraits, engagement sessions. A headshot.

  • A headshot is a photo of someone's faceespecially  

  • taken for the purpose of promoting that  person in some way professionally. I had  

  • headshots taken back when I was a singer  going out for various opera auditions.

  • Wedding photography isway to keep yourself going.

  • Keep yourself going. Another  synonym formake a livingin  

  • this case. Pay the bills. You may  have also heard, “make ends meet.”

  • Wedding photography is a way to  keep yourself going so that you  

  • can also do some more artistic things on the side.

  • On the side. Maybe you've used this when  ordering food. I'd like the dressing on the  

  • side. This means I want a salad but I don't want  the salad dressing mixed in, you want it separate,  

  • in its own container, on the side. Or, a side  dish. Not your main entree. I'd like a burger  

  • with a side of onion rings. With work it meansin addition to, not your main thing. I teach