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  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei

  • And me, Roy. Have you seen Rob's

  • new video on social media?

  • Yes, it's amazing!

  • He has charm and style - he just has...

  • Ooof!!!

  • Yes! Oomph! Rob has oomph and charm -

  • not as much as me of course,

  • but he has some! Wow, Roy! For once

  • you actually got the correct word! Oomph!

  • I didn't say oomph - I said ooof!

  • I was complaining because I hurt my back

  • earlier putting your cases in your car

  • for you to go on your workcation.

  • Well, one can never be too prepared

  • when going to the beach. Besides, I need

  • lots of different outfits for when

  • I take pictures. My photos have to have real...

  • Oomph - yes, I get it. Your photos need to have

  • energy and be exciting.

  • Exactly! Well, let's talk more about

  • my oomph right after these examples.

  • The business owner showed real oomph

  • in her presentation when she was

  • pitching the idea.

  • I really like the way Eric speaks - he has

  • real energy and oomph.

  • The dancer showed real oomph in his

  • performance - an energy I haven't seen

  • in a long time!

  • You're listening to The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English,

  • and we're talking about the word 'oomph'.

  • If someone or something has 'oomph',

  • they have real energy and excitement.

  • Some people argue that it is important

  • to have real oomph when making

  • presentations. I'm really good at

  • talking to a room full of people,

  • which means I must have real oomph!

  • You're clearly mistaken! I am the one

  • with the oomph! I could sell

  • anything to anyone.

  • Well, if I bought what you were selling,

  • I could resell it for double the price -

  • that's how much oomph I've got!

  • No, Roy. You don't have oomph.

  • You have a puppy-like charm.

  • It's OK to be envious of my oomph!

  • Puppy-like?! I don't chew slippers

  • or chase sticks! I have oomph! Energy!

  • Excitement! People have told me that!

  • And who said that?

  • Rob. But ironically, he said it when

  • he hurt his back helping me with your cases.

  • Well, I think we all know what he really said!

  • Bye, Roy.

  • Bye.

  • Hello, and welcome to

  • The English We Speak with me, Feifei

  • and me, Roy. I am so hungry!

  • I haven't had anything to eat all day!

  • Where are the pizzas?

  • What are you talking about?

  • You sent me a message saying

  • you had lots of pizzas, so

  • I'm ready to eat!

  • No Roy, I said I had real pizzazz!

  • I was saying how glamorous I was.

  • Pizzazz is spelt P-I-Z-Z-A-Z-Z!

  • It doesn't look anything like 'pizzas'.

  • I thought you were writing 'pizzas'

  • with extra 'Z's to be cool!

  • Now it makes more sense!

  • Pizzazz relates to be being glamorous

  • or having vitality.

  • Anyway, I would never buy you pizzas!

  • I have too much pizzazz too eat pizzas.

  • If I were feeling generous,

  • I would buy you a glass of water

  • from the tap.

  • Errr... but that's free.

  • Exactly! Well, why don't you go and eat

  • while we listen to these examples?

  • Have you seen the latest episode?

  • That new actress has real pizzazz.

  • I think the colour scheme on your painting

  • is so vibrant. It has real pizzazz.

  • The moment I listened to the song

  • for the first time,

  • I couldn't stop dancing to it!

  • The tune has real energy and pizzazz.

  • You're listening to The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English,

  • and we're talking about the

  • expression 'pizzazz'. If someone or

  • something has 'pizzazz', they are

  • glamorous or have real energy.

  • Roy, what are you eating?

  • I'm just about to eat a slice of pizza -

  • I am so hungry!

  • I would offer you a slice

  • but I know you don't think it has real pizzazz.

  • Well, I could make an exception this time.

  • Go on, I'll have a slice of your pizza.

  • But I only have one slice.

  • You should give it to me.

  • I'll tell everyone how much pizzazz you have!

  • Oh, that's really kind of you Feifei,

  • but I don't need you to say that.

  • I already have pizzazz!

  • You can see that in that picture of me

  • dressed like a flamingo on social media.

  • I'm not sure if that's what

  • I would call glamorous, Roy.

  • So, are you really not going to

  • give me your pizza?

  • No.

  • Well, I'm going to make

  • my own pizza then - and it will have

  • more pizzazz than yours! Bye.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak

  • with me, Feifei

  • and me, Roy.

  • In this programme, we have a word that is

  • used to say that something is amazing or extremely good.

  • Speaking of which, have you seen

  • that new blockbuster that everyone's talking about -

  • 'Unicorns Eat Bananas in the Stars'?

  • What kind of title is that?!

  • That film sounds awful!

  • It's not! 'Unicorns Eat Bananas in the Stars is fire!

  • Fire? The unicorns that eat bananas in the stars

  • are on fire?! What is this film about?

  • No, Roy! Don't be silly, the banana eating unicorns

  • aren't on fire! That would be ridiculous.

  • I said the film is fire. I mean that the film is amazing!

  • Ahhh of course! We use 'fire' to describe

  • something that is really good! For example,

  • your T-shirt is fire, Feifei!

  • Oh thanks, Roy! I bought it this week!

  • It's official merchandise for the film!

  • Anyway, let's listen to these examples

  • Have you checked out my new phone? It's fire.

  • It can do so many cool things!

  • I went to a concert to see 'Rob's Rolling Biscuits'

  • last night. Their new song is fire.

  • That new series everyone is talking about

  • is fire! It's got dragons, zombies and

  • vampires in it. I love it!

  • This is The English We Speak from BBC Learning

  • English and we're talking about the word 'fire',

  • which is used to say that something

  • is amazing.

  • I might have to go tonight and watch the film

  • at the cinema.

  • You definitely should. It's straight fire!

  • We sometimes put the word 'straight'

  • in front of 'fire'. Straight here means 'very'.

  • So I probably should have said your t-shirt

  • is straight fire, then.

  • Only if that's what you really think.

  • You haven't even seen the film yet!

  • What about my T-shirt? Do you think it's fire?

  • Honestly, no. It looks like it needs to be

  • put in a fire. You should just burn it.

  • The film on your T-shirt is not fire!

  • That film is terrible.

  • OK, maybe I'll buy a new one today.

  • Bye, Roy.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak. I'm Feifei

  • And hi, I'm Rob. Hey, Feifei.

  • Err, why the long face?

  • What's wrong with my face?

  • I mean, why are you looking so... grumpy?

  • Grumpy!?

  • Yes... moody.

  • Moody! There is nothing wrong!

  • This is my normal face. Why are you

  • throwing so many insults at me?

  • Oh come on, you do look

  • a bit bad-tempered.

  • I'm not bad-tempered.

  • But I'm getting angry now.

  • Oh great! Then I can describe you as 'mardy'.

  • Mardy? I hope that's not another insult.

  • It's not an insult - but 'mardy' does

  • describe someone who is in a bad mood,

  • moans a lot and gets annoyed easily.

  • So, thanks for demonstrating that, Feifei!

  • My pleasure! Let's hear some examples...

  • There are no desks for Pedro to work at today

  • so he has to sit on the sofa.

  • No wonder he is so mardy.

  • My boyfriend is always so mardy.

  • Nothing seems to please him.

  • Maybe I shouldn't have

  • come home drunk last night!

  • Steer clear of me today.

  • I only had four hours sleep last night

  • and I'm really mardy today.

  • This is The English We Speak from

  • BBC Learning English and we're talking

  • about the word 'mardy', which describes

  • someone in a bad mood. As I was saying, Rob,

  • I am not mardy!

  • If you say so, Feifei.

  • But I know something to make you mardy.

  • Oh yes?

  • You're going to have to record

  • this programme again.

  • What? Again? Why?

  • You forgot to explain that 'mardy'

  • also describes someone who is

  • sulky or grumpy.

  • Hmm, you're just being awkward.

  • I'm not going to start this programme again.

  • I'm too busy.

  • Right, I'm off to get a coffee. Goodbye!

  • Who's mardy now? Or he is just acting? Bye!

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I'm Roy!

  • I'm really impressed, Roy.

  • Neil said you have real clout!

  • What?! You mean that Neil wants to

  • hit me? Is he angry with me?

  • Oh, no, Roy. 'Clout' can mean 'to hit someone'

  • as a verb, but it can also be used

  • as a noun to mean

  • 'your influence or fame on social media'.

  • Neil was talking about how much

  • clout you have with all your followers.

  • Ahh... that kind of clout. But I don't

  • have that many followers.

  • Sometimes people get my name confused with

  • Rob! It's Rob who has the clout!

  • He has lots of followers and

  • some real influence on social media.

  • He's using it to sell biscuits

  • his mum made.

  • Hmmm! I'm going to try and find

  • some more followers while we listen

  • to some examples.

  • Esmeralda has some real clout

  • on social media. She has so many

  • followers who watch all her vlogs.

  • We've decided to hire an influencer

  • with real clout to help us launch

  • our new project.

  • Derek used his clout to sell the

  • new perfume to his millions of followers.

  • This is The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English,

  • and we're talking about the informal

  • expression 'clout', which means

  • your level of fame or influence

  • on social media. It can also be used

  • in another situation, can't it?

  • That's right!

  • It can also be used in business or politics