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  • Rita Linkner: "The Botox chemical is physically addictive."

  • I think Botox is like getting your hair colored

  • or your nails done.

  • It's not like you have to, but you're going to want to.

  • Jordana Herschthal: "Botox is so simple,

  • anyone can give an injection."

  • My 2-year-old can push a plunger,

  • but it's also very easy to mess someone's face up.

  • "Botox will make you look emotionless."

  • Rita, can you tell I'm happy right now?

  • That's you happy?!

  • Hi, my name is Dr. Rita Linkner.

  • I am a board-certified dermatologist from New York City.

  • I spend the majority of my day doing injectables and lasers.

  • Hi, I'm Dr. Jordana Herschthal,

  • and I'm a board-certified dermatologist

  • in Boca Raton, Florida,

  • and I love talking with patients about their aesthetic goals

  • and helping them see the full picture.

  • And we're here today to debunk myths about Botox.

  • Myths from social media.

  • "Botox is toxic to your body."

  • This is not true,

  • but it's good to know the history of Botox.

  • Botox gets that name recognition.

  • It was the first neuromodulator that was FDA approved,

  • so it's a household name, like Kleenex and Xerox.

  • And so today we're going to be referring

  • to Botox as that umbrella term

  • when we're discussing all of the neuromodulators

  • that are currently FDA approved.

  • So, Botox contains a purified protein

  • known as botulinum toxin,

  • which is derived from a bacteria that causes botulism,

  • which is toxic to your body.

  • However, Botox used appropriately in appropriate dosing

  • is very safe and very effective.

  • There are over 3,000 studies

  • proving its efficacy and safety.

  • The other reason it is very safe to use

  • is we know that it stays where we inject it.

  • So it's not like you're getting Botox in your forehead

  • and it's going all over your body.

  • Botox is limited to where it is injected,

  • and it is safely metabolized

  • and excreted by your body in a few months.

  • I always tell patients if Botox was dangerous,

  • I literally wouldn't have a pulse.

  • I'm someone who puts, like, 100 units of Botox

  • into my face and neck every four and a half months.

  • And I have so for over a decade.

  • So, there are certain medical conditions

  • that are contraindicated to the use of Botox.

  • So you should have a very thorough discussion

  • with your provider before you receive a Botox treatment.

  • "Botox is permanent."

  • So, let's debunk this one.

  • Botox is not permanent.

  • Everybody metabolizes Botox differently.

  • One of the great things about Botox is

  • if you don't like the way it looks,

  • it's completely out of your system in three to six months.

  • But it's also the worst thing,

  • because if you like the way it looks,

  • you have to do it again.

  • There is a super-Botox that's out on the horizon, though,

  • that's looking to get FDA approved later this year.

  • It's going for FDA approval for 11s in between the eyebrows,

  • and I can tell you confidently that it works

  • and it's going to have an indication

  • that's going to be longer than three to five months.

  • Herschthal: "Some creams and serums work like Botox."

  • This is absolutely false.

  • Botox works at the muscular level,

  • at specifically the neuromuscular junction,

  • to prevent the muscle from contracting.

  • There is currently no serum, cream, or facial

  • that can penetrate the skin deep enough

  • to exert action at the level of the muscle.

  • And if it were true, it would have to have FDA approval

  • and it would not be available over the counter.

  • I completely agree.

  • I like to tell patients,

  • you're genetically programmed

  • to move your muscles in a certain way,

  • and over time you get what we call dynamic wrinkles,

  • which are lines associated with muscle movement.

  • And the way Botox works is it builds in resistance

  • so that you can't overutilize those muscles anymore,

  • you can't crease them,

  • and it basically helps to smooth everything out.

  • So, next myth, "Getting Botox is super painful."

  • I would have to say this one's false.

  • The pain of a Botox needle is pretty minimal,

  • but it is similar to

  • if you got, like, a splinter in your finger

  • or perhaps a beesting.

  • Everybody's experience with pain is different.

  • Linkner: They're insulin needles.

  • They're as small as you can get.

  • And it goes faster than people think, also.

  • Though I think location on the face

  • does make a big difference in terms of sensitivity.

  • And this relates to how important it is

  • for your provider to really have

  • a deep understanding of anatomy

  • when you're getting any sort of injectable on your face.

  • I mean, I can do a full face, a full neck of Botox

  • in probably under four minutes.

  • And if people are really averse to needles,

  • you could always topically numb someone

  • to help that pain dissipate.

  • There are other little tricks,

  • like vibration devices and also ice.

  • And even for patients who are really sensitive,

  • we break out the Pro-Nox,

  • which is half-dose laughing gas,

  • and that always calms patients down immediately

  • and leaves your system within five minutes.

  • Linkner: "The Botox chemical is physically addictive."

  • I think Botox is like getting your hair colored

  • or your nails done.

  • This is how I like to explain it to patients

  • who ask me, "If I do this once,

  • do I have to keep doing this for the rest of my life?"

  • It's not like you have to, but you're going to want to.

  • So, I always liken aesthetic treatments

  • like Botox, fillers, and lasers

  • to maintaining any organ in your system.

  • You get your teeth cleaned two to four times a year

  • or whatever it is;

  • you get your aesthetic treatments

  • because you're always aging.

  • These treatments do not stop the aging process,

  • but these treatments will help you age

  • the way you want to age.

  • Linkner: Myth experts hear the most.

  • "Botox is so simple, anyone can give an injection."

  • On the one hand, giving an injection is very easy.

  • Anyone can push a plunger,

  • my 2-year-old can push a plunger,

  • but it's also very easy to mess someone's face up.

  • So it's really critical

  • that your provider has a deep understanding of anatomy

  • and how these medicines affect anatomy

  • to give you reproducible,

  • great aesthetic outcomes.

  • So, Jordana and I are board-certified dermatologists.

  • It took each of us over a decade

  • to get to the point where we were able

  • to put a syringe in our hands

  • and utilize the medicine in it

  • to create facial aesthetics.

  • Both Jordana and I, still to this day,

  • we take courses religiously where we're learning

  • from the best international patients

  • and doing dissection courses.

  • And we're still reading every day

  • to really be the best teachers

  • that we can be for our patients.

  • "Botox and fillers are the same."

  • I love this myth,

  • because I probably address it at least once a day.

  • Almost every line on your face

  • can be addressed with filler,

  • but not every line can be addressed with Botox.

  • Botox works at the level of the muscle

  • to relax muscles of contraction.

  • It is preventing and diminishing those static lines,

  • or lines at rest.

  • Fillers, on the other hand, are used to address volume loss

  • that occurs in our face as we age.

  • So, we all have fat compartments all over our face.

  • And as we age, they deflate and descend with time,

  • so we use fillers to restore that lost volume