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  • Hello. This is 6 Minute English from

  • BBC Learning English. I'm Neil.

  • And I'm Georgina. When we think

  • about romantic Hollywood movies,

  • there have been some famous

  • examples over the years.

  • There are classic black-and-white

  • romance movies like 1951's,

  • A Streetcar Named Desire,

  • and the love affair between

  • Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid

  • Bergman in Casablanca, made in 1942.

  • You're really showing your age, Neil!

  • What about more recent movies like

  • When Harry met Sally or that famous

  • kiss between the characters

  • Jack and Rose in the film, Titanic.

  • In their time all these movies were

  • blockbusters - very popular and

  • successful films which sold millions

  • of cinema tickets. And this success

  • was often due to the on-screen

  • romance between

  • the leading actors.

  • In romantic movies, love is in

  • the air. Couples hold hands

  • and kiss, or in other words they

  • show intimacy - a close romantic,

  • or sexual relationship.

  • But while real couples kiss

  • and hold hands all the time,

  • actors in movies are just

  • pretending to be intimate,

  • and this can lead to problems.

  • Yes, whether it's a kiss or a

  • full-nudity sex scene, filming

  • intimate scenes for movies and

  • TV is a delicate business,

  • as we ll be finding out in

  • this programme.

  • But first, Georgina, I have a

  • quiz question for you.

  • Let me guess...

  • Another black-and-white

  • classic from the 1950s?

  • Yes - 1953 to be exact, which

  • was the year this movie won the

  • Oscar for Best Picture. The film

  • thrilled audiences with a famous

  • beach kiss between actors,

  • Burt Lancaster, and Deborah Kerr,

  • as they rolled around in the

  • waves - but what was the

  • movie? Was it:

  • a) West Side Story?, b) From

  • Here to Eternity?, or

  • c) Singin' in the Rain?

  • Well, 1953 was long before

  • I was born but I'll guess,

  • b) From Here to Eternity.

  • OK Georgina, we'll find out later

  • on if that s right. In 1953 an

  • on-screen kiss was still

  • considered a little naughty.

  • But by 2020 and the filming

  • of the BBC television dramas,

  • Normal People and I May

  • Destroy You, things had changed.

  • Nudity and sexual content had

  • become commonplace.

  • Ita O'Brien worked on both these

  • BBC dramas. She describes

  • herself as an 'intimacy coordinator' -

  • someone who helps actors and

  • directors plan and film

  • intimate scenes.

  • Listen as she gives her definition

  • of intimacy to BBC World Service

  • programme, The Conversation:

  • A hand hold, a stroke of the cheek,

  • you know, through to a hug, and

  • then obviously, right the way

  • through to intimate content -

  • it might be familial content of

  • an adult to a child; it could be

  • the content of perhaps a medical

  • procedure, someone having a

  • mammogram, or it could be

  • right the way through to intimacy,

  • simulated sexual content.

  • Ita's definition of intimacy is

  • very wide, including hugging

  • and stroking - gently touching

  • someone in a pleasurable way.

  • It also includes simulated sex.

  • Movie actors aren't really

  • having sex, they're simulating it -

  • pretending to do something so

  • that it looks real but is not.

  • Just like dance sequences in

  • musicals, intimate movie scenes

  • are planned and choreographed

  • beforehand so that the director,

  • film crew and, above all, the

  • actors are comfortable with

  • what's being filmed.

  • But recent scandals about the

  • on-set behaviour of some British

  • and American film stars have

  • highlighted how delicate

  • a balance this is.

  • Here's Ita O Brien again talking

  • to BBC World Service's, The

  • Conversation, about the different

  • ways that intimate scenes are

  • filmed on either side of the

  • Atlantic, in Britain and the US.

  • With actors from the US, what they

  • do have, what they put in

  • place is that with each and

  • every intimate scene we create

  • a nudity / simulated sex waiver,

  • for each and every scene and I

  • actually really like that way of

  • working. In the UK actors are

  • asked to sign a nudity clause

  • and generally that's an overall,

  • for the whole of a production.

  • British actors sign only one

  • document with a nudity clause

  • to cover the whole film. But in

  • the US, actors sign a waiver -

  • a legal document that allows or

  • prevents an action that is

  • different from how things

  • are usually done.

  • Ita thinks it's better if the actors

  • agree to each and every scene -

  • and she uses the phrase, 'each

  • and every' because it emphasises

  • that she means every single one.

  • In this way there is no confusion

  • about what should or shouldn't

  • happen on set, leaving the director

  • and actors free to make dramatic

  • and romantic blockbusters.

  • You mean like that famous

  • beach scene, kissing and

  • rolling in the waves, Neil?

  • Ah, you mean my quiz question

  • when I asked you: What was the

  • name of the 1953 movie

  • featuring a famous beach kiss

  • between movie stars Burt

  • Lancaster and Deborah Kerr?

  • What did you say, Georgina?

  • I said it was b) From Here to Eternity.

  • Which is the right answer! Well done,

  • Georgina - so you do like classic

  • black-and-white movies after all!

  • Not really, Neil, but I remember my

  • grandad watching it! OK, let's recap

  • the vocabulary from this

  • programme about intimacy -

  • a close romantic or

  • sexual relationship.

  • A blockbuster is a very popular

  • and successful movie or a

  • book that sells many copies.

  • If you stroke someone's face,

  • you touch it gently in

  • a pleasurable way.

  • To simulate means to do

  • or make something that

  • looks real but is not.

  • In the US, a waiver is a legal

  • document to either allow or

  • prevent something being done

  • in a different way from usual.

  • And you can use the phrase,

  • each and every to emphasise

  • that you mean every single

  • one of something.

  • That's