Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello, everyone.

  • And welcome back to Shaw English.

  • My name is Mike.

  • And today we're going to be reviewing the active and passive voice in English.

  • Now, we've already made a good amount of videos on the passive voice, so if you haven't seen them,

  • make sure you watch it here.

  • Today, we are going to start with reviewing the basic grammar rule for passive voice as

  • well as the how and when to use the passive voice.

  • We're going to do a ton of examples and give you so much practice, that way you are going

  • that way you are going to be masters of the passive voice.

  • Make sure you stay until the end of the video because you will have a quiz and homework.

  • Let's get to it.

  • Let's review the basic grammar for the active and passive voice.

  • We have a lovely sentence here,

  • Dutch colonists founded New York in 1624.”

  • This is an example of a sentence that is written in the active voice.

  • We have our 'doer', the Dutch colonists.

  • We have our action 'founded'.

  • As well as our 'receiver', New York.

  • See active sentences follow the Subject - Verb - Object pattern.

  • Again, our subject, our verb, and our object.

  • Here is our sentence written in the passive voice,

  • New York was founded in 1624.”

  • So in our active voice sentence, 'New York' is a receiver and written at the end of the sentence.

  • Well now, in our passive voice sentence,

  • 'New York' is brought to the front because it is now our focus.

  • Also, for our action, we need a 'to be' verb and the past participle.

  • In the active voice sentence, we've hadwe have 'founded' which is written in the simple past tense.

  • Well, our 'to be' verb has to match with being simple past tense so we have 'was'

  • and the past participle which isfounded in 1624.”

  • I can swear something is missing though.

  • What am I missing from this?

  • Ah! “ … by the Dutch colonists.”

  • We don't mention the Dutch colonists here which is our 'doer'.

  • Why don't we mention the 'doer'?

  • As I mentioned in previous videos, sometimes when you write sentences in the passive voice,

  • you leave out the 'doer' because the information isit's unnecessary.

  • Also, we're focusing on New York.

  • So again there's no reason to mention the Dutch colonists here.

  • Let's move on to some more examples.

  • I need your help filling these blanks.

  • Can you help me?

  • Of course you can.

  • Let's read some of these sentences together.

  • “I ate the pizza.”

  • This sentence is written in the active voice.

  • The pizza _blank_ by me.”

  • This sentence is written, that's right you guessed it, in the passive voice.

  • I need to figure out what word goes in the blank.

  • Well, the action is missing.

  • If I look at the active voice sentence,

  • I see that our action is 'ate' which is written in past tense.

  • We remember from earlier, that our actions in passive voice sentences

  • need a 'to be' verb as well as a past participle.

  • So I know that since this action is written in past tense,

  • my 'to be' verb also has to be written in past tense.

  • So let's write 'was'

  • as our 'to be' verb.

  • But we still need a past participle.

  • So looking at our action, 'ate'…

  • Let me think

  • There is 'eat', 'ate', 'eaten'.

  • 'eaten' would be our past participle.

  • And of course, who was it eaten by?

  • Me.

  • The pizza was eaten by me.”

  • And it was good pizza.

  • Let's look at our second example.

  • The scissors or blank the paper.”

  • This is a sentence written in the active voice.

  • Our passive voice sentence is, “The paper was cut by the scissors.”

  • Well, since we have to figure out what's in the blank for our active voice sentence,

  • let's look at the passive one to help us with that.

  • The paper was cut by the scissors.”

  • Well, I have my 'to be' verb, as well as our past participle.

  • Now we're going toit's almost like we're going backwards here, right.

  • So, we know that our 'to be' verb, or the tense of our 'to be' verb,

  • has to match our action in our active voice sentence.

  • Our past participle is 'cut'.

  • So when I think about what our action could be,

  • let me see

  • What is …? This is 'cut', 'cut', and 'cut'.

  • Wow.

  • So our action in our active voice sentence is 'cut'

  • because it can't be 'cutted'

  • because that's not a word.

  • So our past tense is 'cut the scissors', 'cut the paper'.

  • Whoa, good job everyone.

  • Let's move on to some more examples.

  • All right, everyone. I need some help finding mistakes in these two sentences.

  • Both of them are written in the passive voice.

  • Let's look at the first one together.

  • The book was wrote by Mike.”

  • Yeah, there's a mistake here.

  • Well I see I have my 'to be' verb, 'was'.

  • But...

  • there's something about this past participle that just doesn't seem right.

  • Well, what is the past participle of write?

  • Let me see

  • There's 'write', 'wrote', 'written'.

  • Oh how did I nothow do we not know that? “written

  • The book was written by Mike.”

  • Yeah, that sounds right. I'm sure it was a good book.

  • Our next one.

  • The criminal was catched.”

  • Again, I see that we have our 'to be' verb which is 'was'.

  • But that feels right.

  • But there's something about 'catched' that doesn't.

  • This may not be the right past participle.

  • So let's think about the word 'catch'.

  • Hmm.

  • We have 'catch', 'caught', and 'caught'.

  • Oh our past participle is 'caught'.

  • The criminal was caught.”

  • And I'm glad.

  • Good job, everyone.

  • Let's move on.

  • I still need your help everyone.

  • Can you please help me figure out whether these sentences are written in the active

  • or passive voice?

  • All right, thanks.

  • Let's look at the first one.

  • The dog licked my face.”

  • Well, looking at this sentence, I do not see a 'to be' verb.

  • And my action 'licked' is just written in past tense.

  • This is definitely written in the active voice.

  • The rat was studied by the scientist.”

  • Whoa, we have a lot of clues here.

  • We can see that we have a 'to be' verb, 'was'.

  • As well as, boom, we have a past participle.

  • And 'by'.

  • We know that by sometimes tells us who's the 'doer'.

  • Well this is definitely written in the passive voice.

  • He kicked the ball.”

  • I don't see a 'to be' verb here.

  • And 'kick'… it's like it's written in the past tense.

  • He kicked the ball.”

  • This is definitely written in the active voice.

  • And our last one.

  • All the patients were interviewed.”

  • Hmm

  • Well we can see the word 'were'.

  • This is a 'to be' verb.

  • As well as a past participle.

  • There is no 'doer'.

  • So we also know that that's normal for passive voice sentences.

  • All right.

  • We did a good job again.

  • Let's move on to some more examples.

  • Okay, everyone.

  • Let's match the tenses in these active and passive voice sentences.

  • Let's start here with this active voice sentence.

  • “I am cleaning my room.”

  • The passive voice sentence of that is, “My room is _blank_ by me.”

  • I can see that I have a 'to be' verb, 'is'.

  • But I'm not done.

  • It's incomplete.

  • Well, if I look at my action in the active voice sentence,

  • we have 'cleaning'.

  • 'cleaning' is written in the present continuous tense.

  • I know from earlier, that my 'to be' verb has to match with the same tense.

  • So, “My room is… “

  • 'being' Oh, that's a great 'to be' verb to use.

  • 'being'

  • But I'm missing the past participle.

  • In our action, in the active voice sentence, we have 'cleaning'.

  • So we have 'clean', 'cleaned', 'cleaned'.

  • My room is being cleaned by me.”

  • Awesome.

  • We're halfway there.

  • Our next sentence.

  • Written in the active voice.

  • “I have made a cake.”

  • And it's a good cake.

  • The passive voice sentence of that is,