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  • Today, we're looking at contractions.

  • When is good to use them, and when is bad to use them.

  • Are you ready!? Because I'm...

  • I am...

  • Because I'm... because I'm...

  • Why is it that the Terminator chose to say,

  • I'll be back!

  • Instead of "I will be back"?

  • Why did Bill Clinton not contract this sentence?

  • I did not have sexual relations with that woman.

  • And why did king Joffrey not use the contraction "I'm" and, instead, say,

  • I am not tired!

  • So, obviously, it's better to use contractions in everyday speech.

  • For example, "I'm tired", "I'm eating", "I'll do this."

  • That sounds normal.

  • It would sound like a robot to say things like, "I am eating", "I will be back".

  • Fun fact: The Terminator himself, Arnold Schwarzenegger, told this story.

  • Pronouncing the "I'll" was quite difficult for him with his thick Austrian accent.

  • ... for them and listen to it and said, "I'll... I'll..." it... it's just kind of like, uh... and the Terminator doesn't talk like that.

  • The Terminator would say, "I will be back".

  • However, the director insisted that he say "I'll be back" and not "I will be back."

  • Why? Because it sounds more human to say "I'll", the contraction.

  • But, of course, that's not always true.

  • Sometimes, it's better not to contract, for example:

  • Well, let's say someone asks you, "Have you finished work?"

  • And you reply, "Yes, I've."

  • This is a very common mistake I see with my students, and remember not to do it.

  • "Yes, I've"⏤that doesn't sound good.

  • You must have something after.

  • "Yes I finished." Fine.

  • "Yes, I've." Not fine

  • If you don't have that extra information after, don't contract it.

  • "Yes, I have." That's okay.

  • And the same is true for other subject-auxiliary or -modal-verb combos.

  • Don't contract them if there is no extra information afterwards.

  • Another example: "Would you like to blah, blah, blah?"

  • Yes, I'd.

  • Again, we have just the subject, this time, with a modal verb.

  • You should say, "Yes, I would," not "Yes, I'd."

  • Why?

  • Because there's no extra information.

  • If you contract it, remember to put that extra information.

  • Yes, I'd love to.

  • And negativesfine to contract.

  • In fact, it's betteryou should contract the negatives pretty much all the time.

  • For example, "Have you finished work?"

  • No, I have not.

  • That sounds a little strong, and, in some cases, maybe aggressive.

  • No, I haven't.

  • That looks better, more friendly, more human, not so much robot.

  • So, with the negatives, just remember to contract it.

  • Not using a contraction makes the sentence stronger.

  • It adds emphasis and, again, could sound more aggressive, so be careful.

  • And this is why King Joffrey said...

  • I am not tired!

  • He wanted to sound serious and add emphasis

  • I do not miss Joffrey.

  • See? Stronger!

  • And it also sounds more formal when it's not contracted.

  • That's why your English teacher will always say,

  • In formal writing, don't use contractions.

  • Because it sounds more formal when you don't contract.

  • Also, some language experts suggest that people don't use contractions when they speak when they want people to believe them.

  • To sound more convincing.

  • So, basically, when they're lying.

  • I did not have sexual relations with that woman.

  • Oh, he really wanted everyone to believe him.

  • So, the next time your boyfriend or girlfriend says, "I did not cheat on you."

  • That means they definitely cheated on you. Sorry.

  • I'm joking; please ignore that.

  • Thanks for watching; if you want to see more, click here to subscribe.

  • Oh, there's another video right here, but you don't have to watch that.

  • Just if you want.

  • Watch it.

Today, we're looking at contractions.

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