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  • - Hey, bud.

  • Welcome back.

  • Okay, so it's the end of tech season,

  • which means it is the Full-Frame

  • that I know you've been looking for.

  • Today, we are taking, arguably the best camera systems

  • you can get in a smartphone,

  • and we're putting them head to head.

  • I took 1,000 photos with the Pixel 6 Pro,

  • and another 1,000 photos with the iPhone 13 Pro,

  • to figure out which one of these cameras

  • is actually the best.

  • And with a little help from you,

  • I think we've gotten to the bottom of it.

  • This is Full-Frame, buds, let's get into it.

  • The Pixel 6 Pro's main camera is a 50-megapixel sensor

  • with an optically stabilized F1.85 lens,

  • that is hard-coated to produce 12.5-megapixel images.

  • Which means you can't actually capture

  • 50-megapixel images with this camera.

  • There's also a 12-megapixel ultra-wide at F2.2,

  • and a 48-megapixel telephoto at F3.5.

  • The iPhone 13 Pro rocks a 12-megapixel camera system

  • across the board, with an F2.8 telephoto,

  • an F1.5 main lens, and an F1.8 ultra-wide.

  • Enough of the numbers, let's get looking at photos.

  • And I want to start with the tele,

  • because there is almost no competition here.

  • Google's 48-megapixel tele provides 4X optical zoom,

  • and it is very sharp.

  • It flattens the image out

  • much like a larger telephoto lens would.

  • And its focused fall off is really sleek.

  • And when you put it side by side

  • with the iPhone's 12-megapixel 3X tele,

  • the iPhone photos begin to look muddled.

  • Especially when you punch in.

  • I was really surprised at just how much detail

  • the Pixel can capture.

  • And punching into this photo,

  • you can practically read the newspaper right here.

  • The next three photos were taken with night mode,

  • which on the Pixel, unfortunately,

  • can take up to five seconds.

  • On the iPhone, it maxes out at three seconds.

  • And some real bonus points go to the Pixel

  • for how it spreads these headlights.

  • This photo is digitally zoomed

  • as far as each camera would allow me.

  • On the Pixel that's 20X, and on iPhone that's 15X.

  • The clear winner of the telephoto competition is the Pixel.

  • I had such a good time taking photos

  • with this telephoto lens,

  • and I almost want to stop the entire review there.

  • But we have to talk about the ultra-wide on the Pixel.

  • At a 0.7 crop or 114 degree field of view,

  • the Pixel's ultra-wide is just barely wider

  • than the 82 degree main lens.

  • The iPhone's ultra-wide is a 0.5 crop

  • or 120 degree field of view.

  • And it's just a lot sharper.

  • Now, although the iPhone warps the image much more,

  • that effect makes for a much more dramatic image

  • that sells me on the grandiose nature of the buildings

  • or monument I was mostly shooting with it.

  • The ultra-wide is where you also see a little bit too much

  • of that HDR look that the Pixel loves.

  • Shadows are just completely brightened up,

  • and I much preferred the contrast that the iPhone provides.

  • Again, it adds to the epic nature of a wide-angle photo.

  • The iPhone wins the ultra-wide contest.

  • (gentle music)

  • On the front of the Pixel is an 11.1-megapixel camera.

  • And on the iPhone, there is a 12-megapixel TrueDepth camera.

  • Both are great in perfect lighting,

  • and capture a nice amount of detail.

  • Now, I'm gonna call this a tie,

  • because it was 50-50 on which images I liked more.

  • For example, I really like how I look

  • in this photo on the Pixel.

  • I like the color blue behind me,

  • and I like that my skin tone isn't as washed out.

  • Although in low-light, I found that the iPhone

  • held onto my skin tones just a bit better.

  • And when there was no light,

  • well, neither of these cameras performed well.

  • All right, so it looks like it comes down to the main lens.

  • And this is where things get a little tougher.

  • (chilled music)

  • I like the amount of contrast

  • that the iPhone has in this photo.

  • But then the focus fall off on objects

  • that are close to the camera, look much better on the Pixel.

  • Yeah, it gets a little funky in this back row of flowers,

  • but I prefer it over the iPhone,

  • keeping all of the flowers in focus.

  • And then there's photos like this,

  • where yes, you can barely see my hand,

  • but on the Pixel photo, it's just way too blue.

  • And I think that my hand looks much more the color

  • that it should be, on the iPhone.

  • The color of the sky in the iPhone here,

  • is much more realistic.

  • Pixel went way too magenta.

  • The street scene looks a lot better with a bit more magenta,

  • and those bluer tones in the Pixel,

  • than it does with the warm tones of the iPhone.

  • At night, the Pixel definitely takes longer to take photos.

  • And you can see that in the way that these people

  • are blurry, in the Pixel's photo.

  • But I do really enjoy the blue sky that the Pixel preserved,

  • whereas the iPhone made all of this just black.

  • And then of course, there are those light reflections

  • that the iPhone is famous for.

  • And yes, the Pixel has them too, but a lot less of them.

  • And again, this photo took a lot longer

  • to take on the Pixel, but I really appreciate

  • how much detail it kept in the buildings.

  • Whereas on the iPhone,

  • it just looks like a black and white mess back here.

  • This one drives the point home quite well.

  • The contrast that the Pixel

  • kept in the trees is really nice,

  • but I prefer the contrast that the iPhone kept

  • on the people and this ledge right in front.

  • Okay, I'm coming close

  • to who I think I'd pick as the winner,

  • but I wanted to give all of you a chance to choose as well.

  • So I made a poll, I posted on my Twitter.

  • And a whole lot of you took it,

  • and we'll get to those results in a bit.

  • But first, I want to talk about how it feels

  • to use these cameras,

  • because you can't talk about a camera system

  • without talking about its hardware and its UI.

  • Let's head outside for that.

  • (chilled music)

  • When people ask me if they should buy a Pixel 6 Pro,

  • I ask them what they think of big phones,

  • because this phone is absolutely massive.

  • The Pixel's incredibly slippery back,

  • also does it no favors.

  • It weighs 210 grams and has a 6.7-inch screen,

  • that makes the iPhone 13 Pro feel mini

  • at 204 grams with a 6.1-inch screen.

  • And to be clear, I used to think

  • that the 13 Pro was way too big.

  • But now that I've used the Pixel 6, this thing feels mini.

  • All right, but now let's talk about camera software,

  • because both of these phones are missing one large feature,

  • if you ask me.

  • Let's talk Apple first.

  • As Dieter noted in his iPhone 13 Pro review,

  • there is this horrible, small icon in the camera's UI.

  • - This is yet another button on Apple's camera app,

  • which is getting increasingly complicated

  • and has an almost fractally expanding set

  • of different kinds of shooting states.

  • - So what Dieter's referring to

  • is this little button right up here, the small arrow.

  • The arrow button brings a whole new set of controls

  • to the bottom panel, replacing existing controls.

  • And it actually took me a few days

  • to even realize this was a button at all.

  • Not to mention, you can bring up the same controls

  • by swiping on the screen.

  • On the Pixel, it also has a downward arrow up top,

  • but it has a little settings wheel right next to it.

  • So it brings up a box that covers the camera's screen.

  • And that's where most of your settings are housed.

  • Each of these phones also have some fun features built in.

  • So on the iPhone, you have a macro mode

  • that uses the ultra-wide lens, and is quite stunning.

  • Then there's a cinematic video mode