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  • - If you've been watching the Tour de France so far,

  • then you may have seen the riders

  • taking on bags like this from people stood at the side

  • of the road, roughly halfway through each stage.

  • They're called Musettes, and they're full of food.

  • The reason for it is it means the riders

  • don't have to start each day stage

  • with their pockets jam packed full,

  • bursting with all the food that they'd need for the day.

  • In essence, they contain the riders' lunch.

  • In this video, we're going to go through

  • exactly what is in a typical musette,

  • we're also going to explain why it's there

  • and show you how to make some of the special things

  • that the pros eat like rice cakes.

  • But before we do, make sure you subscribe to GCN

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  • and, well, it's free and it helps support the channel.

  • Here is our GCN musette, I'm going to put everything in it.

  • Starting with the biggest item, which is bottles.

  • (relaxed electronic music)

  • Typically you'll find two bottles in a musette,

  • or bidon, is what they're called if you're French.

  • And this means that when the riders take their musette,

  • they'll get rid of the bottles that are on their bike

  • which means that if you're after a pro water bottle

  • as a souvenir, a good place to go,

  • is to hang around in or just after

  • the feed zone at a pro race.

  • There are loads of different things

  • that you can put inside bottles,

  • and these will be tailored for the individual riders

  • depending on their personal preference

  • but also the demands of a stage.

  • So you can just have plain old water in there.

  • And a lot of riders do, but you can also use energy powders

  • such as these from our friends of the channel, Enervit.

  • They come in either sachets or tubs.

  • And they allow you to rehydrate

  • with all the essential minerals

  • but also get in that fuel as well

  • and that carbohydrate for the stage.

  • Something else we've seen as a bit of a trend,

  • which we noticed at the Giro is some riders

  • actually have protein in some of their bottles.

  • And this'll typically be on a flat stage

  • where for someone who's a Grand Tour contender,

  • this is almost like a recovery day for them

  • and so, they'll have a bit of protein

  • in one of their bottles at some part during the stage

  • just to help that recovery process.

  • Personally, I like to have water in one my bottles

  • and then some energy powder in the other one.

  • So that's what I've got,

  • and they're going to go in the musette.

  • Next up is energy bars.

  • Now one of the great things about energy bars

  • is that they contain quite a lot of carbohydrates

  • in a relatively small volume, meaning,

  • well, they don't take up

  • a huge amount of space in your pocket.

  • Now they come in all sorts of different flavors

  • and types these days, and generally,

  • they're full of easy to absorb carbohydrates

  • which is what you want.

  • But a recent trend we've noticed

  • with pro riders is we're increasingly seeing them

  • go for ones with protein in.

  • Now, this has the added benefit

  • of helping the riders recover and adapt to exercise

  • while they're doing it.

  • Over the course of a three week Grand Tour

  • like the Tour de France, the small things

  • like recovering a bit better, can make all the difference.

  • I'm going to put a few of these in the bag

  • I'll put one of the protein ones in there.

  • And then a couple of these lemon cream flavor.

  • My favorite.

  • Next up is gels.

  • Now, gels are probably the most well known

  • and sort of, well, Family Fortunes top answer

  • for what cyclists eat on the bike.

  • They come in hundreds of different types

  • and flavors, but if you're not familiar

  • with what they are, they're essentially a very viscous,

  • sugary liquid that you can quickly slurp down,

  • get it in your system and it's rapidly absorbed

  • and gets into the bloodstream

  • to supply you with that glucose, fructose and sucrose

  • and other sugar molecules that are in there

  • to keep you fueled.

  • Now, there are loads of different kinds of gels,

  • there's isotonic gels to help keep you hydrated

  • on really hot days, and there's also caffeine gels

  • which are gels with caffeine in them.

  • And the pros like to take these

  • to give them a little bit of a boost,

  • generally towards the end of a stage.

  • And gels in general are something that they take

  • towards the back end of a race or stage,

  • they tend to start with more real solid food,

  • so the bars and the other bits we're going to get on to.

  • And then when they really want that quick boost

  • at the end, gels.

  • I'm going to put in this caffeine flavor one

  • for the end of today's stage for me.

  • What have we got here?

  • Cola flavor and orange flavor.

  • I'm a cola man, I'll have a cola gel.

  • Next up is something that you might not expect.

  • But it is something we see quite often in pro musettes.

  • And that is a can of fizzy drink.

  • Now, I am a normal sized human being,

  • this isn't a normal sized can.

  • Just wanted to clear that up

  • in case you thought I was a giant or something.

  • It's a little 150 milliliter can

  • instead of a normal 330 mil one.

  • Although you wouldn't see this particular drink

  • because I just picked this off Lloydie's desk

  • and it's beer, put that right over there.

  • You're more likely to see Coca-Cola.

  • And the reason for that is it's a sugary cold drink

  • and the riders, well, if they like the taste,

  • it's good for morale.

  • But you're not going to see a normal sized can

  • and the reason for that is it's fizzy

  • and the bubbles and the gas,

  • it could cause a bit of bloating,

  • a bit of indigestion which isn't what you want

  • while you're riding a bike.

  • But we'll put it in the musette.

  • In many musettes, you'll find little sandwiches

  • called paninis, within the sport, referring to Italian.

  • And they'll often be wrapped like this.

  • Now, what they are is typically,

  • little sweet, well slightly sweet brioche buns

  • like this, no crusts, and then filled

  • with different fillings, it is lunchtime after all.

  • Now, Dan Lloyd's favorite filling he tells me,

  • was peanut butter with bits of banana in

  • so that's what we've gone for.

  • But chocolate spread is also common

  • if you're feeling naughty.

  • But also, more savory things, so, tuna,

  • ham, cheese, whatever, anything goes really.

  • Whatever the riders like.

  • So we're going to put a couple of these in the musette as well.

  • And while the carbohydrates in the little sandwich

  • aren't as easily absorbed

  • as something like a specialist energy powder,

  • it is nice to have something that's a little bit savory

  • and a little bit more solid

  • in and amongst all that easily absorbed food

  • and it's a bit nicer for the digestive system.

  • Especially over the course of three weeks.

  • Next up, rice cakes, I've got some here.

  • And rice cakes have become a firm favorite

  • amongst riders in the pro peloton.

  • And for good reason, rice is a great source of carbohydrate,

  • it's very easily absorbed and it places very little stress

  • on the digestive system and the gut of most people.

  • It's also low residue which means that

  • for the amount of energy it actually contains,

  • it doesn't leave much fiber behind in the gut.

  • So, you're not carrying the excess weight of that fiber

  • that wouldn't otherwise be doing anything

  • which is crucial in a sport like cycling

  • where power to weight is so important.

  • I'm going to put a couple of rice cakes in the musette

  • but before I do, we're going to head into the kitchen

  • and I'm going to show you exactly how you can make