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  • - So as the most successful musician of all time,

  • - (laughs) Yeah, yeah.

  • - could you tell me, why do people like music?

  • (guitar music)

  • (laughs)

  • - I mean, it's kind of like,

  • I don't know, why do people like eating food?

  • Or why do people like puppies and sunshine?

  • - [Craig] That's YouTuber and musician extraordinaire,

  • Rob Scallon.

  • He does things like play Slayer on banjo,

  • (intense banjo music)

  • create real life delay,

  • (guitar music)

  • the largest pedalboard,

  • and he makes pretty, pretty music,

  • which is why I asked him,

  • "Why do you like music?"

  • - Well, I mean, what was your answer?

  • - I don't have it, I'm looking for the answer!

  • Rob's reaction was pretty common among the people I asked.

  • Why do people like music?

  • (laughs)

  • Answer me this simple question.

  • Why do people like music?

  • - Um, it's kind of a weird question.

  • (laughs)

  • - [Craig] Yes, it is.

  • Sam and Nate are members of the quintessential rock band,

  • Driftless Pony Club.

  • I also talked to two other members,

  • Matt and Craig.

  • I'm really nervous about this interview

  • because you are a member of

  • one of my all-time favorite bands.

  • I know.

  • So, "Why do people like music," is a weird question

  • because music seems so innate in us.

  • Not Nate in us, innate.

  • But what is music?

  • I think in one of my interviews, Craig said it best.

  • Allow me to quote the 20th century French-born composer,

  • Edgard Varese.

  • "What is music but organized noise?"

  • Thanks, Craig, but I already knew that,

  • I'm a big Varese-head.

  • That music just gets me moving.

  • (snaps fingers) (discordant music)

  • So the reason I'm asking this question is because

  • I find it interesting that organized noise

  • is something that we like.

  • Like most ridiculous questions I ask

  • that I don't expect to find an answer to,

  • I just kind of want to ask it to learn about stuff.

  • Reasons why people like music, one.

  • - Music is the most efficient way

  • to communicate emotion.

  • - [Craig] Like, why do you, personally, like music?

  • - I think because of the expression of it.

  • I'm expressing myself and communicating.

  • I think that applies whether you're making music

  • or listening to it.

  • - Can you figure out what it is that makes a song

  • a good song?

  • - I think a good song puts together a feeling

  • that you know what it is,

  • but you never actually, like, put your finger on it before.

  • It helps crystallize maybe something you know,

  • but you don't know how to express.

  • - Music probably arose before we actually could speak.

  • - Oh, you think so?

  • - Because you can see music in the animal kingdom

  • all over the place.

  • Birds sing, (birds chirping)

  • whales sing. (whale groaning)

  • - [Craig Voiceover] Because I like nothing more

  • than proving Matt wrong, I did a bit of research

  • and I came to a very satisfying answer to the question,

  • "Did music predate language?"

  • Answer,

  • (singing fanfare)

  • no one knows for sure.

  • There is a 50,000 year old Slovenian bone flute,

  • my nickname in high school,

  • made from an extinct bear

  • thought to be the world's oldest known instrument,

  • which means music probably predated that by a lot.

  • But, there's debate as to whether it's actually

  • an instrument at all, also,

  • we don't even know when language began, so...

  • On the other hand, language probably started

  • with a series of grunts, and hums, and whistles.

  • That's just a theory of mine, (grunting and whistling)

  • or an excuse to just use this B-roll.

  • And since music is organized noise,

  • then music came before language.

  • And actually, by that definition,

  • language is music.

  • We use notes to convey different ideas, am I right?

  • Am I right?

  • I'm right.

  • Now before we move on, I would like to thank the sponsor

  • of today's video, Flowkey, which is an app

  • that teaches you how to play the piano.

  • Can you feel ♪ (discordant piano playing)

  • The love tonight

  • Self taught.

  • Which is why I'm using this app,

  • so that I actually learn how to play piano.

  • And it teaches you sheet music.

  • I'm a self-taught guitar player,

  • so I don't really know sheet music either.

  • I've always messed around with piano,

  • I can do this little ditty.

  • (playing ""Heart and Soul"")

  • Not very well, obviously.

  • My sister taught me this one.

  • Doe, a deer, a female deer

  • Ray, a drop of golden sun

  • But I don't know the right place to put my fingers.

  • I don't know how to play chords.

  • But that's exactly what this does,

  • it shows me how to play chords,

  • and it has "wait mode," so it'll listen to you

  • play the notes and it'll pause the song

  • until you play the correct notes,

  • so you learn at your own pace.

  • It's a music teacher, and I don't even have to

  • leave my own house, or put pants on,

  • but I will 'cause it's kind of cold down here.

  • And when my daughter is older,

  • she can use this app to learn,

  • although she's already pretty good, check it out.

  • (discordant piano playing)

  • It has over 1500 songs you can learn,

  • from Chopin to the Beatles,

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  • Tetris.

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  • So you can click the link below

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  • and start learning piano today.

  • (discordant piano playing)

  • So music, other than spoken language,

  • may be an older and simpler, yet more fundamental

  • form of language that's better at expressing emotions

  • than words can.

  • Or it just may communicate emotions quicker.

  • Like, have you ever heard of the devil's tritone?

  • (clears throat loudly)

  • (plays dissonant chord)

  • Lovely, isn't it? (plays dissonant chord)

  • It's called a tritone because it's two notes

  • that are three whole steps apart.

  • It communicates tension, something unresolved.

  • It wants you to play this chord.

  • (plays chord)

  • Or maybe...

  • (plays chords)

  • And then it sounds complete.

  • And you probably feel that tension, don't you?

  • Which leads to number two.

  • Two, it affects moods.

  • (foghorn blowing)

  • If you were listening to the devil's tritone all day,

  • I don't think I'd want to be around you.

  • Luckily, there are other chords.

  • - Like major seventh chords, oh my God.

  • I love them so much.

  • I could live in a major seventh chord

  • for the rest of my life.

  • - Why is that?

  • - A perfect major chord is like,

  • (plays major chord)

  • "Look at this beautiful sunset!"

  • Look at this, like, impossibly perfect thing.