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  • - Technology allows a scale and speed of opinion creation

  • that is extremely seductive to our brain.

  • Social media is the great amplifier of 'collective illusions.'

  • Collective illusion is a situation

  • where most people in a group

  • go along with an idea that they do not agree with

  • simply because they think

  • that most people in the group actually agree with it.

  • And as a result, the entire group

  • ends up doing things that almost nobody wants.

  • We have found collective illusions everywhere we look

  • from the kind of lives we wanna live,

  • to the country we wanna live in,

  • to the way we wanna treat each other,

  • and even what we expect out of our institutions.

  • Every time you go online, you are in a funhouse of mirrors.

  • The greatest strength of social media

  • is its 'democratizing tendency.'

  • We don't have to just look to elites

  • and a few news outlets to tell us about us.

  • We can actually communicate with each other.

  • But when we engage online, we tend to think

  • that we're interacting with a reasonable sample

  • of the actual population, but it's not true.

  • Close to 80% of all content on social media

  • is generated by about 10% of the users.

  • That 10% tends to be extreme on most social issues.

  • They are the vocal fringe.

  • When you have a vocal minority

  • that is perceived as the majority,

  • critical mass of us will actually either self-silence,

  • or we will actually go along to get along,

  • and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

  • This is how collective illusions form.

  • It's not terribly surprising that some of the first people

  • to start to use these tools to manipulate

  • were leaders who need consensus to conserve power.

  • - Venezuela. (speaks Spanish)

  • - An example of this is Nicolás Maduro,

  • the leader of Venezuela.

  • For a long time, it looked like, on social media,

  • that he had a pretty good beat

  • on the consensus of the people that he led.

  • So, almost everything that he would say,

  • stories that were written about him that were positive,

  • would be retweeted and shared,

  • and it looked like this represented some kind of consensus,

  • but it turned out a significant percentage

  • of his so-called "followers"

  • were actually what we call 'social bots.'

  • These are fake accounts that only exist

  • to retweet anything positive about him or that he said,

  • and, importantly, to attack the opposition.

  • When Twitter banned them,

  • the real consensus was with the opposition,

  • and that started to emerge and be retweeted

  • as more and more people recognized

  • that it was okay to say what they actually thought.

  • Social media is a free-for-all

  • in terms of who can shout the loudest,

  • and who can silence other people

  • in the name of masquerading as a majority

  • and manufacturing collective illusions.

  • Your willingness to conform

  • and your unwillingness to challenge

  • what you think the group believes

  • will actually contribute to leading the group astray.

  • The solution to our online life

  • is to get offline once in a while.

  • The most important thing you can do

  • is continue to have conversations with your family,

  • with your neighbors, with your community.

  • Don't carry that distortion over

  • into the way you treat people in real life.

  • - This series is brought to you by Stand Together,

  • a community of changemakers tackling our biggest challenges.

  • And to learn more about how

  • you can partner with Stand Together,

  • visit standtogether.org.

- Technology allows a scale and speed of opinion creation

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B1 US collective consensus social group wanna live venezuela

10% of people are ruining social media. Who are they? | Todd Rose for Big Think

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    たらこ posted on 2022/02/07
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