Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Good afternoon.

  • Good morning.

  • Good evening.

  • Not good night though.

  • Um, I'm really going to tell you something.

  • Really.

  • I am terrible at spelling.

  • Are you really, really terrible at spelling in english too.

  • I am.

  • Um the reason why is because our pronunciation is completely different from how we write things and this makes a terrible problem, especially if you're studying for very important tests like aisles or any other written tests that you need for your school.

  • It is terrible.

  • But I have a method that I want to share with you and it's helped me pass the spelling tests, it's helped me graduate university and it's helped me become, You are # one English teacher.

  • I'm Ronnie and I'm gonna teach you how to spell these terrible, awful words that I always felt wrong.

  • But let's start with these.

  • I was looking on the internet, you know that place, the internet and there's a list, 25, words that native english speakers spell wrong all the time.

  • So don't don't be discouraged if you think your spelling is terrible because you're learning a language because guess what?

  • Native speakers can't even spell it correctly.

  • So you're good but watch my tips.

  • So this is what I do.

  • Um and I'll tell you how I got this method.

  • I look forwards inside the words that helped me remember to spell the words.

  • Let me show you what I mean.

  • We have this word.

  • Unfortunately.

  • Now even the pronunciation is weird.

  • It looks like on Fortuyn a ete Lien for two knee I easily and then we just come and say unfortunately?

  • yeah.

  • And then you have the job of trying to remember how to spell this word.

  • So let's look at it.

  • What words can you see inside the word?

  • Okay, first of all I see the prefix on.

  • So in english just means not.

  • Okay then.

  • I see four.

  • Okay.

  • I almost see, I always see fortune but there's no E.

  • So that will really mess me up.

  • But then I see the past tense of the verb To eat eight.

  • So I can remember on four T U N eight lee.

  • So I've got words inside.

  • And this is the problem with native speak with native speakers when we try and write things is we mix these up.

  • We usually omit the E.

  • We could put another vowel here instead of you.

  • So always look for words inside words.

  • I had this problem in grade two and I had a wonderful grade two teacher mrs it'll I don't never know what happened to her.

  • Hi, if you're watching thank you.

  • Um and when I was eight years old I could not spell the word about properly.

  • I probably felt it.

  • Uh vote Mhm.

  • Because that's how it sounds.

  • I remember my great to teachers sitting me down a little desk and saying Ronnie, you are going to write this word about 100 times and for an eight year old, that's a lot.

  • Even for I'm not eight year old, it's a lot.

  • So I sat there with my pencil and I probably spelt it wrong 100 times and she said it's wrong, you gotta do it again.

  • So I realized that there is you, why is there you why don't you say to you?

  • So it's about so in my little seven year old brain I thought oh no no no but there's an out so I can remember it's a B C D E F out ab out wow.

  • Then I proudly wrote it 100 times and I showed my teacher and I think I got it.

  • I will always remember how to spell this word because I realized this pattern ID AJ anna was a genius now I use it.

  • Okay so what where do you see in this or combinations of words?

  • I see again.

  • Oh there's a double M here but this is a prefix.

  • So we're gonna look at the beginning of the word and see these prefixes.

  • Then we have meat.

  • Mm Okay.

  • Oh I get to eat something again.

  • So imedi.

  • Uh there's the, I watch out for the I Okay, so prefix mead I Atlee.

  • Okay this is getting fun.

  • Can you see a word in this word problem we have in english is the double letters right?

  • But most of the time when you have a double letter it's because it is a prefect.

  • Okay so when I look at this word I see two PS and I say a parent oh I see a parent in here.

  • Okay so we have to remember that parent is in the word but we also have to add an extra P.

  • Before it.

  • That'll nail the double P.

  • There.

  • Apparently I can spell this word now.

  • Uh There's ease.

  • There's IEA's there's sees there's lots of ends.

  • Well this sounds crazy convenience.

  • Con.

  • Okay con good.

  • Wien no vain.

  • No I don't know.

  • This one's hard convenience.

  • Mm.

  • Yeah just memorize this one because I don't have a technique convenience.

  • There's a a little rhyme we'd like to say.

  • We say I before E.

  • Except after C.

  • But there's so many exceptions to that rule that really doesn't worked like that.

  • But you can remember I before E.

  • Except after C.

  • But that means because there's a C.

  • And then it would be like this so watch out for that one.

  • Nor to see there.

  • So I what about this one?

  • I always spell this like this separate S.

  • E.

  • C.

  • I can't even do that.

  • S.

  • E.

  • P.

  • E.

  • R A T separate.

  • Yeah.

  • No no apparently except pa.

  • Right so um excuse me could you please step pop rate this for me?

  • Hmm.

  • So in this word I can see the word par.

  • This is our problem areas.

  • So I remember sep par and then if you wanted to you could sit another eight here but as long as you get the A.

  • R.

  • Not the er you're okay.

  • Oh this word so many vowels.

  • What are you guys doing down here in their season?

  • S is what's this?

  • I remember this guy likes, I like science.

  • So I go conscious conscious.

  • That's how you should spell it conscious.

  • And then you know there's a C.

  • I remember the beginning of khan and then the science and then us con science us conscious.

  • Good.

  • This one's fun.

  • I can see this in two ways.

  • First of all I can see city spent with an S instead of a C.

  • And I also see hm real, which is the Portuguese and spanish word for river.

  • So I see a rio in here there's a river.

  • I see curio, which could be a fun word to as well.

  • But so I think rio atrocity and the problem lies within here getting the I.

  • And the O in there.

  • This one.

  • Oh God, it's another, it's another one with the E.

  • And the L.

  • Y.

  • Sometimes you put the E in, sometimes you don't.

  • So I would look at this and go the thin, oh no.

  • Oh look look look there is the wonderful slang, american spelling of the word night.

  • So def Finn.

  • And then aight definitely if you say it like that, you remember it like that to spell it.

  • But don't say it like that on the exam, definitely.

  • Just remember there's a night in there.

  • He's your knight in shining armor.

  • This one.

  • Look at this.

  • So many of these guys have double consonants, double letters.

  • Oh, how are you going to do this?

  • This one we have to ours because again this is a prefix.

  • Look at Oh, my sister is here to help me.

  • So I am re cyst sister table.

  • Oh, this is when we hit another mistake.

  • Sometimes we have able sometimes we have cable.

  • So to help you with this one, I would make a chart of the words like this.

  • I would make words that end and able and where does it end and able.

  • If your pronunciation is up to speed, which means it's very good.

  • You could even hear the difference in it.

  • But if you don't know how to say it.

  • The spelling is harder because we say here's this table but we say avail able.

  • So that actually makes sense.

  • But you got to make sure your pronunciation is okay.

  • This one wow, wow wow, wow.

  • There's, there's more vowels, so main.

  • Oh, Ken, name 10 and then and Maintenance, maintenance.

  • So I think of a main and then number 10 and then I just remember the ants part here.

  • This word.

  • I know.

  • Why do we have the a something's a veil abul sometimes there and in table which is fun.

  • But this one doesn't have a table inside.

  • So you're going to just break this year avail vegetables are really good punk band too.

  • If you ever knew that one.

  • Mm.

  • So double consonants just remember double double double C, double S.

  • And I like the way that, that some people um, I have learned the double consonants because I have learned to say a C C E S S I B L E.

  • But some people say a double c D E double S.

  • I'm like, wow, I like that.

  • You can make a song.

  • Like I got the next one I got to see and I got double M.

  • And I got a double what?

  • T.

  • And I got a double E.

  • Diandra doubling up on these.

  • So if you can make little rhymes, double M, double T, double E, it's going to help you because I would write this committee committee.

  • He had like this committee.

  • So if something is irresistible means you cannot resist it.

  • It means you need it like chocolates.

  • If someone, hey Ronnie, would you like some chocolate?

  • Like Yeah, I do, I do.

  • I've eaten 100 kg of chocolate already but I cannot resist the chocolate.

  • I need it.

  • I need it maintenance.

  • We do this in a car.

  • If your car is old, it's not broken.

  • But the mechanic likes you to bring it to them so they can charge you money to maintain your car.

  • That means charge you extra money to keep your car in good running order.

  • You maintain something maintenance available means that you have free time or you can do something um, accessible.

  • We have the word innit?

  • Access.

  • But you got to remember the doubles.

  • Okay.

  • If something is accessible, it means it's easy to get to or easy to achieve committee is a group of people who like to give their opinion about things.

  • Uh huh This one Look at the double letters in this one embarrassing.

  • And again, oh there's a bar, Hey, I get to go to the bar with another are so you can think of is like in bar bar dolar A double S.

  • Okay, the doubles are liking this.

  • This is um two more examples.

  • These are two more examples of, remember the double L.

  • Don't remember the double L.

  • It's your choice.

  • I always put them in um when we spell things like cancel or jewelry with a double L.

  • It's british spelling apparently in America, They only put one L.

  • in Canada.

  • We definitely put to.

  • But if you're writing your test and you only put one are sorry, one else fight it because that is normal in american english, which I kind of think it's cool because why do you need to because the rule here, but ju la la la la la la la la la la it's canceled.

  • No, just one go.

  • Um This is a fun rule, that doesn't make sense.

  • But I always say it because it's been nailed into my head since I was a little runny.

  • Uh huh, achieve achieve means you win your goal basically.

  • If you achieve something, we always say, okay, I before e so this is the you always put the eye before the okay before he okay.

  • Believe I before e.

  • Good.

  • So that's how we figure out that.

  • But then they have exceptions.

  • They say except after a C letter.

  • So if you see it, see Ei but but there's a C here, but it has to be directly after the C.

  • And then we have so many exceptions to this rule that when I was a kid, it was a good rule.

  • But now I'm like, that was terrible.

  • But I still say it and it might help you just be careful of those.

  • I would make um a little chart and I would put all the guys that fit into this and expect, see, I can't even spell this except see huh Ronnie.

  • You're terrible spelling.

  • Okay.

  • Except after C.

  • So I would make a chart.

  • All the ones that are nice and follow the rules and the rubbles.

  • The guys are like following this I before E rule.

  • So put them in a different category.

  • Get them out of there, leave it, achieve, believe these guys follow the rule.

  • Yeah, yeah.

  • This one disease.

  • I always trying to try and type it.

  • This disease.

  • The this I know there's a nest somewhere deceased.

  • This is this is.

  • But then when you look at it, you see the word, he's oh, oh wait, hey, that's easy.

  • Like ease.

  • Don't diss my easiness.

  • So disease.

  • You can think of it like this.

  • And then he's like easy.

  • This is not easy.

  • Okay.

  • This, this took a lot of effort and you really, really have to focus on your spelling when you're doing these tests.