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  • - [Falcon] Open-world games are amazing.

  • What we can see in a virtual world in a video game nowadays

  • blows my mind on a regular basis,

  • but still, some of it is a little weird.

  • Hi, folks, it's Falcon, and today on Gameranx,

  • 10 open-world concepts that make no sense whatsoever.

  • Just a quick note, before we get going here,

  • we actually did a similar topic video a while back

  • called 10 dumb things that only happen in open-world games,

  • so bear in mind,

  • we're gonna try to avoid repeating too much

  • from that one.

  • We love open-world games, and we play a lot of them,

  • so it's not as if we haven't noticed

  • a fair amount of things anyways.

  • So let's get going with it.

  • Starting off at number 10,

  • let's start with something blatantly ridiculous,

  • grappling the ground as you fall to your death.

  • So have you ever played an open-world game

  • where they have a grappling hook in it,

  • like "Just Cause" or "Dying Light"?

  • These are an innovation of games in recent years

  • that just makes games so fun.

  • I absolutely love grappling hooks,

  • but I want to go ahead and say

  • that they have a few things that just don't make sense.

  • One, if you've ever seen a real grappling hook launcher,

  • they're very, very big,

  • and it's kind of bizarre when you think about

  • how much power you would need to pull a human being up.

  • But this isn't the that-makes-no-sense element of it.

  • Of course, we have to have some suspension of disbelief

  • in order to make a game fun.

  • Mechanics are obviously not going to be completely true

  • to life in a game that's like,

  • "Hey, here's a grappling hook. Zip around the world."

  • But there's one thing, wow, does it not make sense?

  • You can easily save yourself from deadly falls in some games

  • by simply grappling the ground,

  • and this does not make any sense, and for so many reasons.

  • I mean, both in "Dying Light" and "Just Cause,"

  • it makes no sense that like,

  • so you've hit terminal velocity,

  • you would die if you landed,

  • so you grapple the ground

  • and start going towards the ground faster.

  • At that point, they're just like, you know what?

  • Whatever. It doesn't matter if makes sense.

  • What more do you really need to say here?

  • Grappling with the ground makes it

  • so you don't hurt yourself when falling to the ground.

  • You know your game is wild as hell

  • when literal superhero games

  • have more realistic physics in them.

  • The only reason this works at all is because it's super fun.

  • Having a consistent grapple that is always pulling you

  • straight to your destination safely,

  • it's obviously there purely for the player's benefit.

  • It just makes it easier to get around.

  • But I can't even count the times

  • ground grappling has saved my life in "Dying Light."

  • So at the end of the day, I can't complain.

  • It just doesn't make sense.

  • I guess who cares, though, right?

  • It's fun.

  • At number nine,

  • people in the street who have zero survival instinct.

  • Since "Grand Theft Auto III" came out

  • and pretty much defined the open-world genre,

  • one consistent thing that these games all have

  • in some capacity is dumb NPCs.

  • Certain games obviously are better than others,

  • but in general,

  • the people encounter in the streets in open-world games

  • have the self-preservation instincts of a fruit fly.

  • Actually, no, scratch that.

  • Flies are actually kind of hard to kill.

  • NPCs? Mmm.

  • If you tried to smack them with a person-sized fly swatter,

  • I don't know that they would get out of the way.

  • Flies tend to.

  • These guys, on the other hand, often just stand there,

  • let your mow 'em down with a car.

  • And even if they've got the basic idea to do a little dodge,

  • generally, they go about their day

  • like nothing happened afterwards.

  • Sometimes they panic and run away,

  • but just as likely, they'll freeze in place and do nothing.

  • Maybe they'll duck down a little, but that's about it.

  • It's almost like they want to die.

  • In most games, these guys just don't even try.

  • In "GTA," it's pretty ridiculous,

  • but dumb pedestrians really take it to the next level

  • in other games like "Prototype,"

  • where there's hundreds of people

  • just kind of milling around

  • outside the middle of a zombie apocalypse.

  • It's really your own fault

  • if you get snatched and absorbed into a monstrous biomass

  • at that point.

  • You're kind of hopeless.

  • The reason for why open-world NPCs are so dumb

  • is a simple one.

  • AI is something that's pretty system-taxing, even now,

  • and most games just don't really bother

  • making the people wandering the streets that smart.

  • They're just kind of there for window dressing,

  • so they don't do much more than walk back and forth

  • and sometimes yell at you when you drive on the sidewalk.

  • Some games definitely are better at it than others,

  • like "GTA's" pedestrians are way smarter

  • than "Cyberpunk's" brain-dead, I guess, people.

  • They're all robots on some level, though, right?

  • I don't know. I don't know.

  • They're not very smart in "Cyberpunk"

  • is what I'm getting at.

  • And, you know, that's more the norm.

  • In general, people in the street in games

  • just don't seem to mind a whole lot about getting killed.

  • At number eight,

  • when metal and wooden fences are easy to smash through,

  • but a little brush has an unbreakable barrier.

  • And you know what we're talking about here.

  • This sort of thing pops up in pretty much all of them.

  • You're driving along, smashing through everything in sight,

  • when suddenly, this small, if it were in real life,

  • easily breakable barrier stops you dead in your tracks,

  • like in "GTA" when you slam through a traffic light,

  • no problem, but a bush totals the car,

  • or in "Forza Horizon 4,"

  • where these small stone walls are everywhere

  • that your car plows through with like no effort,

  • but then there are others small stone walls in town

  • around people's houses that are just too much.

  • They look almost the same, really similar,

  • but one you can smash and the other you can't.

  • It's especially annoying going back to older games,

  • where it was even more inconsistent,

  • like in games where you can just smash through trees,

  • but then a metal fence stops you dead.

  • For one, certain things are just way too easy

  • to crash through.

  • I mean, if you actually tried to ram into an electrical pole

  • or traffic light, your car would get totaled.

  • However, in these games,

  • these things bend over like a plastic straw,

  • and I'm talking the kind of plastic straws

  • designed to bend, mind you.

  • And most cars in open-world games

  • are just like rolling tanks,

  • unless they're GTA Trilogy cars,

  • which can both smash through everything, no problem,

  • but a stiff wind sometimes make them explode.

  • Other reason, it's really inconsistent.

  • If you smash through a normally impassable thing,

  • why can't you smash through this

  • other normally impassible thing?

  • That's what's so annoying about this stuff.

  • It's not just that it doesn't make sense.

  • It's not even consistent.

  • And at number seven, climbing towers tells you everything.

  • "Assassin's Creed" has a lot to answer for as a series.

  • What is supposed to be happening when you climb a tower

  • and the camera swirls around,

  • shows you all the pickups and the objectives in the area?

  • Most of the time, you can't physically see all this stuff,

  • so what is going on?

  • Is it magic powers or something?

  • And so many games have this,

  • but it feels like "Assassin's Creed" games

  • are the ones that really popularized the use of towers