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  • Hello and welcome back to

  • The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I'm Rob.

  • Have I told you about

  • the competition that I've entered, Feifei?

  • No, Rob.

  • What is it?

  • It's a singing competition!

  • You have to perform a popular song

  • from your favourite band -

  • and I'm going to win!

  • You?

  • Are you going to win?

  • No offence, Rob, but I've heard your

  • singing voice, and, well, I'm not sure...

  • What are you trying to say, Feifei?

  • All I'm saying is that

  • there is a fat chance

  • of you winning the competition!

  • Right! So first you make fun

  • of my singing and now

  • you're calling me fat!

  • How cheeky!

  • Oh Rob, no. I'm not calling you fat:

  • I'm saying that the likelihood of

  • you winning the competition is very small.

  • Rob: Oh right, yes.

  • 'Fat chance' is an English phrase

  • to say something is not very likely -

  • I remember now.

  • Right, while you calm down,

  • let's hear some other examples

  • of this phrase.

  • I bought a lottery ticket for tonight's

  • draw - and these are my lucky numbers!

  • I'm definitely going to win!

  • Fat chance!

  • I hope it's warm this weekend -

  • I want to go fishing.

  • Well, fat chance of that.

  • It's the middle of November!

  • I auditioned for a role in a movie, but there

  • is fat chance of me getting the role - I saw

  • loads of famous actors auditioning too.

  • This is The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English and we're

  • talking about the phrase 'fat chance'.

  • This is a noun phrase that means

  • a small chance, or possibility,

  • of something happening.

  • It can be used in a full sentence,

  • and also as a standalone phrase.

  • For example, when Rob said

  • he was going to win the competition,

  • I could have just said 'fat chance'!

  • Hey!

  • I think I've got

  • a really good chance!

  • I've been practising hard and

  • I've even taken a few lessons!

  • OK, Rob.

  • Well... good luck -

  • I suppose...

  • Well, Feifei, when I win

  • the £5000 prize money,

  • there's fat chance of you getting any of it.

  • Wait, £5000?

  • Rob, hold on!

  • I didn't mean it!

  • Thanks for joining us - I've got to go

  • and apologise to Rob.

  • Hopefully he'll

  • share his winnings!

  • Bye!

  • Hi Neil.

  • Good weekend?

  • Do anything nice?

  • Hi Feifei!

  • Actually, I stayed in and

  • watched TV.

  • Football?

  • No, I watched this marvellous

  • programme from Norway.

  • Oh, one of those police dramas?

  • Theyre great!

  • Actually, believe it or not, the entire film

  • was just the view from the front of

  • a train, all the way from one city to another.

  • It was seven hours long.

  • Seven hours?!

  • That’s all that happened?

  • No people?

  • No police?

  • No nothing?

  • Just the view from the train.

  • It was such a relaxing journey.

  • They call it 'slow TV'.

  • Ahh, yes.

  • I’ve heard of that.

  • Wasn't there one on a boat too?

  • Isn’t it a bit boring?

  • Well, it’s not for everyone.

  • But my life is so busy,

  • I just like to slow down now and again.

  • I’m still not convinced.

  • Anyway,

  • let’s hear some more examples

  • about this slow TV.

  • It’s our phrase on

  • The English We Speak.

  • Michaela's company specialises in

  • making slow TV.

  • She says business is great right now!

  • I recently discovered slow TV.

  • My friends think it's really dull,

  • but I find it helps

  • clear my head after a stressful day.

  • What are you watching?

  • It looks just like a fireplace

  • with a big piece of wood burning.

  • It is! Isn’t slow TV fantastic?

  • It takes about four hours

  • for the wood to burn completely.

  • You're listening to The English We Speak

  • from BBC Learning English.

  • The expression we're looking at

  • in this programme is 'slow TV'.

  • So Neil, is this what youll be doing

  • with your free time from now on?

  • Watching slow TV?

  • No, I’ve got an even better idea

  • for this weekend.

  • You know that oak tree I planted?

  • Err, yes.

  • I’m going to film it.

  • And make my

  • very own slow TV!

  • Then you can watch

  • my tree grow, any time you like.

  • Honestly, Neil.

  • I don’t think so.

  • Maybe this will be the next big thing

  • in slow TV.

  • I could call itslow tree-V. Get it?

  • I think what you need is to take

  • a long, slow walk outside.

  • Then you can admire

  • all the trees you like!

  • Just you wait, Feifei!

  • This will be the slowest TV ever -

  • oak trees take around 30 years to grow.

  • Good luck Neil! See you in 30 years.

  • I’ll stick to police dramas in the meantime.

  • Bye.

  • Hello and welcome to The English We Speak.

  • I'm Feifei.

  • And I’m Rob!

  • Hey, Feifei, did you know theyre looking for a new

  • team leader to manage and motivate our team?

  • Oooh, a promotion!

  • And you think I should apply for it?

  • No, no!

  • I was going to ask if you think

  • I’d be good for the position?

  • Well... well, youre sometimes friendly

  • and you like to chat.

  • Great.

  • Well, the job description

  • says that they want someone withsoft skills

  • and that means 'the ability to communicate

  • and work well with other people'.

  • I'm basically a team player.

  • You are a team player?

  • Well, Rob, youre certainlysoft

  • not very strict

  • so nobody would listen to you!

  • Oh, well, well see about that.

  • We are going to hear some examples,

  • and no arguing!

  • Weve got to build a team that works well together,