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  • Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.comLet's travel together.  

  • Do you like to travel? Do you wish that you  could travel more? Well, if you have ever  

  • visited another country, you know that English  is essential or at least very helpful when you  

  • travel. So, I have some good news. Today, you are  going to learn 50 important phrases for travel.  

  • You'll learn how to plan for a trip, how to talk  about directions and transportation, how to talk  

  • at the airport and at a hotel. And finally, how  to tell someone about a trip that you just took

  • I know that 50 expressions is a lot. So, to  help you, I've created a free PDF worksheet  

  • that you can download with the link in the  description. Never forget what you've learned,  

  • review everything and answer Vanessa's Challenge  question at the end of the PDF worksheet

  • Let's get started with how to  plan or book a trip in English.  

  • Where would you like to go? Excellent starter  question. Where would you like to go? Also,  

  • you can answer this by saying, "I've never been  to Rio de Janeiro. I've never been to Rome.  

  • I've never been to Tokyo." Excellent phrase. "We should book tickets now." This verb, to book,  

  • means to reserve. We're not talking about  something that you read. This is the noun,  

  • a book. This is talking about reserving something.  "We should book tickets now because it's a  

  • popular destination, so let's book tickets." "I hate making plans. Let's just do something  

  • spur of the moment." Spur of the moment  means without plan, something spontaneous.  

  • Well, you need to book tickets to go to another  country, but maybe when you get there, you don't  

  • want to have every hour planned. You like to do  things spur of the moment. "Oh, there's a great  

  • park. Let's go there. Oh, that's a cool museumLet's go there." This is spur of the moment

  • A similar phrase you can use is, "We decided  that we'll just go wherever the wind blows us."  

  • Maybe the wind will blow me to that museumMaybe the wind will blow me to that restaurant.  

  • I don't know. This has the same idea as spur of  the moment. It's not planned. It's spontaneous

  • Maybe you are the opposite kind of person. You  might say, "We need to make a reservation."  

  • This is a great phrase to know: to makereservation. You can make a reservation at a  

  • popular restaurant, you can make a reservation  at a hotel, you can make a reservation for a  

  • seat at a concert. There's a lot of different  things that you can make a reservation for

  • When you go to a museum or somewhere similaryou might ask, "Do you have an audio guide?  

  • Do you have an audio guide?" This is actuallygreat way to improve your English. Because if you  

  • listen to an audio guide in Englishas you're walking around the museum,  

  • I bet you are going to learn a ton of new  vocabulary, some great expressions for describing  

  • what you're seeing. This is an excellent way to  enjoy something, but also learn some English.  

  • You can ask, "Do you have an audio guide?" When you go somewhere, you can ask, "Do you  

  • accept cash or credit card? Do you accept cash or  credit card?" Depending on the country you're in,  

  • they might prefer one option instead of the otherAnd we often use the word cash to talk about  

  • physical dollar bills or the physical  money of the place that you're visiting.  

  • "Do you accept cash or credit card? Because I only  have a credit card. I don't have any cash with me.  

  • If you need cash, then I got to come back." You might ask, "What are the hours for the  

  • museum? What are the hours for the tour? What are  the hours for some kind of event or place?" It's  

  • a great question to ask, "When are you open?" What  are the hours for something that you want to see

  • Our final question under this first category of  planning or booking your vacation is an excellent  

  • question, "What should I pack for? What should  I pack for?" Well, of course, for vacation. Now,  

  • this question has another meaning. It meanswant to know what kind of activities we'll do,  

  • what the weather is going to be. I want  to know, do I need to pack a swimsuit?  

  • Do I need to pack a winter coat? What shouldpack for? That means what should I prepare for

  • This is really helpful as you're trying to  fit everything inside your small suitcase,  

  • this always happens to me, and you really need  to decide, "Okay, what do I need to pack four?  

  • Okay, I don't need three winter sweatersIt's probably going to be not too cold.  

  • I'll just bring something else." You  can ask, "What do I need to pack for?" 

  • The next phrases have to do with transportation  and directions. I want to help you not be lost in  

  • a foreign place with no words to say to help  yourself. So, let's talk about 10 important  

  • phrases for transportation and directions. The first one is a great question. You can  

  • ask someone else or they might ask youif you look really lost, you might hear,  

  • "Where are you headed?" This is often reduced to  simply, "Where ya headed?" We cut out the verb  

  • are and we reduced you to ya, "Where ya headedWhere are you headed?" If you look really lost,  

  • someone might say, "Hey, where ya headedCan I help you?" This great verb, to head,  

  • means the direction that you're going inSo, you're going somewhere. "I'm headed to  

  • the store. I'm headed to the doctor's office.  I'm headed to the metro station. Where is it?" 

  • So, someone might ask you, "Where ya headed?"  Or, if you see someone who's lost, you can ask  

  • this too, "Excuse me. Can you tell me how to  get to the metro station? Excuse me, can you  

  • tell me how to get to the subway station?" It's  great to introduce a lot of these questions with,  

  • "Excuse me," because you're interrupting someone  else and really it is the easiest way to be polite  

  • in a simple way. "Excuse me, can you tell me how  to get to the subway station? Excuse me, can you  

  • tell me how to get to the museum?" To wherever  you'd like to go. "Excuse me, how far is it to the  

  • airport? Excuse me, how far is it to the airport?" You might ask this to your bus driver as you're  

  • getting on the bus to go to the airport and you're  worried about missing your flight. You'd want to  

  • know, is it going to take 30 minutes? Is it going  to take two hours? Is it going to take 10 minutes?  

  • "Excuse me, how far is it to the  airport?" And then they'll tell you,  

  • "Oh, don't worry. It's just going to take  10 minutes. We'll be there pretty soon." 

  • I don't know about you, but I have had many  experiences looking for a bus stop and being  

  • so lost. Sometimes bus stops are not obvious. It's  just a little sign or maybe it's just a pole and  

  • everyone knows where you should go, except  for you because you're not from that area.  

  • So, this is a great question. You can ask,  "Excuse me, which way to the bus stop?  

  • Excuse me, which way to the bus stopThis way, that way, over here, back  

  • there?" "Excuse me, which way to the bus stop?" "Excuse me, where's the closest ATM?" This phrase,  

  • ATM, stands for Automated Teller Machine. And it's  just that machine, some other countries call these  

  • cash points where you can put your debit card  or credit card into the machine and you can get  

  • cash. So, if you happen to go to a store  that requires cash, but you have no cash,  

  • you can ask this question, "Oh, do you  know where's the closest ATM?" "Excuse me,  

  • where's the closest ATM. I need to get some cash."  Great question. And the word ATM is most commonly  

  • used in the US. Some other countries might use  other expressions, but if you're visiting the US,  

  • ATM is an excellent word to use. Are you hungry? You can ask,  

  • "Is there a grocery store nearby? I don't  want to go to another expensive restaurant.  

  • I just want to get some simple food that I can  cook back at my place. Is there a grocery store  

  • nearby?" Notice the pronunciation of this  word. There's two pronunciations. Actually,  

  • you can say grocery, grocery with an S, groceryBut you're more likely to hear, at least that's  

  • what I say, you're more likely to hear it grocerylike an SH. Grocery, grocery, grocery store.  

  • "Is there a grocery store nearby?" Great question. "When is the next train? When's the next train?"  

  • If the board with all of the train information is  so confusing, just ask someone, "Excuse me, when's  

  • the next train?" Great. If still confused, you can  ask, "When does the next... leave? When does the  

  • next bus leave? When does the next train leaveWhen does the next flight leave? I need to go  

  • now." When does the next... leave? Great question. Will the departure be on time? Maybe you come from  

  • a country where things are always on time and  you expect it to be on time, but you realize  

  • in the country that you're in right nowthings are not on time or maybe the opposite  

  • and you need to know, "Excuse me, will the  departure be on time?" That's important

  • Our final phrase for transportation and directions  is actually kind of a two for one. Let's imagine  

  • that you're in a taxi, sometimes we call thosecab, and you're at your destination, but maybe the  

  • taxi driver is looking for, "Oh, where shoulddrop them?" You can use this phrase, "You can drop  

  • me here. You can drop me here." It doesn't mean  that they're holding you and dropping you. This is  

  • shortened from, "Drop me off." To drop off someone  means that you're driving them and they leave.  

  • You're dropping them off. Maybe you drop off your  kids at school every morning. This is a great  

  • phrase to use in a taxi, "You can drop me here." Or if you want to make it even shorter, you can  

  • just say, "This is me." You see your hotel out  the window or you see the place you need to go,  

  • you can just say, "Oh, excuse me. This is me."  Well, this is you here now. This just means,  

  • "This is where I need to go." You'll often  hear this in a taxi and you can use it too

  • The next 10 important phrases for travel  will help you to talk at the airport.  

  • They'll help you to speak, but also they'll  help you to understand, because a lot of these  

  • phrases and questions, you will get asked. A  lot of things get asked when you're traveling,  

  • when you're entering a new country. And I want to  make sure that you can understand completely. So,  

  • let's start with the first one. You get to the airport. You look around,  

  • there's so many people, so many things going  on, you feel lost. Well, you can easily ask,  

  • "Excuse me, where's the Delta counter? Excuse  me, where's the Delta check-in?" Both of these  

  • questions are great for finding where can I go  for my airline? If you know what your airline is,  

  • and I hope you do, you can just insert that.  "Excuse me, where's the American Airlines counter?  

  • Excuse me, where's the American Airlines  check-in?" Excellent question to get started

  • After you arrive at your gate, you want to  make sure that you don't miss your flight.  

  • Even though you're there, you're so close, but  maybe you need to go down the hall and get some  

  • food or go to the bathroom. You need to ask,  "Excuse me, when will the plane be boarding?  

  • When will the plane be boarding?" And that meanswhen will the people be going on the airplane?  

  • When will the people board? "Excuse me, when will  the plane be boarding?" If they tell you, "Oh,  

  • we'll board in 30 minutes." Cool. You have plenty  of time. Go get some food, go to the bathroom,  

  • stretch a little bit. Excellent question. If you've ever been at the airport, you know you  

  • get asked lots of questions. One of those might  be, "What's your flight number?" Especially if  

  • you're lost and you're not sure where to go. And  you say, "Excuse me, I'm lost. Can you help me?"  

  • They might ask, "Oh, what's your flight number?"  And they'll look either at your tickets or they'll  

  • look on your phone or they'll look on the board  and they'll be able to help you not be so lost

  • When you're checking in, you will be asked,  "Do you have your passport? Do you have  

  • your passport?" You might be asked a more direct  question. They might just say, "Passport, please.  

  • Passport, please." And as long as you're familiar  with the word passport, you know, "Aha, I need to  

  • give them my passport." Just a little note. Make  sure that you always get your passport back

  • When I first traveled to another  country, I didn't know this.  

  • And I thought that you were supposed  to give them your passport and they  

  • kept it until you got on the flight. I don't  know. I was a young traveler. I had no idea.  

  • So, make sure that you get your passport after  you check in, when you enter your flight

  • When you go through securityyou'll hear, "Boarding pass, please.  

  • Boarding pass, please." Or when you enter  the airplane, they might ask you this,  

  • "Boarding pass, please." And that's the piece of  paper that the airline has printed out, and it has  

  • all of your information, your flight number, your  seat, all of this stuff is on your boarding pass

  • You'll also hear the question,  "Are you checking any luggage?"  

  • Or, "Do you have anything to check? Are  you checking any luggage?" It doesn't mean  

  • I'm checking luggage. No, this means that  you are giving the airline a big suitcase  

  • and they will take it and put it  under the airplane. If you do this,  

  • maybe you might need to pay extra. They need to  probably weigh your suitcase. So, this is a good  

  • question that you will be asked, "Are you checking  any luggage?" Or, "Do you have anything to check?" 

  • When you are returning home from your wonderful  travels, you might be asked at the airport,  

  • "Do you have anything to declare?" To  declare. Usually this means to speak,  

  • "I declare that it's a beautiful day today," kind  of old fashioned English to use it like that.  

  • But in a modern sense, we use this at the  airport to mean, if you bought anything,  

  • especially anything expensive on your travelswell, you might need to pay a specific tax  

  • to bring it back to your home country. Somake sure that you know, so that they don't  

  • see something in your suitcase and say, "Why did  you not declare this $500 million diamond ring?"  

  • So, you will be asked, "Do you have anything  to declare?" And you can say yes or no